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Author Topic: Safety issues and recap tires  (Read 2660 times)
NJT 5573
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« on: January 05, 2007, 12:29:09 AM »

Im posting this since someone here posted about buying some recently. I think they are to dangerous. The cap is about 8 feet long, we all know they fail. On a truck a failure is not a big issue, the cap ends up laying on the highway. On a coach, the cap cannot get out from under the bus. They have been known to come thru the floor boards at greyhound and kill passengers. If you gotta run them you gotta check them regularily. If the tread is loose anywhere around the tire they have to come off immediately.
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"Ammo Warrior" Keepers Of The Peace, Creators Of Destruction.
Gold is the money of Kings, Silver is the money of Gentlemen, Barter is the money of Peasants, Debt is the money of Slaves.

$1M in $1000 bills = 8 inches high.
$1B in $1000 bills = 800 feet high.
$1T in $1000 bills = 142 miles high
Dallas
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« Reply #1 on: January 05, 2007, 04:58:33 AM »

Sorry, NJT.

I have to disagree with you.
Retreaded tires have been proven to be less likely to separate from the carcass than new tires.
If you look at the pieces of tread laying along side the road, pay attention to whether they have wire in them or not. You will notice that the majority has wire in it, indicating it was a new tire not a retread.

I ran caps on all my trucks for years, and seldom had problems with them, and when I did, it was usually an outside dual on the passenger side... caused by the driver curbing the tire or otherwise causing damage by running over something. I personally have driven over 3 million miles as a professional OTR driver, most of those miles rding on recaps.

You may also be interested in knowing that many airlines use recaps on their planes. The percentage I was quoted was 80%, but I couldn't swear to that.

Here is some information you may want to explore:

http://pubsindex.trb.org/document/view/default.asp?lbid=577457

http://www.retread.org/Rubber/

www.ncleg.net/news/TireRetreadStudyandAnalysis.pdf

http://greenguardian.com/EPPG/7_4.asp

http://www.twna.org/retreads.htm

If you would, and can, please show me, where retreaded tires are historically more prone to failure than new rubber?

Please don't use inuendo, hype or any preconcieved ideas. I would like to see facts, backed up by literature from a reliable source.

Thanks.
Dallas
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Len Silva
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« Reply #2 on: January 05, 2007, 06:22:13 AM »

Speaking of tires,

Have you considered any of the automatic tire inflation systems on the market?

Here's one:  http://www.saferco.com/vigia.asp

I've seen them on some tour busses and heavy trucks.  From this website, it looks like around $1200.

Len
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Jeremy
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« Reply #3 on: January 05, 2007, 07:02:13 AM »

I've just had a quick look at the website of that company. To quote their promo video - "80% of flat tyres are caused by loss of pressure". I'd like to see the remaining 20% of flat tyres that hadn't lost pressure!

Jeremy
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« Reply #4 on: January 05, 2007, 08:14:14 AM »

It has been proven that over 50% of alligators in the road (the big rubber pieces from blown up tires) are from new tires.  Personally ran them during the 55mph days, but when the highway speeds went back up, went back to new tires only on my truck.  I still had to run them on the company trailer, and in general had to replace all the tires every year (one way or another).  Went with another company that put only new tires on the trailer (255/70R-22.5 low profile) and the tires would last 3 years.

As a personal observation, came across the Bandag company bus that goes with the display at fairs, etc.  They were running retreads (cold rolled) all the way around-including the steering axle.  The tires looked a bit flat, so I asked the driver what was up and he said he likes to run on the low side for a better ride.  He also said in the X amount of years he'd been driving for Bandag-no problems.

There are two types of retreads.  One is the hot molded where they roll about 2" continuous strip of hot rubber onto the tires until the proper thickness has been obtained then put the tire into a mold with the tread pattern on it.  They then bake the tire.  The other method is the cold mold where the tire is ground down to make it round again, any blemishes are fixed, then a pre molded tread is glued on, cut and stapled together.  This is then baked.  The cold molded method is mostly used today.

If I were watching my costs closely, I would run Bandag retreads on the drivers and tags.  It is illegal to run retreads on the steering axle of a commercial vehicle that goes over state lines.  Look at a UPS step van-they run them on the steering too!  Good Luck, TomC
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« Reply #5 on: January 05, 2007, 02:19:50 PM »

I'm with these guys.

Remanufactured tires are fine, and a good way to save some money.

Tire inflation is your number one concern for all tires. Under inflation is where the 'gators out on the road come from, not specifically re-capped tires.

Been studied by universities on behalf of the government, kids picked up all the pieces and if you know what you are looking at, the tire tells you what wrecked it by the way it came apart.

But, if you feel better running virgin tires, then feel good about it and get the best ones you can afford!

happy coaching!
buswarrior
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« Reply #6 on: January 05, 2007, 03:24:35 PM »

When I worked out on I-95 as a Deputy here in Florida in the days of the CB radios the truckers used to call them "alligators" laying in the road. I would get em out of the road before someone hit it. I have seen them mess up a front end and undercarrigeof some unsuspecting passerby.
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NJT 5573
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« Reply #7 on: January 05, 2007, 10:16:46 PM »

congrats, Dallas. I've got a deal for you. Just went out to my tire room and found 4 virgin bridgestone casings. The first one has 3 patches in it, 1 small 2 medium the dot stamp is 8 week of 95. 12 years old, the next 3 have all had larger than nail hole damage, but with section repairs are all very recapable. one is dot 42 week of 99, one is 13 of 00 and the last one is 28 week of 01. 5 years old. my recappers have been trying to grab them and cap them up for me for about $150 each. I was afraid I could not get value for my money and have stopped them from leaving the shop. I'm going to get them capped up for you send them to you, pay to have them put on your coach for you free of charge to you. all I ask is that you run them until they are worn out on your coach and let us know the results. let me know where to send them.
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"Ammo Warrior" Keepers Of The Peace, Creators Of Destruction.
Gold is the money of Kings, Silver is the money of Gentlemen, Barter is the money of Peasants, Debt is the money of Slaves.

$1M in $1000 bills = 8 inches high.
$1B in $1000 bills = 800 feet high.
$1T in $1000 bills = 142 miles high
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