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Author Topic: Louvers for Engine Compartment  (Read 3549 times)
John Z
1959 GM PD-4104 4139 Northern Minnesota
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« Reply #30 on: May 29, 2007, 06:11:34 AM »

Re: the belting on GM's? Where was this attached to bus? Is it full width on the original install? Was it in contact with the bus or is a space left up there? And finally, how tall should it be, or how close to the ground when aired up?
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Custom patches, caps, t-shirts, lapel pins etc since 1994.
Silver Brook Custom Embroidery and Patches
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"Now I Know Why Turtles Look So Smug"
Dallas
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« Reply #31 on: May 29, 2007, 07:03:21 AM »

Re: the belting on GM's? Where was this attached to bus? Is it full width on the original install? Was it in contact with the bus or is a space left up there? And finally, how tall should it be, or how close to the ground when aired up?

John,

Look up under the back end of your '04, just behind the wheel wells. You should see a piece of angle iron about 1"X1".

The flap hangs there. It is pretty much just a mud flap that runs the whole width of the bus.
On my 3610, it was about 4" off the ground and on my 4103 I'm going to make it even closer. Probably 2" or so. My theory being that the less air that can be pushed under the bus to the engine compartment, the more air that will be drawn through the radiator and moved over the engine for cooling.
I just looked in the master parts manual for the 4104 but didn't see it, probably because I'm not certain what GM called it.

I hope this helped,

Dallas

GO Bussing!
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John Z
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« Reply #32 on: May 29, 2007, 10:15:06 AM »

Thanks Dallas,

I aired up the bus and looked under there, but am unable to spot where it would have been mounted. but i see some mounts that look like perhaps there was a belly pan of some sorts under the motor. Is this possible?
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Custom patches, caps, t-shirts, lapel pins etc since 1994.
Silver Brook Custom Embroidery and Patches
www.silverbrook-mn.com
 
"Now I Know Why Turtles Look So Smug"
Dallas
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« Reply #33 on: May 29, 2007, 10:32:51 AM »

Thanks Dallas,

I aired up the bus and looked under there, but am unable to spot where it would have been mounted. but i see some mounts that look like perhaps there was a belly pan of some sorts under the motor. Is this possible?

your looking to far back toward the engine. The flap hangs closer to the rear tires, and yes, All the GMC's came with a belly pan to catch the horse power as it leaked out.

I can get the part numbers for you if you want them, but I have never seen a bus with the shield still installed. I think all the mechanics tossed them as soon as they could because they made it such a pain in the keister to do anything under the engine, especially change oil and oil filter.
If you happen to find a set of the shields, you will have a super rare item that lots of other people would love to talk you out of. Make 'em pay for it!  Wink

Dallas

GO BUSSING!
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Tom Y
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« Reply #34 on: May 29, 2007, 02:06:20 PM »

I looked at a Beaver motor home today with a Cat C12. It had a side radiator and louvers on the rear door. But it also had a electric fan on the back, looked like a car rad fan. Just another idea. Tom Y
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