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Author Topic: re: Interesting skoolie concept  (Read 1799 times)
Mex-Busnut
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« on: July 18, 2014, 08:36:18 AM »

I think what really caught my eye is how this architecture student made each section in such a way that it is endlessly adaptable for whatever purpose he has at the moment. Check it out.

http://www.hankboughtabus.com/
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Iceni John
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« Reply #1 on: July 18, 2014, 12:19:10 PM »

I bookmarked his website when I first read it  -  I'm definitely going to get some ideas from him.   I especially like his bus's open airy look by not having anything higher than the bottom of the windows, but unfortunately that isn't achievable for me.   His window shades are a good idea, and I'll also convert one of my roof hatches into a skylight above the bed.   I get ideas from lots of different places, some unconnected with bus conversions per se.   Le Corbusier said that a house is a machine for living in  -  my bus may be a mobile version of that concept.

John
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dukegrad98
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« Reply #2 on: July 18, 2014, 02:42:55 PM »

I wish he had started with a real coach platform instead of a school bus.  The reality is that there are plenty of coach shells out there for ridiculously cheap prices.  Heck, I know of one in particular, just put up on BNO!  I know of all the downsides beyond just cost, but still -- his implementation in a 40' or 45' would have been something more interesting to me.

That said, I have given thought to picking up a schoolie and cutting the back body off.  Then build some retractable ramps, put in some e-track, and all of a sudden I've got a unique and super-cheap hauler for my other cars, tractors, and toys.

Cheers, John
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BRUISER
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« Reply #3 on: July 18, 2014, 05:58:59 PM »

Do you mean like this Smiley

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TomC
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« Reply #4 on: July 18, 2014, 07:20:08 PM »

That for sure is a way to get the bus done quickly, cheaply, and usable. He'll find out what a pain the porta potti is, and get tired of constantly buying ice for the ice chest. Then no shower? Well, to each his own. Good Luck, TomC
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Lin
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« Reply #5 on: July 19, 2014, 09:48:08 AM »

It's not a bad school project, but I don't see anything particularly original.
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shelled
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« Reply #6 on: July 19, 2014, 01:28:31 PM »

It's not a bad school project, but I don't see anything particularly original.
Lin,

In all design fields, be it architecture or landscape or industrial design or whatever, there are rarely ever original design elements.  Partly that's a matter of matter (materials) and of constraints like the size of a bed.  Then there's the issue of cost.

In the real world, original design has to do with how the designer handles the elements to meet specific design goals and Hank's bus is certainly unique and met his design goals.

I say this as a person who has experience in architecture, landscape, engineering, industrial design, furniture design and automotive styling.

edward
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Lin
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« Reply #7 on: July 19, 2014, 01:55:51 PM »

Edward, I certainly do not disagree that one must deal with real world constraints.  However, the originality I am referring to is at least to have some innovative variations on what has been already been done.  I did not notice anything that has not been done in the many, many years of trailer construction or by Ikea.

Part of going to school is learning the process required for that particular field.  Students write ridiculous poems and paint crappy pictures, but they have to start somewhere.  That's an essential part of the learning process, and I respect it. 
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shelled
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« Reply #8 on: July 20, 2014, 02:50:53 PM »

Lin, indeed Hank's bus design is certainly that of a beginner.  It is very "archetectonic" and very much a school project.  Comfort, for instance, was sacrificed in favor of his ideal vision.

Even so, it is a far cry from any usual practice in either motorhomes or trailers.  His slide-up window shades that double as thermal insulation are something I've never seen elsewhere.  (Easily overlooked where they are described in the text.)

I also see special value in getting folks here to think about things like natural lighting.

edward
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Lin
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« Reply #9 on: July 20, 2014, 06:12:24 PM »

Edward, point taken. Sometimes someone that is new to a particular field may do things in a novel way that can be of value to others that have narrowed their vision through familiarity. 

How about this one:
Hong Kong architect turns shoebox apartment into 24 rooms
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Tony LEE
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« Reply #10 on: July 20, 2014, 09:00:25 PM »

That for sure is a way to get the bus done quickly, cheaply, and usable. He'll find out what a pain the porta potti is, and get tired of constantly buying ice for the ice chest. Then no shower? Well, to each his own. Good Luck, TomC

He does write that it is a work in progress and a plumbed toilet, stove top and fridge are next on the list.

I have a cassette toilet in two of our vehicles and where we use them, that concept is by far the better solution compared to having a large fixed black tank. Only wish the BigFoot camper had a cassette unit too.
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twostick
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« Reply #11 on: July 21, 2014, 09:10:40 PM »

Off topic a touch but this is an interesting spin on a skoolie.

Kevin
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Lin
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« Reply #12 on: July 21, 2014, 11:09:30 PM »

When we used to live in a heavy agricultural area, I used to see schoolies pulling porta potties. I had thought that it was for field workers, but now I see that they were just alternate RVers.
« Last Edit: July 22, 2014, 08:34:26 AM by Lin » Logged

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« Reply #13 on: July 22, 2014, 08:24:13 AM »

I just got my 9 back on the road a few weeks ago, I went with an open concept as well, it's definitely achievable with more amenities than he's done here, makes for amazing sights and pictures on the road




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opus
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« Reply #14 on: July 22, 2014, 09:10:00 AM »

I just got my 9 back on the road a few weeks ago, I went with an open concept as well, it's definitely achievable with more amenities than he's done here, makes for amazing sights and pictures on the road


I like!
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