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Author Topic: Do you carry a spare tire?  (Read 3452 times)
dtcerrato
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« Reply #15 on: November 25, 2017, 05:47:23 AM »

We always carried a good spare tire behind the bumper and changed it a few times in almost 40 years of road tripping with the bus.
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Dan & Sandy
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Geoff
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« Reply #16 on: November 25, 2017, 06:19:28 AM »

I've been carrying a mounted spare for 15+ years along with the tools to change a tire.  I never have needed it.  The tire was used when I bought it, so I don't know how long it would hold up.  I am on the lookout for a newer spare but have had no luck.  It sure takes up a lot of space and is heavy.
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Geoff
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luvrbus
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« Reply #17 on: November 25, 2017, 06:37:05 AM »

Speaking of carrying the heavy @$# impact gun I saw a tire guy changing a flat tire on a bus with a cordless impact gun. I never knew those guns could produce enough torque to remove and replace the lug nuts on a bus or truck 
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Ed Hackenbruch
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« Reply #18 on: November 25, 2017, 07:11:59 AM »

I used a 1/2 inch Ingersoll Rand air gun, it worked just fine for taking off the lug nuts. Smiley 
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1968 MCI 5A with 8V71 and Allison MT644 transmission.  Western USA
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« Reply #19 on: November 25, 2017, 07:29:39 AM »

I used a 1/2 inch Ingersoll Rand air gun, it worked just fine for taking off the lug nuts. Smiley 


 A 1/2 inch drive I/R is all I ever used for years 
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dtcerrato
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« Reply #20 on: November 25, 2017, 07:32:04 AM »

Didn't realize a 1/2" pneumatic would do the bus lugs. I have heard of the higher voltage (24+) being able to do the task. We been carrying a 3/4" Chicago Pneumatic forever. It does a lot more than just the lug nuts. Its got (also the bus) the electric portable compressor to back it up... We're just full of air! Haha
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Dan & Sandy
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« Reply #21 on: November 25, 2017, 07:53:46 AM »

Because of the weight of the rim, when I find a new spare, I think I will just carry my tire irons and slide hammer and carry the spare unmounted.  I bought the above a couple of years ago when the tire shop wanted $100 apiece to mount the new tires for my bus.  The ties are not that hard to mount.  Plus road service can do it if I'm not up to the task.
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Geoff
'82 RTS AZ
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« Reply #22 on: November 25, 2017, 08:14:50 AM »

  Because of the weight of the rim, when I find a new spare, I think I will just carry my tire irons and slide hammer and carry the spare unmounted.  I bought the above a couple of years ago when the tire shop wanted $100 apiece to mount the new tires for my bus.  The ties are not that hard to mount.  Plus road service can do it if I'm not up to the task. 

     That brings up a point of ignorance on my part, Geoff -- maybe you can give me a little info.  I keep a mounted, balance spare in my car -- I think I've used it once in 15 years and 450,000 miles and that was because I had a piece of broken spring in a tire on the ground; it was holding air OK (going down from 34 to 24 pounds overnight) and I could have aired it up and driven to the tire shop for a $6 clean and plug but I felt better putting the dependable spare down for that.  On any motorcycle, if I had a flat on the road, I fixed it with tube and tools I carried but I balanced it ASAconvenient. 
      If you're changing a tire on the side of the road (or paying/using FMCA or Coach-Net) -- or mounting new tires in your shop, how much does balance come into consideration?  Like most other things,  things are different of Heavy-duty equipment versus the light-vehicle items I'm more familiar with.
      Thanks for your help on this,   BH
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Bruce H; Wallace (near Wilmington) NC
1976 Daimler (British) Double-Decker Bus; 34' long
6-cyl, 4-stroke, Leyland O-680 engine

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« Reply #23 on: November 25, 2017, 08:30:54 AM »

There are many instances of professional tire guys being crushed to death changing a tire on the side of the road. I drove truck for 21 years, sold trucks for 15 years, now retired. I would never change a tire myself. Too heavy a vehicle to play with.
Roadside service trucks are everywhere. Have a flat-call one of them. Then you don't have to carry an extra tire, rim, wrenches and hydraulic jacks. Perhaps the only place I would carry a spare is going to remote parts of Canada or Alaska. Good Luck, TomC
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Tom & Donna Christman. '77 AMGeneral 10240B; 8V-71TATAIC V730.
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« Reply #24 on: November 25, 2017, 08:43:51 AM »

I don't plan on carrying a spare. IF I do carry tools for the job and IF I feel the need to put my back out, I would just single out one of the drive wheels to any position I need to get me to a service station to repair/replace the bad tire. IF not then like Tom says, a simple phone call will do it, which will probably be what happens.
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Jim Eh.
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Jeremy
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« Reply #25 on: November 25, 2017, 09:21:12 AM »

I carry a spare because my bus came with one (and a winch to lift it), and a bottle jack and wheel brace. The jack especially is adequate but no more, just like the OEM jacks you get with a car. I've changed an outer dual myself with no issues but would be nervous about attempting to change a front wheel or inner dual on the side of the road

Jeremy
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« Reply #26 on: November 25, 2017, 10:04:41 AM »

     That brings up a point of ignorance on my part, Geoff -- maybe you can give me a little info.  I keep a mounted, balance spare in my car -- I think I've used it once in 15 years and 450,000 miles and that was because I had a piece of broken spring in a tire on the ground; it was holding air OK (going down from 34 to 24 pounds overnight) and I could have aired it up and driven to the tire shop for a $6 clean and plug but I felt better putting the dependable spare down for that.  On any motorcycle, if I had a flat on the road, I fixed it with tube and tools I carried but I balanced it ASAconvenient. 
      If you're changing a tire on the side of the road (or paying/using FMCA or Coach-Net) -- or mounting new tires in your shop, how much does balance come into consideration?  Like most other things,  things are different of Heavy-duty equipment versus the light-vehicle items I'm more familiar with.
      Thanks for your help on this,   BH

The general consensus on big truck and bus wheels is that they don't need to be balanced.  I have run my bus 90mph on unbalanced tires and never noticed any wheel bounce.  People do balance them, but alot don't.
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Geoff
'82 RTS AZ
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« Reply #27 on: November 25, 2017, 10:14:40 AM »

Everyone should at least carry an unmounted tire.  If you damage a tire beyond repair the road guys will gouge big time for a new tire.  And while I am willing to change a tire myself, it would have to be parked safely. 
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Geoff
'82 RTS AZ
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« Reply #28 on: November 25, 2017, 12:03:00 PM »

So many opinions, nice. Means I can do whatever and be in agreement with at least someone. LOL

I'm carrying a spare and don't see any logic or reason not to have one ready to swap if required. Just seems it minimizes delays, mixups, costs, etc. while on the road. If that space was needed for some other use, then one needs to weigh out the pros/cons.
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Don F
1976 MCI/TMC MC-8 #1286
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Geoff
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« Reply #29 on: November 25, 2017, 12:21:14 PM »

UPDATE
I looked on Craigslist and found 6 used 315 80r 22.5 tires, the size I use.  I'm going to look at them this afternoon
  They have tread, but I need to look at the date code and for cracks

Okay, I looked at the tires and they were Michelin XZA tires with 3/4 of the thread left, no cracks or plugs, came off a Prevost.  Nine years old, better than what I had, so I bought one for a hundred bucks.  Good enough for a spare.

--Geoff
« Last Edit: November 25, 2017, 05:05:38 PM by Geoff » Logged

Geoff
'82 RTS AZ
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