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Author Topic: 6v92 Antifreeze coming out of passenger side slobber tube?!  (Read 4277 times)
Brian Diehl
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« Reply #15 on: January 08, 2007, 09:12:02 AM »

Brian E. yeah I've been contemplating a repower for a while... I'm still trying to figure out how much fixing my existing engine is going to cost ... Could only cost me a couple hundred dollars to do it myself ... though still need to find someone to come out and set the injectors, valves, rack etc (tuneup) after I put it back together before I can start it. 

I'm contemplating a Cummins ISL350 or ISL400.  So far my research leads me to believe it will fit and the ECU would have no problem with a mechanical automatic transmission.  I'm still trying to find one though... haven't found a single used ISL to even begin to get a price on it.
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belfert
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« Reply #16 on: January 08, 2007, 09:15:35 AM »

Why not a Cummins M11 or M11+?  Van Hool has used these for a number of years and I believe still uses them.  The M11 isn't supposed to be as tall as some of the others like a Series 50/60.

Brian Elfert
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luvrbus
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« Reply #17 on: January 08, 2007, 09:27:40 AM »

brian i missed spelled the name it monaco tool sorry
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Brian Diehl
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« Reply #18 on: January 08, 2007, 09:47:09 AM »

Why not a Cummins M11 or M11+? Brian Elfert

The M11 is too long... Won't fit ... The ISL is 43" long and should fit with the initial research I've done.
« Last Edit: January 08, 2007, 10:23:30 AM by Brian Diehl » Logged
Busnut83
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« Reply #19 on: January 08, 2007, 11:15:45 AM »

What is a slobber tube???

      thanks
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buswarrior
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« Reply #20 on: January 08, 2007, 04:05:34 PM »

Hello Brian

How much coolant is in the oil?

You might get lucky, all depends on how much coolant has been pretending to be lubrication.

If you are thinking re-power, now might be the time.

If you open up that motor, you risk keeping it and going to spend a ton - oh - cash on it.

If you leave it alone, it has some value in it's present condition, still able to run, known internal leak, not messed with. No one wants a bunch of parts some guy took apart.

Do some asking around and see what horse trading you might be able to do.

Find a DD mechanic that wants to come out on the weekend and make some cash direct from you.
Find a motor and someone who can make a buck off yours.

Remember, the guy who fixes the motor makes the buck, you are trying to cut your losses.

happy coaching!
buswarrior

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lloyd
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« Reply #21 on: January 08, 2007, 04:53:52 PM »

Brian, you need a tool to remove the cylinder liners. The proper tool locks into the ports of the liner and removes the piston and liner in one unit after you have removed the rod cap. It locks into the liner above the piston and then you bar the engine over and the liner comes out and then pull the piston with it. If all you are doing is o-rings then do not distribe the piston and liner and then reinstall after cleaning everytthing up. If the coolant was coming out of the air box drain and not into the pan the crank should be ok, the bearing will depend on mileage/age.
Nothing alittle dirty hands won't fix, good luck
Lloyd
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NJT5047
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« Reply #22 on: January 08, 2007, 05:02:00 PM »

What is a slobber tube???
 thanks

Slobber tubes: may also be known as "airbox drains"...small hose, one on each side of a "V" engine block. They drain condensed oil (and any other fluid that finds its way into the airbox) from the airbox. Sorta messy concept generally found on 2 cycles.
"Slobber tubes" should not be confused with a slobbering exhaust...or road draft tubes. Wink
JR



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JR Lynch , Charlotte, NC
87 MC9, 6V92TA DDEC, HT748R ATEC

"Every government interference in the economy consists of giving an unearned benefit, extorted by force, to some men at the expense of others.

Ayn Rand
Brian Diehl
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« Reply #23 on: January 08, 2007, 06:30:41 PM »

Hello Brian

How much coolant is in the oil?


happy coaching!
buswarrior



I haven't checked for coolant in the oil yet.  You make it sound like I'm pretty much for sure going to have coolant in the oil.  Why is that?  Maybe I'll try and crack open the drain plug tomorrow night and see if oil comes out or water (since water is heavier than oil)...  Sound like the correct plan?
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Brian Diehl
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« Reply #24 on: January 08, 2007, 06:33:42 PM »

Why not a Cummins M11 or M11+?  Brian Elfert

The M11 is too long... Won't fit ... The ISL is 43" long and should fit with the initial research I've done.

Although, If I'm willing to ditch my ht754 (just rebuilt 20,000 miles ago) and put a shorter tranny in I could probably look at the M11.  I've seen a lot of them sell on ebay in older tractors for less than $10k.  The biggest issue is they have all had manual transmissions.  I'd love to stick with an automatic tranny.  I wonder how much I could get from an older tractor parting it out after pulling the engine and computer/dash componentry?
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belfert
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« Reply #25 on: January 08, 2007, 08:05:14 PM »

Although, If I'm willing to ditch my ht754 (just rebuilt 20,000 miles ago) and put a shorter tranny in I could probably look at the M11. I've seen a lot of them sell on ebay in older tractors for less than $10k. The biggest issue is they have all had manual transmissions. I'd love to stick with an automatic tranny. I wonder how much I could get from an older tractor parting it out after pulling the engine and computer/dash componentry?

I think selling the remains of an older tractor after the most expensive parts are gone would be difficult at best.  The tranny might be worth something if you don't use it.

I don't know that I have ever heard of anything besides an RV that used an ISL engine which is probably why they are hard to find.  The ISL is pretty small by current semi tractor standards.  A salvage RV might be a source for an ISL.

Is a B500 tranny any shorter than the HT754?  The B500 would mate up a lot better in any case, especially with the dual overdrives.  You might find a MD4000 or MH4000 series tranny cheaper which is basically the same as a B500 I believe.

Brian Elfert

Brian Elfert
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buswarrior
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« Reply #26 on: January 09, 2007, 01:10:35 PM »

Hello Brian.

Coolant in oil gives you an idea of how bad the rest will be, and lets you decide early whether to bother opening it up or just go get your re-power.

Coolant in the oil is bad for the bearings and the lifters/injector mechanically touching parts.

And that leads quickly to a rebuild, top and bottom.

happy coaching!
buswarrior

PS, easy to pull a valve cover and check the touching surfaces of the rockers against the valves and the injectors. Smooth and shiny is what you want, scoring or dug in divits, not good.
« Last Edit: January 09, 2007, 01:12:48 PM by buswarrior » Logged

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Sammy
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« Reply #27 on: January 09, 2007, 02:06:28 PM »

Brian, I would drain the engine oil, check it for contamination and remove the oil pan.
Check the coolant level, top it off if you need to.
Next thing I would do is remove the air box covers and pressurize the cooling system with 8psi of compressed air.
You will now be able to make a better diagnosis of what your defect might be.
Good luck with your coach.
Sammy  Cool
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Brian Diehl
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« Reply #28 on: January 09, 2007, 06:01:23 PM »

Well, drained about a quart of coolant out of the oil pan drain (didn't drain the oil).  I also pulled a valve cover.  The interior was "normal" looking to me.  There was only oil ... I.E. no foaming at all.  I would expect that if I'd been running with coolant in the oil for any length of time then I would have some evidence of foam at the top of the engine.  I couldn't see any wear surfaces as they are all covered up with the rockers/injector actuators.  Is it time to pull a head now?
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Timkar
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« Reply #29 on: January 09, 2007, 07:42:30 PM »

Not trying to hijack thread but I have a similar question. I've been looking at a 1973 Eagle 8V71 with slight coolant in oil pan. Owner claims it is an injector tube leaking and he has had this happen before on other engines...Is this a possibility or is it more likely to be liner seals?
TIA..
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Cawston, British Columbia
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