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Author Topic: Do you carry a spare tire?  (Read 3356 times)
luvrbus
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« Reply #90 on: November 30, 2017, 02:07:59 PM »

Clifford. You probably know this already. But there was a fully mounted spare behind the front bumper.


Not any longer once I got the heavy sucker out no way was I putting it back Grin,I have Alcoa wheels and Kanes covers on it now looks pretty good 
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Oonrahnjay
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« Reply #91 on: November 30, 2017, 02:17:59 PM »

...  Take note of that last photo.i borrowed his tools and his heft to make this happen. ... 

       Wow, Scott.  That's got to be a 6' lever arm and over 250 pounds of force!  Did you really need 1500 pounds of torque to break the nuts loose?  If I had, I would be checking all the studs for stretching and cracking.  You're scaring me here.
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Bruce H; Wallace (near Wilmington) NC
1976 Daimler (British) Double-Decker Bus; 34' long
6-cyl, 4-stroke, Leyland O-680 engine

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gumpy
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« Reply #92 on: November 30, 2017, 03:23:56 PM »

And that appears to be after taking the hot wrench to it!
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Craig Shepard
Located in Minnesquito

http://bus.gumpydog.com - "Some Assembly Required"
chessie4905
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« Reply #93 on: November 30, 2017, 04:56:35 PM »

The springiness of the pipe and probably the breaker bar absorbs a lot of the torque. Use a 1 inch drive breaker bar, proper impact socket, and stiffer pipe, and it'll come loose a lot easier. Btdt.
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GMC h8h 649#028 (4905)
Pennsylvania-central
Scott & Heather
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« Reply #94 on: November 30, 2017, 05:26:48 PM »

Lol. Those ones were hard as heck to get loose. Thatís why I believe in antiseize. I donít own that bus anymore. Its someone elseís baby now.


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Scott & Heather
1984 MCI 9 6V92-turbo with 9 inch roof raise (SOLD)
1992 MCI 102C3 8v92-turbo with 8 inch roof raise CURRENT HOME
Click link for 900 photos of our 1st bus conversion:
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Geoff
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« Reply #95 on: November 30, 2017, 05:40:53 PM »

Does NeverSieze work when the lug nuts are gunned on to 1,000 ft lbs?
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Geoff
'82 RTS AZ
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« Reply #96 on: November 30, 2017, 08:10:38 PM »

Quote
Wow, Scott.  That's got to be a 6' lever arm and over 250 pounds of force!  Did you really need 1500 pounds of torque to break the nuts loose?  If I had, I would be checking all the studs for stretching and cracking.  You're scaring me here.
That is totally insane and blows my plan on using a 3ft breaker bar to get the lug nuts loose at around 450 lbs. Figured 150-200 pounds on a 3 ft bar would be plenty. Maybe have to go with the torque multiplier wrench.
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Don F
1976 MCI/TMC MC-8 #1286
Fully converted (June 2017)
luvrbus
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« Reply #97 on: November 30, 2017, 08:31:59 PM »

LOL that may not be 450 lbs tire guys hammer on the front studs with steel wheels 450 lbs is nothing for a 1-1/8th inch stud they will go 1500 ft lbs if the wheel doesn't break.The drive axle is a different story the 3/4in studs are at their limit at 450 lbs and break fairly easy
« Last Edit: November 30, 2017, 08:42:35 PM by luvrbus » Logged

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Geoff
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« Reply #98 on: December 01, 2017, 05:25:10 AM »

That is totally insane and blows my plan on using a 3ft breaker bar to get the lug nuts loose at around 450 lbs. Figured 150-200 pounds on a 3 ft bar would be plenty. Maybe have to go with the torque multiplier wrench.
I've used the torque multiplier several times on bus/truck or even RV lug nuts.  You need a helper to hold the socket in place since you still have to use a cheater bar and to move the socket to the next lug.  One time, on a bus front wheel, I didn't have a helper and had to use a 10 ft. Pipe with a 3/4" breaker bar and was barely able to break one particular nut loose.

--Geoff
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Geoff
'82 RTS AZ
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« Reply #99 on: December 01, 2017, 05:28:05 AM »

And if you have any kind of chrome hub covers/rings or hats you canít use the Torque Multiplier wrench. Ask me how I know. Anyone want to buy one? 🤔


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Scott & Heather
1984 MCI 9 6V92-turbo with 9 inch roof raise (SOLD)
1992 MCI 102C3 8v92-turbo with 8 inch roof raise CURRENT HOME
Click link for 900 photos of our 1st bus conversion:
https://goo.gl/photos/GVtNRniG2RBXPuXW9
Ed Hackenbruch
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« Reply #100 on: December 01, 2017, 07:07:39 AM »

What kind of torque multiplier are you guys using?  Never had to use a cheater bar with mine, never had to have somebody help me, never damaged the covers.   
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1968 MCI 5A with 8V71 and Allison MT644 transmission.  Western USA
Jim Eh.
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« Reply #101 on: December 01, 2017, 11:01:00 AM »

 That's real tight. Surprised the rachet held up. That is why I remove my wheel fastners every couple of years when I am at a place that makes it easy to do. Looks like he even gave up trying the 1" impact.
« Last Edit: December 01, 2017, 11:05:02 AM by Jim Eh. » Logged

Jim Eh.
1996 MC12
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Winnipeg, MB.
Scott & Heather
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« Reply #102 on: December 01, 2017, 12:15:10 PM »

Yeah. Even the shop I took it too blew up their 1Ē impact on my lugs. Someone overtightened them before I owned it.


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Scott & Heather
1984 MCI 9 6V92-turbo with 9 inch roof raise (SOLD)
1992 MCI 102C3 8v92-turbo with 8 inch roof raise CURRENT HOME
Click link for 900 photos of our 1st bus conversion:
https://goo.gl/photos/GVtNRniG2RBXPuXW9
Geoff
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« Reply #103 on: December 01, 2017, 01:04:31 PM »

The over tightening happens when the shop or Service Truck uses a huge compressor set at 175#,  a  1" air hose, and sets the one inch air gun at full power.  If they to do this to you, tell them to back up, and use a torque wrench at 440#.
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Geoff
'82 RTS AZ
Tony LEE
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« Reply #104 on: December 01, 2017, 03:28:17 PM »

No GoodSam in Australia so outback it is strictly DIY. Spare wheel behind the front bumper bar plus all the gear - including  about 12' of extension bars needed to get nuts loose.  Not a quick job, especially if it is an inside dual wheel so have two sets of nuts to loosen. Always happens on a dirt road on a stinking hot day but good thing about having a conversion is there is always a hot shower, clean clothes and a cool drink at the end.
Also have tag chains so in total have three spare wheels and if in a real bind, there is always the option of using an outside dual wheel and pumping the inside one up to maximum allowable and driving slowly for 150 miles to get to the next tyre shop..

Tighten a nut up to 450 ft-lbs, leave it for a few years and 450 ft lbs is not going to get it loose any time soon. Hence the 12' of bar and a big man sitting on the end. Bet he was actually bouncing up and down on the bar rather than just sitting on it.

I also have an adjustable stand to support the outer end of the tube spanner so there is no sideways force between the socket and the nut, just torque. Saves it all slipping off the nut just as you stand on the end of the bar.



For those who think lubricating threads doesn't alter the stretch applied to the stud, for a given torque, the difference in resulting tension in the stud can be three to one between lubricated and non-lubricated. If you want proof, try pushing a heavy weight up an incline with and without grease between the weight and the incline. Throw in an ignorant tyre jockey armed with a BIG rattle gun and a big pail full of goop that he applies with gay abandon, and the amazing thing is that more studs don't break right off.
« Last Edit: December 01, 2017, 03:58:58 PM by Tony LEE » Logged

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