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Author Topic: home made 12 volt generator  (Read 11777 times)
NewbeeMC9
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1981 MC9 8V71, HT 740




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« Reply #45 on: January 30, 2007, 04:24:29 PM »

I think its a conspiracy started by  Generac Grin
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It's all fun and games til someone gets hurt. Wink
gr8njt
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« Reply #46 on: January 30, 2007, 05:19:49 PM »

Hey Gr8njt,
 Thanks for the note Shocked, it was rather entertaining to read (and all this after the thread almost got away from Captain Ron).
The accidentally deleted post I wrote previously may have given you the extra edge to get that PhD  Wink.
Cheers!-Tim
Tim,
You deserve the accolade for a great basic instructional post void of discouraging statement.
I bet Capt Ron and a lot of Busnuts (me included) really appreciate posts like yours that has real substance to help us in these taboo projects so we don't have to do projects like this behind closed doors. Check your PM.
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****1982 MCI-9 Crusader-II Bus Conversion****
R&M 102 C-3 style Front & Rear cap with louver kit
smooth side kit, dash-board kit, one piece siding
Tim Strommen
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« Reply #47 on: January 30, 2007, 05:58:31 PM »

Thanks again.

Already replied to your PM via email.  I believe the only reason I'll discourage anyone is to promote safety only.

Otherwise, I try to obviously call out my opinions and just stick with facts the rest of the time (of course - even I make mistakes when I'm tired, but I'm quick to admit them when it's called out Smiley).

Git-er Done!

Cheers!

-Tim
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Fremont, CA
1984 Gillig Phantom 40/102
DD 6V92TA (MUI, 275HP) - Allison HT740
Conversion Progress: 10% (9-years invested, 30 to go Smiley)
DrivingMissLazy
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« Reply #48 on: January 30, 2007, 07:40:00 PM »

Tim, I also would like to thank you for a very well written post, or as  gr8njt  put it, INFORMATIVE, INTELLIGENT AND  WELL ARTICULATED SCHOLARLY POSTING. I Just reviewed all your prior posts and they all fit into the same category so I am happy to have such an articulate member here on the board.

It would be very interesting to me, and I believe to many others, to find out what your background is that gives you this capability of posting such responsive replies. It would also be interesting to find out if you also have practical experience in developing such systems.

Thanks again,
Richard
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Life should NOT be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in an attractive and well preserved body. But rather to skid in sideways, chocolate in one hand, a good Reisling in the other, body thoroughly used up, totally worn out and screaming:  WOO HOO, what a ride
captain ron
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« Reply #49 on: January 30, 2007, 08:56:51 PM »

Ok you two enough a$$ kissing  Grin   Thanks Tim  Wink Of course I didn't under stand any of it but when it comes time to build mine you will be the first person I'll have my helper Bill call when we get stuck.
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gr8njt
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« Reply #50 on: January 31, 2007, 05:48:41 AM »

I used all the formula provided by Tim and played with calculations going forward, backwards and every which way with every possible combination of parts for the past 48 hours that I feel I could now do it in my sleep. Factoring any projected energy consumption, they always arrive at a logical and safe combination to putting the needed parts together. It eliminates the incompatible part/s and redirects to the correct specs of any needed part. Now I know what other parts I will need to "hunt" for, purchase  and/or fabricate.

With the aid of these tools (formula), they reinforce confidence that you're on the right track  and keeps the project well grounded (no pun intended) without the irrelevant bull crap.
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****1982 MCI-9 Crusader-II Bus Conversion****
R&M 102 C-3 style Front & Rear cap with louver kit
smooth side kit, dash-board kit, one piece siding
Tim Strommen
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« Reply #51 on: January 31, 2007, 02:20:08 PM »

...It would be very interesting to me, and I believe to many others, to find out what your background is that gives you this capability of posting such responsive replies. It would also be interesting to find out if you also have practical experience in developing such systems...

I'm a Senior Test Engineer at a video processing technology company in the Silicon Valley (Anchor Bay - we make the DVDO brand video scalers).  Previously, I installed commercial telecommunications infrastructure in the same area, and previously desktop support for a law firm out in Palo Alto (Wilson Sonsini Goodrich & Rosati - WSGR).  Before that I installed Home Theaters, and before that car stereos (competition and show pieces).  My night job(s) were running sound at a few clubs, and a small recording studio in Emeryville - and eventually front-house sound for a local S.F. Bay Area band "The Ones and Zeros" for about 3 years in the beginning of their carreer (they are still around - and they gave me the nickname "10-inch-Tim", don't ask... Grin).

I also had a breif stint as a Loss Prevention Officer for Fry's Electronics (big "Best Buy" competitor) during the "dot-com burst".  I've been around the block a time or two.

I've done over 300 car stereo installations over the last 10 years (a few recently), and have have some experience restoring cars ('73 vintage and older).  For home theaters, I've done low and high-voltage electrical for audio and video distribution, climate control, and lighting control in over another 100 installs (including a few jobs that were over $500K).

I've designed a few stand alone power systems for a few cabins (renewable/non-renewable off grid power), and desinged several PCBs for requested tasks (for friends-colleges).

I just generally enjoy electronics and engineering.  All this, and I'm only turning 27 in a few days Wink.

My bus is just another outlet for my restless mind (and while it's too cold/wet to work on that I lurk around here and BNO's bbs).

That's me...

Cheers!

-Tim

P.S. From my install days (both Home Theater and Car Audio) I can make one more recommendation:  design three electrical systems.  The first is to be designed based on what you'll only need as the bare minimum to sustain your intended use pattern.  The second should include the maximum "luxury" you would dare dream to cram into a bus (or car or home).  The final should be a happy medium (leaning towards the maximum you can afford), between what you've designed in the first two.  Things will change later, so make things easy to chage (and add a little margin).  Don't make one system heavily reliant on any other system - this will require more work if you make a change later (my old boss for commercial telecom gave me a good nugget for this one: "If you have to do it twice, you didn't do it right the first time - and you won't be making any money on it") -Tim
« Last Edit: July 01, 2008, 02:57:21 PM by Tim Strommen » Logged

Fremont, CA
1984 Gillig Phantom 40/102
DD 6V92TA (MUI, 275HP) - Allison HT740
Conversion Progress: 10% (9-years invested, 30 to go Smiley)
DrivingMissLazy
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« Reply #52 on: January 31, 2007, 02:30:43 PM »

Thanks so much Tim. It is always so interesting to me to see where others have BTDT. Quite an interesting life so far and I suspect it will get even more interesting as time goes on.
Richard
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Life should NOT be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in an attractive and well preserved body. But rather to skid in sideways, chocolate in one hand, a good Reisling in the other, body thoroughly used up, totally worn out and screaming:  WOO HOO, what a ride
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