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Author Topic: Microwave Convection Ovens  (Read 5115 times)
FloridaCliff
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« on: May 02, 2006, 06:59:22 AM »

We are considering going to a Convention microwave in place of the sometimes used stove top over an oven.

We still want the stove top, but what if any limitations does the convection create?

From your experiences what are the down falls, if any?

Having not owned one your opinions are appreciated.

Thanks
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« Reply #1 on: May 02, 2006, 07:38:01 AM »

I am in the same boat on this topic.  I understand this is the way to go.  However, it takes a good bit of power to cover it.  As long as the microwave does not over load the system - along with the AC and things like hair driers  - a person should be ok.

Danny
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« Reply #2 on: May 02, 2006, 07:43:48 AM »

When I had to replace my microwave I elected to install the convection oven type. I really had a time getting Miss Lazy to use it, but after a few trips we started using it and really liked it. It is amazing how good a job it does. I highly recommend it. It worked good as a microwave and as an oven.
Richard

PS We used the internal vent (no outside vent) and it worked great. We did have a fantastic vent above the range area and occasionally used it, but never ever felt the need for a separate vent for the oven.
« Last Edit: May 02, 2006, 07:57:32 AM by Driving MissLazy » Logged

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« Reply #3 on: May 02, 2006, 07:47:35 AM »

I have one in  my house and my bus.  Versatile and convenient.  The GE Advantium models  come in two flavors, 120 volt and 240 volt.  Both mine are 120.  The 240 just cooks faster, it could do baked potato in 4 or  5 minute, mine takes 15.  They have settings that you can use that employ both microwave and other heating to cook quickly.  I have baked pies in it using the normal oven setting, and it works well.  I paid about $500 each for these new, although I think they list much higher.  I suppose the only down side might be initial cost.  Its a great alternative and gives you more options when cooking.  I'm very pleased with it, and would seek it out if I was doing another remodel of any kind.  

For the most part I don't even start my generator when using it.  The microwave portion has sensor settings for beverage, soup, popcorn etc.

Also, as I menitoned in another post, I did not have to vent it outside.  I still can if I find it necessary, but it has a featuer where you add another filter, turn the vent forward, and it vents trhough a grill in front.  I may just add a regular Fantastic vent above it, good to have it anyway.
« Last Edit: May 02, 2006, 07:51:15 AM by H3Jim » Logged

Jim Stewart
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« Reply #4 on: May 02, 2006, 07:50:01 AM »

We changed to the convection/micro type several years ago and my wife loves it.  We have a gas cook top but didn't  have a gas oven so this works great for normal baking.  We don't use it with the inverter because the bake time is long but we can and do use the micro with our 3000 w Trace.  My wife loves the convection so much that after putting it in the bus she changed out gas oven in the house to convection.

Denny
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Geoff
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« Reply #5 on: May 02, 2006, 08:29:43 AM »

A small cooktop and micro/convection oven is the way to go.  The convection oven works good but it does take some adjustment on cooking times and temperature to get used to it.  It also comes with a great exhaust fan-- I plumbed mine out the floor as I just mentioned in another related post. 

--Geoff
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Geoff
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« Reply #6 on: May 02, 2006, 08:42:17 AM »

We opted to install one in our bus over using the stove top. We found that we wouldn't really use a stove top for cooking that much as we usually cook out on a grill. Isn't that what camping is anyway? Outdoor cooking! Well there are those times that an oven is needed and everything that can be done on or in one can be done in the convection oven. I'm not sure where Jim got his for 500 bucks because the one we got was from Wally World at around 150.00 and we wouldn't trade it for anything. It's quiet, quick, and efficient! It is a little larger than a microwave but the trade off is well worth it! Whatever you do, try and not install it over the fridge or up high. Spills of hot liquids can and will most likey occur and besides, having one up above your eyesight means you can't watch your food go round and round! Smiley

Ace
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DebDav
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« Reply #7 on: May 02, 2006, 09:10:08 AM »

Ace:  Jim bought Advantium ovens.  They are not convection/microwaves.  They have a microwave element but they conventionally cook using light...  When they are on they look like a bright white light inside the oven.   Claim is they cook faster than convection.  I think that is the 240VAC models.  From his post Jim states that the 120VAC model takes 3 times a long as the 240VAC.
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Nick Badame Refrig/ACC
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« Reply #8 on: May 02, 2006, 09:24:01 AM »

Floridacracker,

We also love our Convection Microwave, You just have to read the manual for the first couple of times to get used to it!

This is the DOMETIC Model, mfg. by LG

Nick-

« Last Edit: May 21, 2006, 12:52:46 PM by Nick Badame Refrig. Co. » Logged

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« Reply #9 on: May 02, 2006, 09:46:37 AM »

...  They have a microwave element but they conventionally cook using light...  When they are on they look like a bright white light inside the oven.   ...

It's not cooking.

It's just a real deep sunburn!  Cheesy

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H3Jim
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« Reply #10 on: May 02, 2006, 03:09:10 PM »


I just looked up in the manual what the GE Advantium  has, as I thought I had remembered it was a convection oven too.  Its specs are as follows:

For baking it has an 1100 watt ceramic heater from above and a 375 watt ceramic heater from below.  A convection fan ensures even heating.

For speedcooking, it has a 500 watt halogen bulb above, and also uses a 600 watt ceramic heater above, and the 375 watt heater from below. A convection fan ensures even heating.  This is how it can bake several full sized Idaho potatoes in 15 minutes.

As a straight microwave, it's  900 watt, with all the presets for various foods.

A microwave "boost" is automatically added with certain foods for faster cooking. 

For the adventurous, it can also be specifically programmed for any food, with any combination or intensity of heating modes.

For the most part, the 120 and 240 volt models take about the same amount of time to cook. Convection oven baking, and microwaving.  Its only in the specialized mode of speedcooking that the 240 volt model can run the different modes of heating at the same time rather than alternating, which does save time for some foods (such as baked potatoes).  I chose the 120 volt model since it can run it from the one 4000 watt inverter I have, and its not often I bake potatoes and can't wait another 11 minutes.  As I mentioned in the previous post, I don't normally have to start the generator to use it, especially if I am just using the microwave, and getting the 120 volt model allows for that.

I believe the Advantium is one the nicest microwave convection ovens available.

Ace, I just got a nicer, more feature rich, faster cooking oven than what you can get from wally world for $150.  Each to his own. 

Nick, wow, nice job on the kitchen.  It looks very clean and well crafted.
« Last Edit: May 02, 2006, 05:45:41 PM by H3Jim » Logged

Jim Stewart
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« Reply #11 on: May 02, 2006, 07:08:43 PM »

Hi
We have used a convection/microwave in our Beaver Marquis and Newell with great results. There are only two concerns: 1. the unit is very close to 30" long so you must have the space to install it and 2. the interior is small and requires specially made cookie sheets IF you plan to do cookies on a cookie sheet. I had a metal shop custom frabicate two cookie sheets to fit our old convect/micro as no store bought would fit. We are currently looking at a GE Advantium in stainless steel at Home Depot, the cost is $749, but I believe I can beat that with an internet search. We are planning a 3 burner Sealand Princess electric cooktop, a convect/micro and wife wants a draw dishwasher for built-in kitchen applicances in all electric coach. Wife and I both really like the convect/micro and would not do without it. Makes great baby back ribs at 200 degrees for 2 hours then put on the grill!!! Yum!!! Now that is camping!!! Smiley

Rob
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JerryH
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« Reply #12 on: May 02, 2006, 07:34:57 PM »

Hey Florida:

We own a kitchen and bath firm -- we pretty much spec and use Sharp microwaves.  Very happy with them.
Just installed an R-90GC (http://sharpusa.com/products/ModelLanding/0,1058,1129,00.html) unit which has a tilt down door.  Sharps trim kit for this unit is clunky and oversized for our recent application.  We sometimes outsource micro trim kits via Micro-Trim (http://www.microtrim.com/)

The 30" model(s) that someone posted further up are over-the-range units -- with either exhaust or recirculating vents.  This type model does limit location with it's 30" width and generally only offers about 1.0 - 1.1 CuFt. in a convection model.  The R-90GC model can be installed with a 24" trim-kit and yields about the same CuFt. interior.

A Sharp R930CS will yield a 1.5 CuFt. interior if you've got the space.

We've installed a few Advantium units (http://www.geappliances.com/products/introductions/advantium/), which our clients HAVE liked.  We've only installed the 240vac models.  We'd never install a 120vac model in a residential home.

For what it's worth ... Sharp microwave is the OEM for companies like Dacor, Kitchen-Aid, Wolf and more.  Now for a company like Wolf or Dacor to utilize and put their name on it -- one would think they're pretty happy and confident with Sharp.  FWIW.

Good luck on your quest.
Jerry H.
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BJ
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« Reply #13 on: May 03, 2006, 02:22:26 PM »

I installed the GE in my conversion, venting it to the outside. tried using it with the vent internally and wow did it get hot in the bus. Thats why it vents outside now. Using a GE stainless 2 burner cooktop special ordered from HD as my cookstove.
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H3Jim
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« Reply #14 on: May 20, 2006, 06:46:12 AM »

So far, my GE Advantium has not made either too much smell or heat in my bus.  A project I plan on doing as I get further down my priority list is to put a Fantastic vent in the ceiling in  front of the microwave, and that would take care of an excess of either smell or heat.  I need a vent anyway.
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Jim Stewart
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« Reply #15 on: May 20, 2006, 07:20:15 AM »

Cliff,

An important issue:  How are you going to use your bus?  Weekends only?  Lenghly trips?  Fulltiming?  Do you and/or your partner like to cook on the road?

If you plan on being plugged in to a post or running a generator much of the time, as mentioned above the convection oven will work fine.

We will be full timers and  plan to boondock much of the time.  We have a gen, inverter, and microwave, but for serious lengthly cooking/baking, we opted for a full range with oven.  Quiet and efficient.  Low energy use.  If you wait for certain times of the year, I got my Amana range from a Camping World sale for less than I would pay at and RV Surplus store.

Everyone has different needs and wants.  That's one of the advantages of converting a bus vs buying a commercial rig.  Put those items in it that will suit your
lifestyle.

Chuck Newman




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TomC
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« Reply #16 on: May 20, 2006, 11:31:45 PM »

I am old fashion, in that I have a three burner stove with oven beneath.  Above the vent is the Sharp microwave that is very fast!  The microwave is the same width as the stove.  On my bus I only have two propane powered appliances-the stove/oven and the furnace.  I like that when using the oven, it can be a silent affair with no generator or fan running.  As to space consumption, the convection is alot larger than the microwave.  With taking the oven out and using a cook top with the much larger convection oven, I'd bet that the size difference between the stove top and convection compared to the stove/oven with microwave would be very close.  Good Luck, TomC
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