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Author Topic: Cummins n14  (Read 695 times)
BRUISER
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« on: August 27, 2014, 07:15:52 AM »

Has anyone out a Cummins n14 in a Eagle bus?

a buddy just bought an Eagle and he has a line on a Cummins n14 and was wondering if anyone has made it fit?

he currently has a 6v92 in his and would like more power when pulling hills.. he plans to drive from Jersey to Cali a few times a year pulling a 2 car trailer

thanks in advance
Ken C
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iMPAKS.com
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1983 MCI MC-9
luvrbus
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« Reply #1 on: August 27, 2014, 07:20:51 AM »

The N14 is the same size as the 855 they fit a Eagle lots of Eagles running around with Cat,Cummins and series 60 engines
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TomC
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« Reply #2 on: August 27, 2014, 07:22:25 AM »

Like the Series 60 or Caterpillar 3406/C15, the Cummins N14 is a big block engine. And it actually weighs more then the other two engines (over 3,000lbs). A very high engine (especially with Jake Brakes). While it is still made, it is an expensive (more then Cat) engine to work on. For ease of swapping and being close to 1,000lbs lighter, I would go with the Cummins ISM rebuilt to RV specs at 500hp and 1550lb/ft torque. Another good engine about the same size is the Caterpillar C12 (not the 3176 or C13). The N14 will just be a big dinosaur to work with. Any engine can be put in a bus-how much engineering and money do you have? Good Luck, TomC
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Tom & Donna Christman. '77 AMGeneral 10240B; 8V-71TATAIC V730.
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« Reply #3 on: August 27, 2014, 07:37:36 AM »

Gearing is the problem with a Eagle most go to 10 speed auto shift a lot cheaper than a 6 speed Allison
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Boomer
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« Reply #4 on: August 27, 2014, 07:42:41 AM »

I had an N14 525 and HT740 in my Eagle before I replaced it with my ISM/World Trans.
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'81 Eagle 15/45
'47 GM PD3751-438
'65 Crown Atomic
Vancouver, WA USA
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« Reply #5 on: August 27, 2014, 12:13:50 PM »

thank you for info so far
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iMPAKS.com
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Brian Diehl
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« Reply #6 on: August 29, 2014, 07:20:34 AM »

I don't have an eagle, but can share about my experience in an MCI.  I put a Cummins ISM in my 96A3 in 2007.  I now have almost almost 45k miles on the clock since the conversion.  The ISM I have is rated at 400hp and 1450lb/ft.  It is a FANTASTIC upgrade!  I went from getting just over 6 mpg to getting right around 9.  The last two tanks of in state driving without head winds clocked in at almost 10MPG.  I have 3.33.1 gears with the Gen 1 Eaton AutoShift.  It makes for about 1150 rpms at 60 mph.  This is an excellent setup if you don't mind the clutch for getting the vehicle rolling or coming to a stop.   If your friends overall weight is going to be under about 38000 lbs 400 hp will be plenty.  If he is heavier then he will end up wanting more power.  My bus weighs right around 31500 and is very responsive.  When I hook up my 5000lb jeep I can definitely notice the difference.
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Boomer
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« Reply #7 on: August 29, 2014, 09:12:46 AM »

I get very similar performance as Brian with my ISM. Mine is a pre-EGR engine that I bought with 26 total hours on it.  HD4560P World transmission with 3.36 rear, 315/80R22.5, and 45,000# gross weight with tow car.  The best I have done on a 800 mile trip is 9.8 mpg.  Overall averages are 8.8-9.3 mpg depending on routes and conditions.  This is fuel through the engine, monitored by Silverleaf, not fuzzy math.  I drive no faster than 62 mph and it turns 1280 rpm at that speed in 5th gear.  I use cruise as much as possible.   The engine is set at 450/1450.  The engine is light, smooth and very responsive.   40,000 miles on it so far.  Not one single leak or mechanical issue. Highly recommend them, as Brian.
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'81 Eagle 15/45
'47 GM PD3751-438
'65 Crown Atomic
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« Reply #8 on: August 29, 2014, 09:20:41 AM »

To me the N-14 was without a doubt was the worst engine I ever owned besides the ISM 440 E I had 2 of each in trucks they were bad
« Last Edit: August 29, 2014, 09:38:42 AM by luvrbus » Logged

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« Reply #9 on: August 29, 2014, 01:34:01 PM »

Been there, done that. In a 102A3
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102A3 N14 Auto Shift
HB of CJ
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« Reply #10 on: August 29, 2014, 03:16:02 PM »

The Big Cam Cummins series predates the N14.  Both were/are available without electronic controls of any kind.  I think, (some help here) the N14 came with the Cummins version of the Jake Brake built right into the engine.  The N14 might be a little bit taller than the older Big Cam equipped with a Jake Brake.  Not sure.  Been too long.

Anyhow, both the mechanical versions can be hopped up using either used or new inexpensive, (relative speaking) factory parts.  Older 2 stroke Detroit expertise may be dying off....however, out here in SW Oregon, the older Cummins are king.  Easy to find a mechanic.  I was going to update to a Big Cam Cummins in my old Crown Supercoach.

It is all about costs, availability and maintenance ease.  Nothing wrong with the older Big Cam Cummins.  Power ratings all the way to 475/1450 are easily made going $cheap$.  Another advantage is that the mills have zero $electronical$ stuff to fail.  Try www.pittsburgfuelinjection.net   They may still have a site.  HB of CJ (old coot)  hope this helps.
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luvrbus
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« Reply #11 on: August 29, 2014, 03:58:10 PM »

The early N14 were mechanical engines they were based on the old reliable 855,the N14 Celect and Celect+ where not that good mine made a steady diet of the 3000 bucks a set injectors and the cooling plate in the ECM was a joke back then a ECM would cost you 5000 grand and the ECM did not last.

Cummins had the nerve to tell me a electronic ECM would just take so much heat then they fail they were right but you paid 

I don't know how long the N14 was around with all 3 models but the Celect+ N14 just lived for 2 years
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