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Author Topic: Would you know what to do if your bus tipped over?  (Read 776 times)
Jeremy
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« on: November 30, 2017, 04:15:52 AM »

I'm surprised that this is considered a likely-enough scenario to be worth training for, but apparently in France and Belgium it is:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/av/world-europe-42172177/would-you-know-what-to-do-if-your-bus-tipped-over


Jeremy
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« Reply #1 on: November 30, 2017, 07:29:55 AM »

I drive group tours for Transportation Charter Services. The first thing we do on the first day of a tour, is show a safety video that explains, among other things, how to open the emergency exits (windows and roof hatches) in case of a roll over. It also suggests and encourages the use of the seat belts. Although that is not mandatory. Like on a flight, it is standard operating procedure that is not uncommon in the industry now. The 5 minute video also covers other safety features like fire extinguishers, and how to hang on to the rail along the parcel racks and the seats when walking around while the bus is in motion. I always explained all that, but now you just press a button on the dash and the video just plays, simple and easy, and the head office knows if you don't play it and you get notified. Lawyers? lol.

JC   
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JC
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« Reply #2 on: November 30, 2017, 07:41:55 AM »

Just before leaving on our last trip with our 4106 I had the thought of double-checking to be sure that everything that could be tied down was. I even installed extra straps on the batteries to hold them in place. Thankfully we did not roll over, but we came close. Other than a few cabinet doors that popped open and some lightweight things that moved around, nothing went flying or became a projectile.

The point I'm trying to make is how important it is to be prepared for these types of things. You never know when something will go catastrophically wrong in a hurry. Good reminder to take appropriate precautionary steps before leaving home and to review emergency procedures with everyone that is boarding the bus.
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Richard
1974 GMC P8M4108a-125 (Current Bus)
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Scott & Heather
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« Reply #3 on: November 30, 2017, 10:43:36 AM »

Thatís actually pretty cool. But in the event of an actual crash, thereís trauma, impact, noise and other things that would just be overwhelming to those kids so I can necessarily buy that itís effective training and creates a ďreflexĒ but I suppose it doesnít hurt and gives them some level of readiness. Letís just not roll over people. Itís bad news in a Bus.


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Scott & Heather
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Jeremy
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« Reply #4 on: November 30, 2017, 01:08:41 PM »

Thatís actually pretty cool. But in the event of an actual crash, thereís trauma, impact, noise and other things that would just be overwhelming to those kids so I can necessarily buy that itís effective training and creates a ďreflexĒ but I suppose it doesnít hurt and gives them some level of readiness.

Those were exactly my own thoughts too - but one thing did make an impression on me, which was the fact that the seatbelts kept the kids fully in their seats even though the bus was on it's side, enabling them to then make a controlled (and injury-free) descent in their own time. I think that would still largely be the case even if the roll-over was much more violent and accompanied by screaming and screeching metal

The other thing that's for certain is that we never got to do cool stuff like this when I was at school.. Roll Eyes

Jeremy
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Geoff
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« Reply #5 on: November 30, 2017, 01:27:56 PM »

When people convert buses the roof hatches are usually lost, and a lot of times the factory emergency window frames are no longer operable.  Roof airs went over my roof hatches, but I kept the emergency window releases in place.  Those windows are heavy, it may be a problem opening them when (if) the bus is on it's side.  Something I always had on my mind was if there was a fire at the front of the bus so the emergency windows work in the bedroom as well as the front.
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Geoff
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« Reply #6 on: November 30, 2017, 01:55:02 PM »

Jeremy, true that. I agree with you, those kids were held pretty well with lap belts. Geoff, itís occurred to me too. That glass is stupid heavy. I would never be able to push it open if the coach were on its side.


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Scott & Heather
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Jeremy
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« Reply #7 on: November 30, 2017, 03:42:19 PM »

The windows in my bus aren't designed to be opened as such but instead have 'Break glass in emergency" stickers on them, with little hammers provided for the purpose! Fine in theory no doubt but with the bus on it's side I dare say it wouldn't be much fun trying to climb up and bash your way through a large double-glazed window above your head. The bus does also have a rear escape door and roof hatches though

Jeremy
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Iceni John
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« Reply #8 on: November 30, 2017, 07:20:44 PM »

That's why I'm keeping both my roof hatches, and the emergency rear door in what will be the bedroom, and the emergency rear window.   All my side windows open 12", but I may not be able to shimmy through that small a gap.

Do US long-distance buses have seatbelts at every seat?   I was on an ADO bus in Mexico when the driver walked through just before departure to check that everyone was belted in!

That video reminds me of when I had to do helicopter crash training before working in the North Sea  -  a simulated helicopter cabin was slowly lowered into (very cold) water in a training pool, rotated until upside down, then lowered another few feet until the emergency exits were well under water.   We had to practice exiting it until everybody could get out in less than half a minute, and when we could all do that our instructors made it more interesting by blindfolding us so we had to do it by feel alone.   I guess it was fun?

John  
« Last Edit: November 30, 2017, 08:37:38 PM by Iceni John » Logged

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« Reply #9 on: December 01, 2017, 10:39:14 AM »

The only windows that still open completely out are on the passenger side so if I rolled over on that side no way out windows or door. I did keep roof hatches and put drop down opening screens on the roof hatches they let hot air out and keep bugs out. For air conditioners I framed in and cut new holes.
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Steve Canzellarini
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« Reply #10 on: December 01, 2017, 11:17:18 AM »

Kinda Bus Conversion related.  Friends would look and laugh at the extreme methods to keep all the otherwise loose things bolted and heavily strapped down inside our old hot dog ski boat.

Everything was heavily bolted down.  The batteries, the seats, first aid kit, flares, life vests, the ice chest, everything was heavily secured, padded or had heavy positive latches to open and close.  

No seat belts.  There were times when the high speed ride in rough lake conditions bounced us around hard.  We were never flung out but came close.  Nothing inside other than us could move.

Kinda related?  Dunno.  An old 18 foot Howard.  Stock 427 heavy truck engine.  Cascale V drive.  Had a reverse gear too.  Do about 60 with the speed prop.  About 50 with the ski power prop.  Very Fun.
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TomC
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« Reply #11 on: December 03, 2017, 08:03:32 AM »

This is what makes me nervous about some of the conversions here. I see no windows in the rear part of the bus, maybe the roof escape hatches now with A/C's in them. Just wonder how you'd escape a front fire if you were in the bedroom?
I have large windows (39" tall) in the bedroom and in front that can be either opened or kicked out. But-with my low transit bus (11ft over the A/C's) I think I'd be hard pressed to lay it over. And considering I never laid over my big rig truck in 21 years and 1.3 million miles of driving, I'm too worried about it. Good Luck, TomC
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Tom & Donna Christman. '77 AMGeneral 10240B; 8V-71TATAIC V730.
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« Reply #12 on: December 03, 2017, 09:42:04 AM »

This is what makes me nervous about some of the conversions here. I see no windows in the rear part of the bus, maybe the roof escape hatches now with A/C's in them. Just wonder how you'd escape a front fire if you were in the bedroom?
I have large windows (39" tall) in the bedroom and in front that can be either opened or kicked out. But-with my low transit bus (11ft over the A/C's) I think I'd be hard pressed to lay it over. And considering I never laid over my big rig truck in 21 years and 1.3 million miles of driving, I'm too worried about it. Good Luck, TomC

The idea of planting the concept in minds that a bus can tip over and that escape can be more difficult is probably a good idea. It happens rarely, just like plane crashes and cars into water, but how people react and take action is crucial to survival. I think we should all survey our own situations to think about what we would do if it happened. It seems to me that it would be critical that there be escape openings on each side of the coach as well as on the roof. It would also be necessary to be able to reach the openings that might also end up being 7 1/2 - 8 ft. above where you are standing, which points to roof hatches being the most important exit of all.
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Walter
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Scott & Heather
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« Reply #13 on: December 03, 2017, 01:44:07 PM »

We donít have rear windows yet but do have the roof hatch. If we roll on our roof, we can get out one of the side windows in front or the windshields. If thereís a fire, we is all gonna broil on the high setting.


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Scott & Heather
1984 MCI 9 6V92-turbo with 9 inch roof raise (SOLD)
1992 MCI 102C3 8v92-turbo with 8 inch roof raise CURRENT HOME
Click link for 900 photos of our 1st bus conversion:
https://goo.gl/photos/GVtNRniG2RBXPuXW9
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« Reply #14 on: December 03, 2017, 02:58:24 PM »

I don't know what I would do if I had to get out of my bus when it tipped over-----but I have had a bit of "rollover" training--courtesy of all the US Taxpayers.

It is difficult to get out of an upside down HMMV or MRAP alone with all your gear on, and then preparing to exit while possibly receiving enemy fire.

I did learn very directly that an unsecured metal ammo can inside can ring your bell when it hits you while you are rolling.

I am now somewhat anal retentive about securing everything inside my bus while travelling.

 Grin

Steve


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Steve Toomey
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