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Author Topic: What is the BTU rating of the A/C coil on MC7?  (Read 2380 times)
oldmansax
Tom & Phyllis
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'82 Bluebird Wanderlodge PT40




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« Reply #15 on: April 28, 2007, 06:43:43 AM »

I will get out the book on my gen and check my options when I have a minute. Things piled up on me while we were down in SC & I am trying to catch up. Maybe next week.......
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pvcces
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« Reply #16 on: April 29, 2007, 09:14:24 PM »

Buswarrior, I think that the overloaded winding will run hot. You may not be able to tell it from the outside of the generator, but I think the windings are not heavy enough to carry the full load on one leg unless they are rated for it. The cost alone would prohibit that.

For what it's worth.

Tom Caffrey
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Tom Caffrey PD4106-2576
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JackConrad
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« Reply #17 on: April 30, 2007, 05:08:56 AM »

Tom,
   I think Buswarrior was referring to combining both sets of windings into one 120 volt ouput so that both sets of windings are producing an equal amount of power.  Jack
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« Reply #18 on: April 30, 2007, 02:47:06 PM »

To clarify, somewhat...

My observations in the past with a 120/240 generator rated for 8000 watts, (whatever the manufacturer meant by that rating...)

with a pair of roof airs as the load, the voltage was pulled down to 100v when running on one leg.

The voltage ran much closer to the 120v with each roof air re-assigned to its own pole of the 240/120.

As I was only focused on the situation of the day (make inverter happy, not happy at 100v) and not the grander theatre of the academic possibilities, I did no further testing, and it pre-dated my infra red thermometer.

Since heat is the enemy for long term health of electric stuff like generator heads, I was wondering if, for a given load, whether there might be some slightly cooler running opportunites for wiring straight 120 instead of the imbalance of a 120/240 set-up?

All the windings sharing instead of only half of them working?

happy coaching!
buswarrior
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« Reply #19 on: April 30, 2007, 10:51:08 PM »

Buswarrior, I agree that it would be best to get the windings to share the loads equally. I though that you were asking if one winding would run hot if you ran the unit heavily loaded on just one of the windings.

For what it's worth.

Tom Caffrey
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Tom Caffrey PD4106-2576
Suncatcher
Ketchikan, Alaska
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