Bus Conversions dot Com Bulletin Board
July 28, 2014, 11:59:48 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: If your computer is lost, damaged, or stolen, we will replace all of your E-Mags for free.
   Home   Help Forum Rules Search Calendar Login Register BCM Home Page Contact BCM  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Looking for supplier of inexpensive air seat Push-Pull valves  (Read 1697 times)
gumpy
Some Assembly Required
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3173


Slightly modified 1982 MC9


WWW

Ignore
« on: May 03, 2006, 04:23:13 PM »

Was thinking about building my leveling system this spring.

I was planning on using small air regulators to adjust the pressure in the bags. I bought some from Harbor Freight for about $5 each.
The problem I see is there's no easy way to mount these on the dash so they're clean, yet easy to use.

Was talking to a friend a few weeks ago and he mentioned air seat push-pull adjusting valves. I'd heard it before, but had for some reason discounted them (probably thought they'd be too pricey). He said he thought they were about $12, so I figured I'd check into them.

I found them at the local truck parts place. I think they'd work well. Standard mounting hole and crome button. Would make a nice presentation, and all I'd need is some small guages and 3-way valves.

The problem is the price. They want $20 for one. I need 3 of them and was hoping to do the system a little less expensive.
I asked them about takeouts from wrecks, as they do some used parts, but the counter man said they have a $25 minimum pull charge for used parts, so it would be more expensive to get used valves.

So, does anyone know of a more reasonably priced source for air ride seat push pull valves, or have access to a truck parts yard and be willing to pull some valves for me?





Logged

Craig Shepard
Located in Minnesquito

http://bus.gumpydog.com - "Some Assembly Required"
DrDave
Guest

« Reply #1 on: May 03, 2006, 05:01:22 PM »

Seat valves are very low volume and pressure and prone to leaking due to their design.

You may want to rethink that idea since air suspension is high pressure and high volume
the air seat valves also vent air in the valve body so all that hissing noise will be inside
with you.

If you ever take one apart there's two little O-rings on a slider bar and a vent hole
that is less than 1/32 inch diameter for the air to pass through.

Next....... Roll Eyes
Logged
Brian Diehl
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 980




Ignore
« Reply #2 on: May 03, 2006, 07:12:02 PM »

Okay, do you have any ideas on an appropriate valve, yet still common (ie. cheap)?
Logged
NJT5047
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1942





Ignore
« Reply #3 on: May 03, 2006, 08:21:19 PM »

My experience with an Ingersol Rand regulator that mounts nicely on a flat surface is that they leak down...slowly albeit, but they leak back into the air system. I use an IR reg on my front air suspension in lieu of a leveling valve and it works without issues...as long as a ball valve (or some sort of leakproof valve) isolates it when parked. About 58 lbs is where the front airbags set the correct ride height for the steering axle. This is on an 87 with single side airbags..yours may be a little different.
These regulators were not expensive...maybe $20 bucks apiece from WW Grainger. Have nice looking screw on rings that retain them on surfaces up to about a 1/4" thick. I don't use regulators on the drive axle. Just 4 ball valves that are between the airbags and leveling valves. The downside to this setup is that you cannot over-inflate the rear airbags for additional height. When one side is up to drive height, and the other side is flat, it offers considerable side-to-side leveling. Front to rear isn't so great. I always leave enough air in the front to keep the bus off the stops so no twisting is imposed.
Wondered if dropping the bus with air on the rear leveling valves may damage them? Hasn't yet. Been this way since '01. Have to let almost all air out to get the bus into the barn. Need to jack up the barn.

Best, JR
Logged

JR Lynch , Charlotte, NC
87 MC9, 6V92TA DDEC, HT748R ATEC

"Every government interference in the economy consists of giving an unearned benefit, extorted by force, to some men at the expense of others.

Ayn Rand
donnreeves
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 72





Ignore
« Reply #4 on: May 04, 2006, 04:57:42 AM »

Gumpy,
 Been there and done that.Doesn't work very well.They held air for weeks at a time,but were very slow and auckward to use.I changed to electric solinoids and it works beautifully now.I would recomend you keep the auto levelers for onroad use which will require on-off valves of some sort.I have ball valves for on-off.I don't think you can build a system for $60.
 
       Donn '80 RTS NJ
Logged
gumpy
Some Assembly Required
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3173


Slightly modified 1982 MC9


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #5 on: May 04, 2006, 05:23:41 AM »

I will be keeping the auto levelers, and using 3-way brass ball valves to isolate the air bags from the auto levelers for manual control.
I considered using electric valves for this selection, but haven't found any that don't leak back under pressure, and are inexpensive. I don't want to put several hundred $$$ into this system.

I'm also planning on using a small air pump and probably a small air tank to feed the regulators to keep everything up. I know there are some minor leaks in my suspension. Getting better, but still leak down over time (especially the fronts). I have a small pump which I currently use on the bay door air locks, which I want to use for the leveling system. I have it connected with a pressure switch. I figure a small air tank between the pump and regulator will keep it from running too much. The tank will be at 100 - 120 psi. The regulators will keep the pressure in the bags constant, at something below the pressure in the tank, so if there are leaks, it will not leak down overnight, though the pump might turn on from time to time to keep the tank filled.

So, probably, the seat valves would defeat this whole concept, anyway, since they are basically open or closed and won't maintain height automatically, like the regulators will.

Ok, so I think I'm back to the adjustable regulators idea.

craig
Logged

Craig Shepard
Located in Minnesquito

http://bus.gumpydog.com - "Some Assembly Required"
nickbeall
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 2




Ignore
« Reply #6 on: May 04, 2006, 10:28:23 AM »

Was thinking about building my leveling system this spring.

I was planning on using small air regulators to adjust the pressure in the bags. I bought some from Harbor Freight for about $5 each.
The problem I see is there's no easy way to mount these on the dash so they're clean, yet easy to use.

Was talking to a friend a few weeks ago and he mentioned air seat push-pull adjusting valves. I'd heard it before, but had for some reason discounted them (probably thought they'd be too pricey). He said he thought they were about $12, so I figured I'd check into them.

I found them at the local truck parts place. I think they'd work well. Standard mounting hole and crome button. Would make a nice presentation, and all I'd need is some small guages and 3-way valves.

The problem is the price. They want $20 for one. I need 3 of them and was hoping to do the system a little less expensive.
I asked them about takeouts from wrecks, as they do some used parts, but the counter man said they have a $25 minimum pull charge for used parts, so it would be more expensive to get used valves.

So, does anyone know of a more reasonably priced source for air ride seat push pull valves, or have access to a truck parts yard and be willing to pull some valves for me?





By the time you get through it will cost about  150.00 to 200.00 for valves ans fittings.


Nick RTS II
Logged
gumpy
Some Assembly Required
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3173


Slightly modified 1982 MC9


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #7 on: May 04, 2006, 12:02:59 PM »

Maybe.

3-way brass valves @~ $15 x 3 = $45
HF regulators @~ $6 x 3 = $18
Tubing x ~120ft (can't remember what how much it was pre foot)

That's roughly $70.

Add in some brass fittings to bypass the auto levelers @ ~$2 x ~16-20 = $32 (probably excessive as I'll be using plastic DOT air line and fittings are pretty cheap)

Add on a small air tank of some sort (maybe an empty freon tank or small propane tank with old style valve replaced).

I think I can do it for under $100.

Maybe. Maybe not.
Logged

Craig Shepard
Located in Minnesquito

http://bus.gumpydog.com - "Some Assembly Required"
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.18 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!