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Author Topic: Summit Fridge  (Read 4311 times)
Jerry Liebler
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« Reply #15 on: February 06, 2007, 11:33:22 AM »

If you are concerned with how long it will cool on battery power then you need to shop for the lowest energy usage.  All refrigerators have, because of fedral law, a sticker giving the kilowatt hours consumed per year.  Lower is better!  If you want a fairly large refrigerator, check out the Avanti 1201w-1, 11cu ft,  it is rated to consume 277KWh/year which equates to an aveage of 31.62 watts.  A litle (8.7 cu ft).,  but without much freezer space is the Avanti RM901W which at 230 kwh/year or about 26.25 watts average, is getting right down with Sunfrost.   I chose to go even smaller but with a much larger freezer behind a second door I chose the Avanti  651 wt1 (I actually got the ss653 which is the stainless version).  This is only a 6.3 cu ft unit but it's plenty for my use and its rated draw is 254 kwh/yr or about 29 watts average.  After I got mine I ran it overnight through a "Kil-a-watt" power measuring toy.  I recorded an average use of 26 watts over 24 hours.  Then I added insulation, 1" to the back, sides and bottom and 1 1/2" to the top.  I had to relocate the compressor and remount the coils on the back.  I used 1/2" sheets of 'Rmax" (r7/ inch) material and glued it on and taped all the seams.  After adding the insulation I did another 24 hour run and recorded an average of 19 watts.  So adding insulation is very much worth the effort.
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Jerry 4107 1120
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belfert
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« Reply #16 on: February 06, 2007, 11:56:58 AM »

Brian,

If you can work up a cad drawling to be able to send to me, I can fabricate anything to spec.

A door is a door, it's not rocket science... or it can be if you want some star trek kinda door

No, it isn't rocket science to make a door, but you do have to have the tools and skills to use them.  I don't own a welder nor have I used one since high school shop class.  I probably will get one once my bus garage gets built, but it will take time to get good with one..

This door project isn't quite as simple as just building the door either since the hole on the bus has to framed in somewhat.  I don't have a problem paying to get this done.  I just need to find someone to do it.

Busted Knuckle AKA Bryce Gaston has a local guy that does really good metal work, but I've been trying to get a price from him since November.  I don't have as much a problem driving down to Tennessee as to Delaware.

This is way off topic and should be taken to PMs I suppose.

Brian Elfert
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Don4107
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« Reply #17 on: February 06, 2007, 02:21:03 PM »

If you are concerned with how long it will cool on battery power then you need to shop for the lowest energy usage.  All refrigerators have, because of fedral law, a sticker giving the kilowatt hours consumed per year.  Lower is better!  If you want a fairly large refrigerator, check out the Avanti 1201w-1, 11cu ft,  it is rated to consume 277KWh/year which equates to an aveage of 31.62 watts.  A litle (8.7 cu ft).,  but without much freezer space is the Avanti RM901W which at 230 kwh/year or about 26.25 watts average, is getting right down with Sunfrost.   I chose to go even smaller but with a much larger freezer behind a second door I chose the Avanti  651 wt1 (I actually got the ss653 which is the stainless version).  This is only a 6.3 cu ft unit but it's plenty for my use and its rated draw is 254 kwh/yr or about 29 watts average.  After I got mine I ran it overnight through a "Kil-a-watt" power measuring toy.  I recorded an average use of 26 watts over 24 hours.  Then I added insulation, 1" to the back, sides and bottom and 1 1/2" to the top.  I had to relocate the compressor and remount the coils on the back.  I used 1/2" sheets of 'Rmax" (r7/ inch) material and glued it on and taped all the seams.  After adding the insulation I did another 24 hour run and recorded an average of 19 watts.  So adding insulation is very much worth the effort.
Regards
Jerry 4107 1120

Wow, Jerry

Just goes to show what a little thought and work can get you.  That is a major increase in efficiency.  Separating and putting more insulation between the compressor/coils and the box makes sense. 

How did you move the compressor and coils?  Did you open the sealed system.  I have done some sealed system work and still have the tools.  Maybe moving the compressor and condenser coils to a bay besides making the refer more efficient would remove the heat load from the AC system too. The box could then be super insulated and approach Sunfrost type performance for cheep.  Food for thought.

  I may have to rethink my intended use of a RV fridge.  At this point I am just not sure how much boondocking we might want to do.  Thanks for the info.

Don 4107-501
« Last Edit: February 06, 2007, 02:22:32 PM by DrivingMissLazy » Logged

Don 4107 Eastern Washington
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H3Jim
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« Reply #18 on: February 06, 2007, 04:31:50 PM »

I have a friend, bus nut, that bought a side by side refrigerator for his coach and is in the process of installing the legendary Danfoss compressors in it.  He will run off 24 volts and expects above average effiiciency.  He is also super insulating the back and sides and top.  In the mean time its a great pantry.
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Jim Stewart
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« Reply #19 on: February 06, 2007, 04:43:51 PM »

Jim, did I get this right, he's purchased a "normal" household fridge, cut the stock compresor out and is installing a Danfoss?
Interesting idea.
 Nick, any nasties you can think of in doing this?  For me there's a good chance if I do this I'd get a much better
size match for what I want in a fridge, for less money than buying a Tundra or Novakool... verrrrry interesting idea...
Gary
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1962 Crown
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« Reply #20 on: February 06, 2007, 04:49:53 PM »

Gary, yes that's exactly what he did, is doing.

Ron Walker, 1998 H3-45

Before he completes it, he is currenty using a danfoss in an ice chest.  That sounds like a solution thats right up your alley.
« Last Edit: February 06, 2007, 04:52:33 PM by H3Jim » Logged

Jim Stewart
El Cajon, Ca.  (San Diego area)

Travel is more than the seeing of sights, it is a change that goes on, deep  and permanent, in the ideas of living.
Dreamscape
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« Reply #21 on: February 06, 2007, 05:23:22 PM »

Nick,

What are the dimensions, they look real nice. Where did you get them?

Happy Trails,

Paul

Dreamscape
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Nick Badame Refrig/ACC
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« Reply #22 on: February 06, 2007, 05:56:30 PM »

Jim, did I get this right, he's purchased a "normal" household fridge, cut the stock compresor out and is installing a Danfoss?
Interesting idea.
 Nick, any nasties you can think of in doing this?  For me there's a good chance if I do this I'd get a much better
size match for what I want in a fridge, for less money than buying a Tundra or Novakool... verrrrry interesting idea...
Gary


Boogie,

From a refrigeration standpoint, you really need to know what you are doing being a capaliary system.

The slightest bit of moisture or dirt in the system can cause major headaches for a long time. That is the reason a good refrig.

man always seals up the lines when he has to open the system like when removing the compressor. After such a

project, the system has to be evacuated, install a new dryer, and properly recharged. [and of course, sized properly]

Done right, it can be good system.

Nick-
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Nick Badame Refrig/ACC
1989, MCI 102C3, 8V92T, HT740, 06' conversion FMCA# F-27317-S "Wife- 1969 Italian/German Style"
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« Reply #23 on: February 06, 2007, 05:58:48 PM »

Nick,

What are the dimensions, they look real nice. Where did you get them?

Happy Trails,

Paul

Dreamscape

Hi Paul,

If you are referring to the paddle latch, it is made by Trimark    www.trimark.com

Nick-
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Commercial Refrigeration- Ice machines- Heating & Air/ Atlantic Custom Coach Inc.
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Jerry Liebler
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« Reply #24 on: February 06, 2007, 08:02:23 PM »

Don,
   No I didn't 'open' the sealed system.  There was enough 'slack' in the tubing to allow it to be carefully bent to the new positions.  I moved the compressor back about 3 inches and moved the coils back 1" so I maintained the same airspace in front of the coils.  BTW when the compressor is running my refrigerator is drawing between 100 and 130 watts so for those concerned about peak power draw it would be under 1 1/2 amps on 120 volts.  I also made a front mounting flange out of 3/4" hard maple and glued it to the refrigerator's sides, top and bottom, I used 'Gorilla' glue.  I made plywood legs to support it about 6" above the floor, for ventilation and to reduce the stress on the mounting flange.  Other advantages of this refrigerator, I moved it into the bus with the added insulation and mounting flange through the door and I have my microwave mounted on a shelf above it and have good air flow over the coils in the final installation.
Regards
Jerry 4107 1120
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Jerry Liebler
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« Reply #25 on: February 06, 2007, 08:17:28 PM »

To all those considering switching the compressor to a Danfos.  There is a company that does this conversion and sells 12 volt refrigerators, their units are all over $1000.  I seriously doubt that there really is any gain in efficiency over a modern energy star ccompressor, even considering the inverter losses.  The addition of insulation is a much beter and more economical route.  My experiences show that I'm in 'sunfrost' teritory with an annual energy use of about 175 kwh/yr but I only have a 6.3 cu ft refrigerator.  I do believe that if one started with the Avanti 901w and added insulation as I did,  even lower energy use could be obtained with an  8.7  cu ft refrigerator.
Regards
Jerry 4107 1120
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DavidInWilmNC
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« Reply #26 on: February 06, 2007, 08:29:05 PM »

Thanks for the info, Jerry.  Your 'super insulation' modification is what I was referring to; I just couldn't remember who posted about it.  I do want a 2 door fridge, so I'll check out the larger models you mentioned if the ones I'm considering don't look like good candidates.

David
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