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Author Topic: Parting out 4106 - maybe  (Read 2005 times)
chessie4905
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« Reply #15 on: October 13, 2017, 07:15:43 AM »

Keep in mind how much time and cost chasing everything to convert your new one to an automatic alone. Plus you have everything but a couple slave or masters for your Jake brakes. Id' figure some way to move it. If you don't you'll be kicking yourself for years for letting it go.
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GMC h8h 649#028 (4905)
Pennsylvania-central
chessie4905
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« Reply #16 on: October 13, 2017, 07:16:04 AM »

Keep in mind how much time and cost chasing everything to convert your new one to an automatic alone. Plus you have everything but a couple slave or masters for your Jake brakes. Id' figure some way to move it. If you don't you'll be kicking yourself for years for letting it go.
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GMC h8h 649#028 (4905)
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richard5933
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« Reply #17 on: October 13, 2017, 08:00:03 AM »

Anyone have any leads on a company within a few hour of Des Moines that could transport and temporarily store the 4106?

Richard
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Richard
1974 GMC P8M4108a-125 (Current Bus)
1964 GM PD4106-2412
Located in beautiful Wisconsin
KD9GRB
j.m.jackson
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« Reply #18 on: October 13, 2017, 08:06:02 AM »

Bring it home. The engine / transmission, the windows, the genny, doors, the unobtanium parts (wheel arch mouldings), wheels, webasto, the parts that you know. Consider it your mechanical insurance. The way things go for me, having a complete parts bus would guarantee that I'd never need them, because I have them on hand.

Think about this. You have the engine die in your new unit. It may run great today and catastrophically fail tomorrow. It would be really nice to have your known engine right there.

Same thing on the auto tranny, you've got everything right there.

Too bad coachnet won't tow it home. "Nearest qualified repair facility' is home.
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1969 GMC S8M-5303 #131
DoubleEagle
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« Reply #19 on: October 13, 2017, 08:09:36 AM »

It really sounds like you need to get that bus home if at all possible. I would price the cost of having it towed or put on a Landall from several sources to see how expensive it really is. As has been said by buswarrior, there will be a way to wrestle that bus in to the back. Any piece of equipment that can lift the front end can shove it around and get it in, or something with a heavy-enough winch could drag it back. You don't have to worry about damaging the front end, and the lawn can be repaired, or wait for winter and slide it in.  Wink
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Walter
Dayton, Ohio
1975 Silvereagle Model 05, 8V71, 4 speed Spicer
1982 Eagle Model 10, 6V92, 5 speed Spicer
1984 Eagle Model 10, 6V92 w/Jacobs, Allison HT740
richard5933
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« Reply #20 on: October 13, 2017, 12:15:04 PM »

Without doubt I'd prefer to get the bus home if possible.

Not sure if there is a way to get the towed bus into our driveway though. Our place is on a two-lane county highway. No shoulder, ditches on both sides of pavement. I use both lanes to turn in/out of our driveway with a 35-foot bus under the best of circumstances due to obstacles building w/in 4 feet of pavement. If I can't get it to my place, then the next best would be to find a storage yard in the area where I can park it without paying too much.

I've started calling tow companies I work with here in Wisconsin, but a 35-foot bus is larger than they usually handle on their low-boy. Now I'm just starting to cold-call companies in our area whose websites indicate they may be able to help.

Then I've got to put pencil to paper and see if this all will make sense fiscally. I know that there is lots of value in the bus, especially in the larger items like the engine, transmission, genset, etc. Add all the other unobtainable pieces to be parted out and the value adds up. But, even if I can get it here, and even if I can find a place to store the old bus, and even if it doesn't cost too much, I've still got to figure out how to pull the parts from the carcass. My little utility tractor is not up to the task, my forklift is older than the bus and was barely able to lift the genset at my shop, let alone the engine (and it would just sink in the gravel yard at my home), and I'll have to add the cost of rented equipment to the mix when I crunch the numbers.

Bottom line, I'd like to keep the bus for the parts I need and to make the other parts available to others, but I'm just not sure yet how to make it happen.

Anybody in the Midwest that wants to lend a hand/storage space in exchange for parts?

Richard

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Richard
1974 GMC P8M4108a-125 (Current Bus)
1964 GM PD4106-2412
Located in beautiful Wisconsin
KD9GRB
j.m.jackson
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« Reply #21 on: October 13, 2017, 12:27:39 PM »

Richard:

On the equipment and what not to dismantle the bus, think outside the box. I live and work on my bus on gravel. If I had to pull the engine, there's no way I could lift it, all I have is a front end loader mounted on a JD garden tractor, a 2 ton hoist, a 3 ton floor jack, and a 20T bottle jack. If I had to pull it, I would back the bus up to my shop (barn), drop the engine, and pull the bus away from it. Heavy pipe and chain attached to front axle and the wife's chevy suburban SUV to move it. Ground is fairly level there. I'd also hook up shop air to run the bags and brakes.

How bad was the steering damaged? Can you rig it up to steer / have brakes so you can move it under its own power? May help LOTS to get it to it's storage location on your property.
« Last Edit: October 13, 2017, 12:32:10 PM by j.m.jackson » Logged

1969 GMC S8M-5303 #131
richard5933
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« Reply #22 on: October 13, 2017, 12:55:11 PM »

How bad was the damage?

The impact happened under the driver's seat. Took out the air brakes, air suspension system, and steering. Shoved the front left wheel back to the bulkhead.

I don't think it will be moving under its own power in the near future.

Richard

1974 GMC P8M4108A125 (Current bus)
1964 GM PD4106 (totalled Sept 2017)
Located in beautiful Wisconsin
KD9GRB
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Richard
1974 GMC P8M4108a-125 (Current Bus)
1964 GM PD4106-2412
Located in beautiful Wisconsin
KD9GRB
j.m.jackson
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« Reply #23 on: October 13, 2017, 01:35:31 PM »

That's pretty ugly, and terrible for controls. Aux tank right there, PP valve, brake valve and throttle, steering right angle box. The radius arm and sway bar are right there, the frame member and front axle front bulkhead must have been shifted back to affect the axle geometry that way.
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1969 GMC S8M-5303 #131
richard5933
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« Reply #24 on: October 13, 2017, 02:04:27 PM »

It was a pretty drastic impact, but surprisingly the majority of it was confined to this corner and the front of the bus. At least going by what's visible from the outside. I suspect that there is lots of structural damage internally though, as the skin in the driver's side is wavy about two-thirds of the way towards the rear.

All that said, there are still lots of good undamaged parts on this bus that I'd like to see saved from the crusher.

Richard
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Richard
1974 GMC P8M4108a-125 (Current Bus)
1964 GM PD4106-2412
Located in beautiful Wisconsin
KD9GRB
brmax
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« Reply #25 on: October 13, 2017, 02:07:13 PM »

It will take more than the standard haul rate, as that would be a rolling chassis.  If one cannot do much of the work themselves to lift and make Rolling then its easy to figure cost. A lot!
If one tries to do this in basic figure and that always to cheap is: Wisconsin to Iowa fuel in pickup and 3 days hotel with food 500. Then repairing the brakes to realese, so to roll. A problem i see at first glance and i cannot see much. So then say a wrecker for lifting front, in short order 500. so low deck trailer can be used to haul 2000.00“maybe” ( something lifting and moving this at the destination is required ) Then storage cost or that paperwork.

Best regards
Floyd
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luvrbus
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« Reply #26 on: October 13, 2017, 02:24:29 PM »

I have no idea what parts he is trying to save, a 8v71 with 150,000 miles with a V730 you are lucky to get 1000 bucks ,there is not much demand for a generator with the old Perkins diesel, with the hauling dismantling and paying $3500 for the bus.
 I personally don't see the advantage plus his new bus is a different model and not much is going to benefit him in the way of parts I know the engine cradle is different so that shoots down the easy engine swap BTDT and the 4108 he has now is 24v so the starter and alternator are not much good to him except for resale 
« Last Edit: October 13, 2017, 02:30:58 PM by luvrbus » Logged

Life is short drink the good wine first
richard5933
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« Reply #27 on: October 13, 2017, 02:58:51 PM »

I have no idea what parts he is trying to save, a 8v71 with 150,000 miles with a V730 you are lucky to get 1000 bucks ,there is not much demand for a generator with the old Perkins diesel, with the hauling dismantling and paying $3500 for the bus.
 I personally don't see the advantage plus his new bus is a different model and not much is going to benefit him in the way of parts I know the engine cradle is different so that shoots down the easy engine swap BTDT and the 4108 he has now is 24v so the starter and alternator are not much good to him except for resale 

I understand what you're saying, and the costs for doing this are starting to point towards field stripping as much as possible from the bus where it sits and then letting it go.

Question: How difficult is it to field strip the Jacobs Engine Brakes from the 8V71? The old bus has Jakes, the new one doesn't. If the necessary parts are interchangeable, does it make sense to pull them from the old bus? If this is practical, then where do I find a 'Flield Guide To Removing Jakes"?

Aside from the Jakes, I could easily field strip all the electronics, interior LED lighting, audio system, etc. as well as the Trojan batteries. The Perkins may not have value, but the new 13kw head does. Too bad it's not situated in a place that makes field stripping easy. Guess I could also remove the bay doors as well if someone needs them.

Richard

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Richard
1974 GMC P8M4108a-125 (Current Bus)
1964 GM PD4106-2412
Located in beautiful Wisconsin
KD9GRB
luvrbus
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« Reply #28 on: October 13, 2017, 03:10:21 PM »

Jakes are easy to remove takes a 3/4 socket for the bolts and a 1/2 wrench for the lines pop the body loose and grab the bridges (Cool that is the most important item for a 71 series,save the long oil bolts and valve covers too then grab the buffer switch if it has one there is a pass through plastic nut on each head those are nice to save but new ones are cheap     
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Life is short drink the good wine first
richard5933
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« Reply #29 on: October 13, 2017, 03:13:47 PM »

I assume that the Jakes are on both heads. Can both be accessed from the engine bay?

Anywhere you can point me to see this in photos? I don't have a clear picture of what it is I'm removing.

Richard
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Richard
1974 GMC P8M4108a-125 (Current Bus)
1964 GM PD4106-2412
Located in beautiful Wisconsin
KD9GRB
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