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Author Topic: where to hook oil cooler lines on 6v92t v730?  (Read 749 times)
jimandsuzy
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« on: January 29, 2007, 09:20:53 PM »

I want to add an air to engine-oil cooler on my 6v92t v730 but don't know the best place is to attach the lines to the engine. I'm planning on using a truck trans cooler that's about 20" by 24" that a friend will give me. I think I'll put it next to my luber finer, just behind the diff,  with auto elec fans and a thermostat to run the fans.
Does anyone have a 6v92 with an oil cooler? What size is it and where is it mounted?
I want to do this because in summer if I drive over 60 my water temp goes above 195 on the flats. Prev owner put a new radiator in but it didn't change heating.
Thanks for any info and/or opinions, Jim
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1978 40' Flyer (Canadian) 6V92T V730
TomC
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« Reply #1 on: January 29, 2007, 10:48:16 PM »

I have a 8V-71TI (turbo and air to air intercooled).  When Don Fairchild had it back together he took the engine cradle without the transmission to a engine dyno and ran it for quite a long time at full throttle with no heating problems.  Back in the bus with the V730, I heated the engine up to 200 in 70 degree weather.  I changed my 5 row straight fin to 6 row serpentine fin radiator core.  Seems to be fine now.  The engine oil cooler on a Detroit works very well and I suggest you leave it alone.  BUT- if you do anything with that cooler, put it on the transmission.  The trick thing would be to have the hot oil coming out of the transmission first go through the air to oil cooler you have, then that will take most of the heat strain away from the radiator.  Then have it feed into the regular shell cooler, then on a cold day the shell cooler will actually keep the transmission warm-it is just as bad to have it run too cool.  Suggest you mount the air to oil cooler in the right side door by the transmission to keep the lines short and run one or two electric radiator fans just hooked to a simple toggle switch on the dash.  On hot days can run it all the time, on cooler days, when the temp comes up.  Good Luck, TomC
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Tom & Donna Christman. '77 AMGeneral 10240B; 8V-71TATAIC V730.
jimandsuzy
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« Reply #2 on: January 30, 2007, 08:21:30 PM »

Thanks for your reply. I have a Western Flyer (Canadian) and it does not have an oil cool or an intercooler. What does your oil cooler look like and where is it mounted? I like your idea of cooling the trans oil before it dumps its heat to the engine water.  I need to get some temp gauges before I make any changes so I can tell what's happening. I have looked into a bigger radiator but I'm told they're over $1,000. Jim
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1978 40' Flyer (Canadian) 6V92T V730
TomC
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« Reply #3 on: January 30, 2007, 10:15:49 PM »

Jim- your correct that the radiator is expensive, but then again everything on this big of a level is.  My radiator was $1,900 to recore, but the shop I had it done at has the best reputation.  Besides, I'm planning on keeping my bus for another 10 years.  My bus is an 1977 AMGeneral 10240B which is basically a D800 Flyer.  Which model do you have?

With the V drive, it is hard to see the engine oil cooler since it is on the back side of the engine near the front of the engine down below the heads.  If you follow the lower hose of the radiator (the cool side) it goes up to the water pump then into the square housing of the oil cooler.

The transmission HAS to have some sort of cooler.  Some have an extra cooler on the engine so it looks like the engine has one cooler behind the next.  The more popular is like mine with a shell cooler (it looks like a pipe about 4 inches in diameter that is enclosed at either end with a total of 4 hoses-two for the coolant and two for the transmission fluid).  If you look, you'll see one of these two types of coolers.

You don't have an air to air intercooler since the 6V-92TA has its' own aftercooler built into the valley of the engine block that is run with the radiator coolant.  It is very small compared to an air to air intercooler.  The air to air intercooler has a much bigger temperature drop for the intake air-that's why virtually all Turboe'd Diesel engines now use air to air intercoolers (they look like another radiator that is mounted in front of the coolant radiator to cool the turbo air.  Anytime you compress air, it gets hot.  Turbo air at 20psi can be over 300 degrees.  The cooler you get that air the more dense it becomes hence more air in the cylinders)  Just a little info.  Good Luck, TomC
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Tom & Donna Christman. '77 AMGeneral 10240B; 8V-71TATAIC V730.
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