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Author Topic: Trimming interior roof curves?  (Read 1100 times)
Luke Wilson
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« on: August 05, 2014, 08:08:26 AM »

We are getting to the point in our bus where we need to do trim (woohoo!), which brings up the question: what do you use to trim between the curved roof and interior walls?

I bought a piece of vinyl quarter round to see if it would work. I think i might be able to get it to work, but it is tough to bend at such an angle, and I wonder if there are better options that I haven't thought of.

The people at our local Menards & Home Depot probably thought I was crazy checking how bendable different pieces of trim are, haha! ;-)

Luke
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Luke Wilson
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Cary and Don
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« Reply #1 on: August 05, 2014, 08:14:16 AM »

On the 4107 we did, we used crown molding.  Laid it flush to the wall.  That left a gap at the top but it looked just fine that way and it covered the seam from the roof to the ceiling.  In the future it turned out to be pretty handing for laying speaker wires in.

Don and Cary
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« Reply #2 on: August 05, 2014, 08:20:31 AM »

the tight radius' of my interior ceiling are all used for cabinet and indirect lighting, which also provide recessed direct lighting.
some portions of this also provide wire chase and integral AC ducting...
the ceiling panels are "retained" with red oak..painted white.

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Donald PH
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TomC
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« Reply #3 on: August 05, 2014, 06:51:06 PM »

If is where the walls meet the ceiling, I simply used white silicone smoothed with my finger. Amazing how much it will cover and make look smooth. On the ceiling, I used 1.5" Oak strips.What you use is dependant on what type of look you're trying for. I just want a nice look with a cabin feel. Good Luck, TomC
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Charles in SC
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« Reply #4 on: August 05, 2014, 07:37:15 PM »

I am pretty sure they make bendable moulding if that is what you want. I would ask a "good" interior finish carpenter.
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« Reply #5 on: August 06, 2014, 07:12:17 AM »

I used 3/4 Rope and screwed it where needed. If you need to hide a wire just remove a screw and pull it behind the rope. Grin

Dave
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Luke Wilson
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« Reply #6 on: August 06, 2014, 07:46:38 AM »

Thanks for the responses everyone, really appreciate it.

Sorry if I was a bit unclear before: I was talking about a wall that goes across the width of the bus, so one side of the paneling is curved to match the curvature of bus side wall. That's where I need the flexible trim. Here's a pic of the place I mean: https://db.tt/PBFTfY26

Cary and Don: I can't get in my mind exactly what you mean about laying the crown molding flush to the wall and having a gap... sorry about the dense-ness, haha. I didn't think crown molding would work where I'm talking about because of the curvature... Does the 4107 have curved sides like an MC9?

Charles in SC: I will have to look into that, thanks for the tip!
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Luke Wilson
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« Reply #7 on: August 06, 2014, 08:04:00 AM »

get some thin plywood one eighth or one quarter,a pair of scribers,cut the plywood to get it close the radius then hold it plumb and level to the wall and scribe the curve on to the plywood, now you have a template to make the finish trim or wall material fit the radius.
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Timothy
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« Reply #8 on: August 06, 2014, 01:16:28 PM »

Go to the web and type in flexible molding trim, several choices of providers that will work perfectly for your application. A little pricey but results will look professional. Good luck and please post a pic of the finished product.
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robertglines1
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« Reply #9 on: August 06, 2014, 02:33:53 PM »

If you still have the female side of the wall panel cut you have a pattern.  One idea is make you a male piece just like the top of the wall about 2inches wide out of a piece of laun.  Cover piece with white vinyl or what ever covering you are going to put on wall.  couple of well placed screws or panel adhesive will hold it in place.  What ever you use on ceiling would be a good match.  FWIW   Bob
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« Reply #10 on: August 07, 2014, 06:04:38 PM »

http://www.outwatercatalogs.com/home/index.cfm has the flexible mouldings. Mostly in the Orac Decor catalog (look in the "Supplemental Catalogs" section towards the bottom of the webpage). They aren't cheap.

The alternative is to use a router bit and make your own moulding. We prefer to use the old fashioned multi-piece built-up profile for mouldings. Comes from having to make period correct mouldings to fit into older houses with imperfect walls. A thin piece of trim is easier to bend than the single piece 10" tall crown trim.

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mike802
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« Reply #11 on: August 07, 2014, 09:12:55 PM »

You could use whats called a Windlace.  It was used on antique cars, it is a soft rubber tube approximately 1/2 inch thick upholstered with your choice of fabric, or vinyl.  It you have a sewing machine you can buy un-upholstered windlace and just wrap your fabric around it and sew it close to the rubber leaving enough of a tail to staple to the top of your wall.  When in place it will cover any imperfections.  I have a TV cabinet mounted to the ceiling in my bedroom that was very difficult to cut to a perfect match so I upholstered some windlace tubing in fabric that matched my ceiling and I think it looks real nice.  I am building some upper cabinets for the bathroom right now and I may have to use it again, this time in a white vinyl to match the white ceiling.  if I do end up using it, and if I can remember, I will make a video showing how its done.  If you are interested I could post a picture of the TV cabinet for you, let me know.
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Mike
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Luke Wilson
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« Reply #12 on: August 08, 2014, 09:06:29 AM »

Thanks for all the insights everyone, really appreciate it.

As it stands right now, after doing some more research based on your suggestions, I think I'm going to give this a whirl and see how it turns out: http://youtu.be/VlfVUILsVVE

I'll be sure to post some pictures when it's done, whether good or bad, :-)
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Luke Wilson
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« Reply #13 on: August 08, 2014, 02:07:06 PM »

http://www.retailmenot.com/view/wishihadthat.com

discount codes...might help...

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Donald PH
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« Reply #14 on: August 08, 2014, 04:22:22 PM »

Luke - You were asking about vinyl molding earlier...I used this in my bathroom for trim.  Very flexible.  A little heat (very little) helps.  It took me a few tries to get it right but I got it to cover 90 degree turns.

-Sean

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« Reply #15 on: August 08, 2014, 05:08:19 PM »

Thanks for the responses everyone, really appreciate it.

Sorry if I was a bit unclear before: I was talking about a wall that goes across the width of the bus, so one side of the paneling is curved to match the curvature of bus side wall. That's where I need the flexible trim. Here's a pic of the place I mean: https://db.tt/PBFTfY26

Cary and Don: I can't get in my mind exactly what you mean about laying the crown molding flush to the wall and having a gap... sorry about the dense-ness, haha. I didn't think crown molding would work where I'm talking about because of the curvature... Does the 4107 have curved sides like an MC9?

Charles in SC: I will have to look into that, thanks for the tip!

I made up a crude steamer and steam bent normal timber mouldings
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mike802
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« Reply #16 on: August 08, 2014, 05:09:38 PM »

Luke:  That looks like a really cool idea!  it's amazing what you can find on youtube. Good luck with the project and don't forget to let's us know how it turns out.
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Mike
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