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Author Topic: Do I want an all electric coach???  (Read 5038 times)
Chaz
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« Reply #30 on: May 22, 2007, 10:57:40 AM »

I can see how even one can be helpful. But I would have to find a "sceamin deal" to purchase them. I have other priorities I NEED to get first. But a good deal is a good deal!!  Grin

  Chaz
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Green-Hornet
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« Reply #31 on: May 22, 2007, 10:58:03 AM »

If I ever get one i would do the inside all electric. I would like to put an outdoor kitchen in a lower bay. That would be propane.
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gg04
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« Reply #32 on: May 22, 2007, 11:01:07 AM »

Not Sure that solar has improved that much in the last 5 years  have watched dozens of people try covering the whole tops and sides of buses with never any ability to pay back cost.,, just another toy...
check fmca and any of the rv sites tons of articles by lots of people that have tryed...not like solar house...check how many sq.ft. of panel for usable,i.e. power appliances through inverter.. just not enough room on top of bus...and unable to aim and control tracking... never get payback for money involved and never enough power except to top off charged batteries do a  little research....gg04
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If you personally have not done it  , or saw it done.. do not say it cannot be done...1960 4104 6L71ta ddec Falfurrias Tx
prevost82
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« Reply #33 on: May 22, 2007, 11:10:50 AM »

the way I look at it ... you can buy alot of diesel for what you get out of solar
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H3Jim
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« Reply #34 on: May 22, 2007, 11:41:17 AM »

Solar is quiet and prepaid, after the initial pain, its like free power.  I think for me the allure is that its totally quiet, and always there. (at least during the day).

You can save a lot of diesel by going solar.

You can use the solar if you are parked in a place when and where you can't start your generator.  Last month  I was at the Silver Strand, on the ocean in San Diego.  They don't let you start your generator before 10am.  I like to eat breakfast before then, but I was not concerned about the stove top, microwave, toaster, stereo etc using power because I was already making more than I was using.  I never did need to start the generator.

If I was only worried about cost, I would not own a bus.
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Jim Stewart
El Cajon, Ca.  (San Diego area)

Travel is more than the seeing of sights, it is a change that goes on, deep  and permanent, in the ideas of living.
skipn
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« Reply #35 on: May 22, 2007, 11:42:04 AM »

Chaz
 A couple minor details to include as you are penciling in the numbers.

 On my inverter (Xantrex) the pass through AC has a max load of 30 amps. With the generator going powering 2 Air conditioners, guitar, pa amps, fridge, etc I popped the breaker on the pass through. Took me a day to figure out what happened. So check your pass through amps in the user man.

 On 30 amp shore (or possible gen depending) remember that when the inverter goes to charge the batteries there is an additional amp drain and can kick out the master breaker. If you are running 50 amp master probably not as much problem but then you still have the inverter pass through.
 
 As others have said it is a balancing act.

Skip
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luvrbus
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« Reply #36 on: May 22, 2007, 05:31:32 PM »

Chaz we have had a total electric for over 10 years and i am trying to get away from the total electric because of our use we go to the mountains of Idaho in the summer and i have to run my generator a lot to keep up with the use i am going to look at a Amish built fridge that someone posted about i am replacing the cooktop with a 3 burner gaggenau my electric cooktop is 220 v and so i have 2 sw 2512 inverters stacked but when you cook, heat water,watch tv and a few other things the batteries are gone and i am tired of buying new batteries every 3 years and now the 255amp agm batteries are over 500.00 bucks each and i have 3 if a total electric fit your needs do it i just want to be able to use my bus without running the generators so much but i will keep my hot water heater because i don't want to cut a hole in the side i am sad about cutting a hole for the fridge in the roof also propane is cheaper than diesel
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Jerry Liebler
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« Reply #37 on: May 22, 2007, 06:18:26 PM »

Skipn,
    Chaz has an SW4024 which has a 60 amp pass through specification.  I have an SW2512 which also has a 60 amp pass through spec.  With the 60 amp pass through spec a 120 volt only buss can use the full 50 amps of a shore cord and 60 amps from a 7500 watt genset.
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Jerry 4107 1120
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Jerry Liebler
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« Reply #38 on: May 22, 2007, 06:27:30 PM »

luvrbus,
    It seems that switching to a propane cooktop would off load enough battery drain that with use of the generator autostart built into your inverters your battery life should be more like 10 years.  I would look hard at a modern energy star refrigerator with added insulation to avoid the hole in the roof required by a propane refer.  I have a 6.5 cu ft. refrigerator that averages under 19 watts.
Regards
Jerry 4107 1120
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H3Jim
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« Reply #39 on: May 22, 2007, 07:04:44 PM »

and I think an induction cooktop would be more efficient than the one you are using now.  I just bought a small one that's a little bigger than a  hotplate to try it out. I like it a lot.  holds heat to withing several degrees of where you set it, instant on or off heat like gas, much less wasted heat - more efficient and less heat going into the bus on a hot day.

Two downsides are

1. cost of the built in ones ( the 12" hot late one was $165 with a pan from Amazon)
2. Must use a  pan that reacts to magnetism so aluminum pans don't work.

Others on this board have talked about them. The tradeoffs are worth it to me.

My system is all electric and I am happy with it. The differences are I have more battery capacity so I don't ever run them down more than 50%.  I expect to get 7 or more years from mine. My refrigerator is more efficient.  I suspect my other appliances are more efficient too.  I have a hot water system that uses diesel to heat with. and I have solar to augment and which always tops the batteries off every day. I don't believe you can get a full charge on your batteries from a generator.  The 2nd and 3rd stage of charging is always cut back when you use a generator to charge with.

And regarding the pass through on the inverter, with a 12k generator, remember you have another leg of 50 amp capacity that you can use, that does not pass through the inverter, but does require the generator to be running in order to access that power.

I have another bus nut friend that is all electric, and he is using 8  8D AGM's not three.  Pricey to start with but his batteries last a long time.  he has been full timing over 4 years, and they show no sign of being weakened.  He expects to get close to 10 years from his.
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Jim Stewart
El Cajon, Ca.  (San Diego area)

Travel is more than the seeing of sights, it is a change that goes on, deep  and permanent, in the ideas of living.
luvrbus
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« Reply #40 on: May 22, 2007, 08:06:44 PM »

If i had a 24v system i would go with the sun frost fridge but mine is 12v so i am going another way i just got a email back for 8d glass mats and they where over 600.00 each that would be 4800.00 plus shipping plus all the space and extra weight and i can make hot through the heating system i will see you at bus'n usa if you make it this year and look at your system if you don't mine
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niles500
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« Reply #41 on: May 22, 2007, 09:01:30 PM »

luvr - I can save you about $150 each right here - not toooo long ago I believe I saw them for about $370 - do some shopping - HTH


http://www.12-volts-batteries.com/Lifeline-Links.html
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H3Jim
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« Reply #42 on: May 22, 2007, 10:00:46 PM »

The sunfrost refrigerator will run on either 12 volt or 24 volt.  While they do sell both models, (a 12 volt and a 24 volt) the only difference is the light bulb inside. The compressors automatically tell which voltage they are getting and adjust accordingly.

I've paid my $ for Bus'N USA this year.  Be there friday.
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Jim Stewart
El Cajon, Ca.  (San Diego area)

Travel is more than the seeing of sights, it is a change that goes on, deep  and permanent, in the ideas of living.
gr8njt
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« Reply #43 on: May 23, 2007, 03:53:13 AM »

I have a hot water system that uses diesel to heat with and I have solar to augment and which always tops the batteries off every day. I don't believe you can get a full charge on your batteries from a generator.  The 2nd and 3rd stage of charging is always cut back when you use a generator to charge with.

And regarding the pass through on the inverter, with a 12k generator, remember you have another leg of 50 amp capacity that you can use, that does not pass through the inverter, but does require the generator to be running in order to access that power.

The above are all painfully true. The generator can never adequately equalize a battery bank and can not desulfate either. Solar power can efficiently do both "fuel & grid free".

This will be the next phase of my "All Electric Coach"
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****1982 MCI-9 Crusader-II Bus Conversion****
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kyle4501
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« Reply #44 on: May 23, 2007, 05:12:45 AM »

The main thing is to minimize the power you require/ use. You do this by lifestyle changes. Simply buying the most efficient appliances you can find is not necessarily the answer.

When boondocking, you have to carry the power you will use & that takes space.

Some solar is a great thing for the trickle charging of batteries.

But planning your actions can have a much bigger impact.
Your menu should take into account where you are - power pole or boondocking.
Full showers (as opposed to sponge bath) while boondocking takes a toll on resources too.
Insulation & shade will also minimize need for A/C.

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