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Author Topic: carrying a golf cart  (Read 2378 times)
cody
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« on: May 23, 2007, 11:11:21 AM »

I have a chance to buy a small golf cart from a relative, after measuring it, with a few minor modifications it would stow in the front bay of the bus, anyone seen this done before?  The bay is built plenty strong to hold it and the weight wouldn't put me anywhere near over the limits, any thoughts on this hairbrained idea? lol
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Chaz
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« Reply #1 on: May 23, 2007, 11:15:31 AM »

I think it's a cool idea. Especially if you use your coach where you can also use a golf cart!! My Harley will fit in my basement and I intend to create a ramp/tie down assembly to be able to take it with me.

  Go for it!
       Chaz
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cody
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« Reply #2 on: May 23, 2007, 11:23:36 AM »

I know many parks won't allow them but I did check with one park that prohibits golf carts and they told me that as long as I have a handicapper sticker they have no problem with them being used and a few people do use them, not sure about other parks but it's an idea that I'm looking at.
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cody
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« Reply #3 on: May 23, 2007, 11:26:49 AM »

The modifications to the cart would be fairly simple, hinging the windshield to flip down, the same with the seat back, the hardest would be to cut the steering wheel column and put in a pin so it could come apart. 
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« Reply #4 on: May 23, 2007, 12:12:37 PM »

Homegrowndiesel has one that he designed a clever steering column tilt fearure. Maybe Bill will chime in & elaborate.
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« Reply #5 on: May 23, 2007, 12:39:40 PM »

Homegrowndiesel has one that he designed a clever steering column tilt fearure. Maybe Bill will chime in & elaborate.

Hay Kyle,
Bill has a small universal joint that he fabricated and fitted to the lower part of the steer collum. Then he has a simple pipe thats a bit larger that slides over the joint to support the collum. Just lift the pipe sleeve to collapse the collum.
Simple and very effective.... You don't need precisce engineering on a golf cart!
Nick-
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« Reply #6 on: May 23, 2007, 01:02:30 PM »

I have one in California at my son's that I always planned on converting to get it into a bay, but never got a round Tuit.

It is a pretty neat machine. Three wheeled with a two cycle Harley Davidson engine and it is licensed for street use so it should be legal anywhere, even in a campground.

Unusual is that for reverse you stop the engine, throw a switch that makes the starter crank the engine backwards and it starts then and runs backward. Therefore you have reverse. It is a belt drive with torque converter so no gear shifting is required. As I recall it would go about 30 mph.
Richard
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« Reply #7 on: May 23, 2007, 01:11:30 PM »

I have one in California at my son's that I always planned on converting to get it into a bay, but never got a round Tuit.

It is a pretty neat machine. Three wheeled with a two cycle Harley Davidson engine and it is licensed for street use so it should be legal anywhere, even in a campground.

Unusual is that for reverse you stop the engine, throw a switch that makes the starter crank the engine backwards and it starts then and runs backward. Therefore you have reverse. It is a belt drive with torque converter so no gear shifting is required. As I recall it would go about 30 mph.
Richard

That's interesting.  Mercury outboards used to operate like that.
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« Reply #8 on: May 23, 2007, 01:16:45 PM »

I do not remember date of manufacture but I am guessing at least in the 60's. I have had it since the 70's and it was kinda old when I got it.
Richard


I have one in California at my son's that I always planned on converting to get it into a bay, but never got a round Tuit.

It is a pretty neat machine. Three wheeled with a two cycle Harley Davidson engine and it is licensed for street use so it should be legal anywhere, even in a campground.

Unusual is that for reverse you stop the engine, throw a switch that makes the starter crank the engine backwards and it starts then and runs backward. Therefore you have reverse. It is a belt drive with torque converter so no gear shifting is required. As I recall it would go about 30 mph.
Richard

That's interesting.  Mercury outboards used to operate like that.
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cody
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« Reply #9 on: May 23, 2007, 01:57:38 PM »

That brings up another question, I'll have to find out what I need as far as permits, stickers or license to operate it.  I guess I never thought I'd have to have it licensed to operate it.
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« Reply #10 on: May 23, 2007, 02:06:43 PM »

We carry a golf cart on a small flatbed trailer to bluegrass festivals and antique tractor shows.  We have no permits, licenses, etc. on the golf cart.  However, we do not drive it on any public streets as it is not street legal (no turn signals, brake lights, wipers, etc.)  We have found different requirements, but most places require all operators to have a drivers license. I think this is to prevent children from operating the carts. Jack
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« Reply #11 on: May 23, 2007, 02:19:23 PM »

I decided to keep my golf cart. It will fit in my front bay after I lower the steering wheel about 1 inch, flip the windshield down, and lower the top! I will probably make the top where it will raise and lower on it's post! Once I lower the wheel, the windshield folded down and the top can then be lowered. Sort of like a smashed cart but it WILL fit. To get it in and out, I will fabricate aluminum ramps that will store in the same bay. Once out, raise the top, flip the shield, and lock up the wheel!

Hey for 1100 dollars I can cut it to shreds and still be money ahead for the use I have had from it already! Grin

Ace
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Ace Rossi
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« Reply #12 on: May 23, 2007, 05:28:03 PM »

Cody, not hair brained at all, but a relly good idea. handy to have transportation while you're there.

Ace, sounds cool, great buy, and bet it works great.  You haev one bay thats a few inches wider than mine.  Mine are all 44" wide, I believe you have one that's 50".
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« Reply #13 on: May 23, 2007, 06:39:12 PM »

Regarding "Direct Reversing" Merc outboards and golf carts...most gas powered golf carts still work similarly.  I sell Yamaha products and their golf cart engine stops whenever you take your foot off the accel.  If you want to move very slowly, the starter motor moves the cart.  Step on the gas and away you go.  Move the reverse lever up and the engine starts and runs backwards.  These are high-tech 4 stroke engines.
Merc did the same thing with a double field starter that had two bendix gears on the starter.  When shifting to reverse, the distributor wound around so the timing would match reverse rotation.  It worked fine. When the Merc 800 full gearshift came out, the DRs were history.
FWIW, Homegrowndie has a "vintage" Yamaha gasoline powered golf cart.  It has a really low profile...even without the steering mod.
Most campgrounds won't allow gasoline powered golf carts unless you have a 'capper placard hanging on it.  Most will allow electric carts.
Most campgrounds also require liability insurance if you use it in the campground...electric or otherwise.  This is typically a rider available from your homeowners agent.  Not at all expensive.
I saw a tiny little golf cart in Denton, NC that would fit into an MCI bay
(MCIs have the curse of the center tunnel).  I've never seen anything quite like it...about 4' long and maybe 2.5' wide.  Two medium sized people were riding it.  Something to turn over if one became careless!
I'm thinking about a Yamaha Rhino for the big campgrounds that we visit...almost all bluegrass festivals. Fewer rules at these things.
Hoping the '08 Rhino gets power steering and fuel injection...similar to the '07 Grizzly 700.   I can install some turn signals and hang a dealer tag on the thing and call it an automobile...sorta.   These things are the ultimate "golf cart"...
Golf carts are a "fashion statement" in some areas.  We often see lifted, big tractor tired, alloy wheels, neon, led, sound system, custom painted golf carts (usually NASCAR motif).  Very cool item for usn's rednecks!  Wink
Alas, I prattle!  JR
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cody
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« Reply #14 on: May 23, 2007, 07:20:21 PM »

The one I can get is a yamaha, not too old maybe 8 years old but it has a fairly low profile, I like how the seat attaches, it'll be easy to modify the seat back bracket and the windshield will be easy to hinge.  How do they hold up over time?  He said it'll go almost forever on a tank of gas.
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