Bus Conversions dot Com Bulletin Board
December 21, 2014, 12:29:29 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: If you had an Online Subscription:  It will not get lost in the mail.
   Home   Help Forum Rules Search Calendar Login Register BCM Home Page Contact BCM  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Haven't seen this generater discussed  (Read 1565 times)
NewbeeMC9
NewbeeMC9
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1167


1981 MC9 8V71, HT 740




Ignore
« on: February 01, 2007, 03:59:36 AM »


http://www.knowledgepublications.com/announce/01252007.htm

who's gonna set up a Hydrogen bay?

Anybody done this?


Logged

It's all fun and games til someone gets hurt. Wink
kyle4501
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3153


PD4501 South Carolina




Ignore
« Reply #1 on: February 01, 2007, 05:01:54 AM »

Has any one else heard anything about hydrogen & the Hindenberg?





 Grin
« Last Edit: February 01, 2007, 06:05:32 AM by kyle4501 » Logged

I know you believe you understand what you think I said, but I am not sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant. (R.M. Nixon)
Jeremy
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1914


1987 Bedford Plaxton


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #2 on: February 01, 2007, 05:03:53 AM »

My Mum does silversmithing for a hobby, and has a hydrogen-producing machine to provide fuel for her tiny blowtorch (apparently you cannot get really small flames with butane or the other fuels usually used in blowtorches). The machine uses electricity and water to produce hydrogen, and your generator uses hydrogen to produce electricity. So you could run your coach on water!

Jeremy
Logged

A shameless plug for my business - visit www.magazineexchange.co.uk for back issue magazines - thousands of titles covering cars, motorbikes, aircraft, railways, boats, modelling etc. You'll find lots of interest, although not much covering American buses sadly.
Dallas
Guest

« Reply #3 on: February 01, 2007, 05:27:09 AM »

Has any one else heard anything about anout hydrogen & the Hindenberg?





 Grin

One of the downfalls (NPI) of the Hindenberg was that the bags were built to use helium, which only the United States made at the time. The United States refused to sell any helium to the Germans because it was considered a war material.

Hydrogen used knwledgably is no more dangrous than say, that stuff they run the new aircraft carriers and submarines with. Roll Eyes

As a matter of fact, the Germans have a submarine that uses hydrogen. Roll Eyes
« Last Edit: February 01, 2007, 05:34:21 AM by Dallas » Logged
Jeremy
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1914


1987 Bedford Plaxton


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #4 on: February 01, 2007, 05:41:16 AM »

I believe that it has been proved that the Hindenburg disaster was actually due to the extremely flamable reflective silver paint the airship was coated with; on 'grounding' with the mooring tower a spark of static electricity ignited the paint and the fabric skin of the airship, which in turn ignited hydrogen leaking from the gas bags. Then things really went wrong.

"Oh, the humanity"

Jeremy
Logged

A shameless plug for my business - visit www.magazineexchange.co.uk for back issue magazines - thousands of titles covering cars, motorbikes, aircraft, railways, boats, modelling etc. You'll find lots of interest, although not much covering American buses sadly.
Ross
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 406


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #5 on: February 01, 2007, 06:36:14 AM »

The problem iss that it takes LOTS of both water and electricity to make enough hydrogen to be useful as a genset fuel.  Both are usually in short supply on a bus.  Even as an auto fuel, it is not a cost effective alternative, just a more enviromentally friendly alternative.

Ross
Logged
Jeremy
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1914


1987 Bedford Plaxton


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #6 on: February 01, 2007, 07:05:56 AM »

The problem iss that it takes LOTS of both water and electricity to make enough hydrogen to be useful as a genset fuel.  Both are usually in short supply on a bus.  Even as an auto fuel, it is not a cost effective alternative, just a more enviromentally friendly alternative.

Ross

Not even 'environmentally friendly' strictly speaking (since more fuel is ultimately used), just 'lower emissions at point of use'. Same is true of electric cars, catalytic converters, and lots of other things we are told are 'envronmentally friendly'. If the electricity used was generated without the use of fossil fuels then there would be a net gain.

My Mum's hydrogen machine doesn't use much electrical power, but then it only needs to produce a relatively tiny amount of gas.

I heard a statistic once that said that more energy is typically used to build a car than that car will ever use during it's lifetime. I dont know if that is really true, but it sounds feasible when you consider everything involved in the mining, refining and transporting of the steel, aluminium, plastics etc involved as well as all the energy consumed by the car manufacturing plants and all their suppliers. If it is true then the most 'environmentally friendly' thing we can all do is drive around in old, overbuilt, understressed, gas guzzling cars (and buses), and pass a law to force Ford, GM, Toyota and all the others to sack 95% of their staff and close down all their plants apart from their spare-parts divisions. Strange how I've never heard a politian propose that though.

Jeremy
Logged

A shameless plug for my business - visit www.magazineexchange.co.uk for back issue magazines - thousands of titles covering cars, motorbikes, aircraft, railways, boats, modelling etc. You'll find lots of interest, although not much covering American buses sadly.
TomC
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 6974





Ignore
« Reply #7 on: February 01, 2007, 08:28:25 AM »

Strange how things work sometimes.  I read somewhere (can't remember where) that running hydrogen directly in an internal combustion engine is not friendly on the atmoshpere.  It has to do with either creating or distroying ice crystals high up that opens up a hole in the ozone layer (maybe someone knows more).  I have heard that using hydrogen in a fuel cell is good though.  Good Luck, TomC
Logged

Tom & Donna Christman. '77 AMGeneral 10240B; 8V-71TATAIC V730.
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.18 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!