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Author Topic: I hate fiberglass!  (Read 3520 times)
belfert
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« on: May 10, 2006, 05:31:47 AM »

I'm really starting to hate fiberglass!  The folks at Dina used fiberglass to build the entire bathroom interior.  The top half came out in one piece with minimal cutting, but I've been cutting on the bottom half for a total of five hours now. 

I used a grinder with metal cutting wheel one evening, but that created dust everywhere.  Yes, I did wear a dust mask and safety glasses.  The second evening I used a cordless sawzall and that created much less dust, but I kept using up batteries faster than they would charge.

I still have a small part of the fiberglass to remove this evening, but luckily my friend is coming over.

Brian Elfert
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TomC
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« Reply #1 on: May 10, 2006, 08:30:54 AM »

Oh the advantages of the good old corded hand tools.  I used all corded, just used a power strip for multiple uses.  Good Luck, TomC
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Tom & Donna Christman. '77 AMGeneral 10240B; 8V-71TATAIC V730.
belfert
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« Reply #2 on: May 10, 2006, 08:47:31 AM »

I got the cordless sawzall as a free mail in offer with my Makita cordless set or I probably wouldn't have a sawzall at all.  I tried to see if anyone I knew had a corded one, but no luck.

I have two cordless drills I am using for the removing screws and drilling out rivits.  I can't imagine doing this with my corded drill.  The batteries last plenty long in the drills.

Brian Elfert
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Clarke Echols
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« Reply #3 on: May 10, 2006, 08:55:01 AM »

I have a Milwaukee Sawzall ("Sawzall" is a Milwaukee trademark.  the correct term is "reciprocating saw") and it is a real time saver in doing  demolition as well as cutting in difficult places (such as cutting a protruding nail off behind the baseboard radiator in the residential bathroom I'm updating in the house I built 30 years ago).  I NEVER use battery-powered tools.  That way I never need the tool and it has a dead battery.  I also find that generally you get better performance as well.  Batteries are a pain, though they can be handy when you're a long way from a power source...

Clarke

I'm really starting to hate fiberglass!  The folks at Dina used fiberglass to build the entire bathroom interior.  The top half came out in one piece with minimal cutting, but I've been cutting on the bottom half for a total of five hours now. 

I used a grinder with metal cutting wheel one evening, but that created dust everywhere.  Yes, I did wear a dust mask and safety glasses.  The second evening I used a cordless sawzall and that created much less dust, but I kept using up batteries faster than they would charge.

I still have a small part of the fiberglass to remove this evening, but luckily my friend is coming over.

Brian Elfert
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Clarke Echols
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« Reply #4 on: May 10, 2006, 08:58:23 AM »

Dang it...

I forgot to say what I wanted to say in the first place -- I buy a lot of my tools at pawn shops.  That's where I bought my Sawzall, my Porter-Cable industrial saber saw (some call it a "jig" saw, but jig saws look more like today's scroll saws.
Prices are negotiable, and if you establish a relationship with a few shops, you can do rather well.

At least doing two posts will get me a bit closer to getting rid of that "newbie" designation. :-)

I'm really starting to hate fiberglass!  The folks at Dina used fiberglass to build the entire bathroom interior.  The top half came out in one piece with minimal cutting, but I've been cutting on the bottom half for a total of five hours now. 

I used a grinder with metal cutting wheel one evening, but that created dust everywhere.  Yes, I did wear a dust mask and safety glasses.  The second evening I used a cordless sawzall and that created much less dust, but I kept using up batteries faster than they would charge.

I still have a small part of the fiberglass to remove this evening, but luckily my friend is coming over.

Brian Elfert
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belfert
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« Reply #5 on: May 10, 2006, 09:08:16 AM »

I have a Milwaukee Sawzall ("Sawzall" is a Milwaukee trademark.  the correct term is "reciprocating saw") and it is a real time saver in doing  demolition as well as cutting in difficult places (such as cutting a protruding nail off behind the baseboard radiator in the residential bathroom I'm

I use the word Sawzall instead of the proper reciprocating saw because most folks have no idea what a reciprocating saw is, but they have heard of a sawzall.  I doubt I'll be getting a letter from Milwaukee's lawyers any time soon.

I've been in pawn shops a few times, but the prices are usually almost as much as a new tool.  The prices may be negotiable, but I like to deal with shops that at least start with a reasonable price.

Brian Elfert
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boogiethecat
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« Reply #6 on: May 10, 2006, 12:39:09 PM »

...and if I have a fairly "one use" application for an expensive tool, i always take the time to find a deal on ebay.  I buy the tool, use it, and then resell it.

Case in point, I bought a Makita power planer to plane the goo off the backside of a bunch of beautiful oak flooring that I was given for my bus, that had been unsucessfully glued by a homeowner for installation, later removed and discarded, and new oak properly nailed back in.

I got the planer for $240, used it for two weeks and pretty much beat it up cleaning off all my flooring, and when finished, cleaned up the machine and resold it on ebay for $270.  Basically I use ebay as a "free tool rental" and it works extrememly well. Total cost: $5 or so for the freight, after the profits from the sale paid for even most of that!!

Two possible problems:
(1) you can't be in a hurry
(2) you fall in love with the tool and keep it.  Even though, it's still a great deal if you buy properly
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1962 Crown
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« Reply #7 on: May 10, 2006, 02:47:04 PM »

From fiberglass, to pawn shopping, to cordless tools, to corded tools, to who knows what? Gosh it doesn't take much for a thread to wander off course!  Huh
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FloridaCliff
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« Reply #8 on: May 10, 2006, 02:48:37 PM »

Its not wandering, its evolving!!!! Grin
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« Reply #9 on: May 10, 2006, 06:29:31 PM »

You'll want to use cheap power tools on fiberglass.  Fiberglass dust just kills brush motors.  Kill saw blades and any other cutting edge too.  
Having spent too many years in the marine business, I also hate fiberglass.  Angry
Anyone with respiratory problems or allegies would be smart to avoid fiberglass dust totally. 
Good luck with the remainder of your fiberglass removal project.
BTW, have you checked Ebay for cheapo sawzall?  Ebay's way better than pawn shops. 
Cheers, JR
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JR Lynch , Charlotte, NC
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« Reply #10 on: May 10, 2006, 06:44:29 PM »

Really , a angle grinder with the most coarse sand paper will be the fastest
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« Reply #11 on: May 10, 2006, 07:56:34 PM »

Actually an angle grinder with a diamond tile blade works best of all. Still get some dust, but it cuts like butter and never wears out.


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Craig Shepard
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belfert
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« Reply #12 on: May 10, 2006, 08:03:36 PM »

Really , a angle grinder with the most coarse sand paper will be the fastest

I have been using an angle grinder with a cutting wheel, but it creates a ton of dust.  The reciprocating saw creates far less dust, but takes a little longer.  I'm almost done with the fiberglass in the bathroom at least.

Brian Elfert
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belfert
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« Reply #13 on: May 10, 2006, 08:07:59 PM »

Actually an angle grinder with a diamond tile blade works best of all. Still get some dust, but it cuts like butter and never wears out.

I actually had one of those on the grinder before I started and switched over to a metal cutting disk.  I wasn't sure that I wanted to use the diamond blade on fiberglass.  If I need the grinder again I will switch back to the diamond blade.  Thanks.

Brian Elfert
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kyle4501
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« Reply #14 on: May 11, 2006, 03:26:09 PM »

A cordless grinder & a tiny amount of water continously applied to the diamond cutter should eliminate the dust (the cordless part should minimize shocking developments). Of course, you will need to manage the water spray like they do on wet saws.

When I researched cordless tools, I found that the reciprocating saw used so much energy that it could damage the battery.

Clarke, I understand your thoughts on cordless tools & if you don't want to change your mind, DO NOT use a 18v cordless impact driver (for running screws). So far, everyone that has used mine has bought one for themselves. It replaced my air nailers as the most fun tool I own. (BTW, the port-a-band & mig welder are always in the top 5.)

kyle4501
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