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Author Topic: Wood for interior  (Read 4537 times)
musicman
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« on: June 19, 2007, 03:14:47 PM »

Well guys It looks like cedar is out..What would you guys suggest and where can I find pics of coach interiors that have been custom done..I want that rough wood look but havent really seen anything to write home about...I dont like Mahogany or
Oak..I want that rustic look without it looking like a wonder moose lodge or what ever they call it...What about Knotty pine or air dried Cypress?...I would appreciate some ideas and help...I ordered 3.. 4x8 sheets of copper today..I dont even want to talk about that... Shocked Shocked Shocked Shocked..Lets just say they sure are proud of that stuff
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Slow Rider
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« Reply #1 on: June 19, 2007, 03:23:39 PM »

I have no clue on the wood working, Cody is the man for that answer.  But, I can't wait to see the pics of the shower when you finish. I expect the copper will  look awesome.

Frank
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« Reply #2 on: June 19, 2007, 03:32:21 PM »

I have an old slabsided jenny lynn  barn about 150 years old that I need to tear down. That would give you a genuine rustic look and I could almost guarantee you that there would not be another one around like it. LOL
BTW, you mentioned something about weight and i really do not think any kind of interior you use would create a weight problem. My Eagle was finished in solid myrtle wood and only weighed about 40,000 pounds when completed. Mytle wood is one of the heaviest woods in the world and a fresh cut log will not float.
Richard
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« Reply #3 on: June 19, 2007, 03:39:32 PM »

If you want duability you should use a hardwood. I know you don't like oak or mahogany, but they would be your better choices. Also most readily available at most box stores and local lumberyards. Redwood in nice, but it is a soft wood also, along with pine and fir. Also, the woods I have listed are easier to work with. If you want something differant try black walnut. It's just a very dark wood, very hard but pretty. Just finish it with linseed oil. I worked in a lumber yard when I was young, and those were the choices then, and now from what I have seen. Too mcuh dark wood and the coach will look small. Just my two cents.

Cody will give you more suggestions I am sure.

Happy Trails,

Paul

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buddydawg
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« Reply #4 on: June 19, 2007, 03:51:32 PM »

You could use hickory.  If you get hickory with heart and sapwood it can have a wide range of coloration on each board, it will look rustic and it is very hard and durable.  You will have to purchase it from a specialty lumber company.  Also not many folks use it, so you can be different.  I just finish trimmed a house that had hickory floors and they were good looking. 
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« Reply #5 on: June 19, 2007, 04:02:19 PM »

Musicman,

You can use anykind of wood you want.

Just use it as a veneer over a good stable cabinet grade plywood, preferably poplar since it's a very stable and easy to work with wood.

The problem with using a solid wood is that it will swell and shrink with humidity which could cause drawers to stick, cracks to form, and screws to loosen.

Yes, I know, many people use solid wood, and some of it is a very good choice, but there IS a whole different skill set needed when building with hard wood.

However you do it, have fun and keep lots of bandaids on hand.

Dallas

I see Buddydawg posted while I was writing this and mentioned Hickory. If you choose to go that route, I know a fellow in NE South Carolina that has a big pile of Hickory slabs, all rough cut and ready to surface.

Another thought, use some of the flitches that are left from the veneer making process. Usually those sell very cheap or are given away free.

DF
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cody
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« Reply #6 on: June 19, 2007, 04:06:26 PM »

The selection of wood is almost endless, depending on how deep the pockets are, one of the woods I like and hate to work with is birdseye maple, it is difficult to work with because of the eyes but finishes out nicely with a very unusual patterning to it.  Hickory has been mentioned and if you get heartwood it's not only easy to work with, it looks great.  I did a set of cabinets for a home out of rosewood, turned out great but has a slightly dark red tint to it, cherry also makes a great cabinet, especially if its quartersawn, gives some depth to the grain. another great wood to work with and finishes nicely is Koa, many of the exotics give a great end result but are costly, the nice thing about them is the amount needed to dress out a bus is not going to break the bank and will give you the bus that nobody else has.  As a thought, concider a knotty pine ceiling made out of 3/8inch thick wainscotting (bends easily around the contours) with birdseye maple cabinetry, very light colored interior depending on the stain used but distinctive and different, you will need color that can be added by the furniture and floor coverings, just some thoughts on it.
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Gary '79 5C
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« Reply #7 on: June 19, 2007, 04:07:25 PM »

Hardwood is the way to go to me. BUT also remember to rout every edge and every outside corner. My head is alot softer than the Missouri hardwood my interior is may of. Thank goodness that Sam Caylor put a 1/2 " radius on all edges.

Gary
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« Reply #8 on: June 19, 2007, 04:08:14 PM »

Have you looked at MAC's Moose cabins?
http://www.motorcabin.com/

Might give you some ideas.

Len
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« Reply #9 on: June 19, 2007, 04:20:59 PM »

I am going to do my next bus in cypress.  We built a church in Noxapater and finished the interior in sheetrock and cypress.  Most beautiful church I've ever seen. 

One of our members had plenty of cypress on his property and he milled it and dried it for us.  IT WAS BEAUTIFUL!
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musicman
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« Reply #10 on: June 19, 2007, 04:27:55 PM »

Dont get me started about the Barm wood I will be there tearing it down since it was my first choice and it has that aged grey weathered look..I also have a plainer than can handle 16 inch boards and My sander can as well..I just dont want the average everyday run of the mill coach...This will be my last coach to build and I want it to stand out..Ive seen interiors built out of swamp cypress and barn wood and it almost takes your breath away, because they are so nice..But not in a coach So I wanna be the first...I have my shop Smith 5 So I can build anything..I just want it to be durable..Thanks guys for the ideas, Guess I still have alot to thunk about
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« Reply #11 on: June 19, 2007, 04:29:42 PM »

I used Birch covered furniture grade 3/4" plywood straight from Home Depot.  Looks almost like Oak, but not quite.  3/4" allowed me to do all my walls without studs-hence squeezing a few more inches out of the floor plan.  This plywood is really great to work with, doesn't have gapping holes in the middle plys, and verithanes up really nice with a beautiful grain pattern to it.  
My cabinets are framed in true 3/4" x 2" white oak though.  Good Luck, TomC
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« Reply #12 on: June 19, 2007, 05:21:02 PM »

I live about 40 miles from the local Mills Pride cabinet factory and have access to their out of dimension lumber.

I bought 631 bd ft of rough cut white oak from them for $30.00.
They sell it by the pallet load  and most of the loads are 700 to 750 bd ft.

I've already done the closet above the engine and it looks great. I really like the looks of white oak.

It turned out so well I may do the kitchen cabinets also.
(I'm kinda new to woodworking)

Ed
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musicman
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« Reply #13 on: June 19, 2007, 07:01:08 PM »

I just talked to a guy who made his cabinets for his house out of hand rubbed Maple with European hinges and they were beautiful and shiny..He also said he had built 2 many uppers and had them in the barn and I could have them..They aint shiny or pretty just raw maple cabinets, So Since he gave me about half of the cabinets I need for free I guess Im going to build the lowers out of Maple..They arent stained just raw maple cabinets..I might use a medium stain with the poly in it and hand sand them in between coats..Im like a kid at Christmas...Can I open my presents yet,,HUH can I please..Since this is my last year with my current employer Im going to be able to devote 24/7/365 to this coach..I dont drink but I might start
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cody
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« Reply #14 on: June 19, 2007, 07:06:28 PM »

If he put a hand rubbed finish on them he probably put whats called a "french polish", that very difficult to do but will last forever, it's hand rubbed linseed oil.  They used to use it for custom gunstocks and the finer grades of furniture. The steps are time consuming and labor intensive but if you have the time to devote to it the end result is unlike any other finish.
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musicman
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« Reply #15 on: June 19, 2007, 07:22:14 PM »

Well its hand rubbed and he said it took the entire family weeks to work on them when they had the time,But dang they look like a million bucks..My cuttent employer has a Prevost and Ive noticed alot of coaches like Prevost have than bland white corian counter top and cabinet look...No personality in the new coaches at all..They look to sterile and all those flat straight lines...YUK...Not for me...Most of the walls in my house are pecky cypress over drywall and I have 10x10 Cypress beams in all the room ceilings..The fireplace is all river rock and My porch has a tin roof..I accented the entire porch with Wagon wheels and a old whicky barrel..I liike that old country feel and thats what Im shooting for in this coach
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cody
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« Reply #16 on: June 19, 2007, 07:37:26 PM »

Next time I run into you in the chat room I'll walk you thru the process, it's time consuming but you can get pro results if you take your time.
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jdr
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« Reply #17 on: June 21, 2007, 01:31:38 AM »

Baltic birch plywood for all of the walls and cabinet structure. Very cheap high quality plywood. All solid cherry interior with cream color shades and upholstery with copper counter tops. Cherry is cheap for a hard wood,easy to work and has a nice reddish color I like. Just oil it and your done.The cherry wood looks alot richer than it is. You can spend a LOT of money on hard wood if you want to and you will use more than you think. I would try to stay away from the soft wood only because it will dent easily. If money isn't an object, ebony or pink ivory is ONLY about $90-$100 a board foot!
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Gary LaBombard
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« Reply #18 on: June 21, 2007, 05:02:59 AM »

FWIW I thought I would mention that anyone needing a mixture of fully cured hardwoods ready for milling to any dimension you need at a price I am sure you would be pleased with should email Fred Hobe located at Madison, FL.  You can get his email address through our profiles if you are interested. 

Also plan to spend some enjoyable time with a grandfather to our conversion family who can also give you much advise on any aspect of your conversion, especially if you own a MCI but any bus I am sure.  Tell him Gary sent you, you won't meet a nicer man in life.
Gary 
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« Reply #19 on: June 24, 2007, 10:03:22 AM »

my 4905 was completey done in maple<nicly done and even has inpervections in the knots i like it,
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« Reply #20 on: June 24, 2007, 11:12:21 AM »

 Huh

you must have a Thing, for Splinters   Undecided



 Grin
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« Reply #21 on: June 24, 2007, 12:52:51 PM »

Baltic Birch cheap?  It costs at least $30 for a 3/4" 5x5 sheet around here.  3/4" is probably overkill for most uses and 1/2" is sometimes a lot cheaper.  I will admit it is generally cheaper than any hardwood plywood. 

I'm planning on knotty pine wood in my coach simply because it is cheaper than hardwood and lighter too.  Would an epoxy finish make the surface of pine harder?
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« Reply #22 on: June 24, 2007, 01:02:18 PM »

I used grade A oak for all my cabinets. The drawers (and I have lots of them) are all made of poplar, both are good hard woods and built to last. Finished out very nice and you can get many different colored stains for oak.
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« Reply #23 on: June 24, 2007, 01:48:39 PM »

Baltic / Russian birch ply is indeed excellent stuff, albeit with a rather plain grain. I used lots and lots of it in my house (including panelling the entire kitchen and conservatory), largely because it is cheap and it goes well with the birch furniture / kitchen cabinets which are quite fashionable at the moment. I pay around 9 ($18) for a 4mm thick 5'x5' sheet - $30 for a 3/4" (19mm) sheet seems like exceptional value for money - I would buy a truckload at that price and use it to build the whole structure of your coach's interior. I was surprised recently to find a new supplier selling Russian Birch in 8' x 4' sheets (although only in 6.5mm thicknesses), which is a big improvement over the former limitation of only being available in 5' x 5'

My bus interior will all be done in Cherry - a combination of ready-veneered ply, some veneering I will do myself (I hate doing my own veneering, but sometimes it's unavoidable), and hardwood for mouldings. Poplar is a wood I also like a lot (very Art Deco), but I have a deep abiding dislike for anything made of Oak or Knotty Pine - mainly I think because they are both so horribly common.

Jeremy
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« Reply #24 on: June 24, 2007, 05:20:43 PM »

I used cedar and barn siding in my bedroom, Knotty pine in the living room ceiling and lower walls and bath ceiling. some ash and oak wainscot (mixed) on 2 bath walls (upper half) kind of a hodge podge but looks nice.
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« Reply #25 on: June 24, 2007, 08:34:05 PM »

I have never heard of "french polish" done with anything but shellac. It is an old method of finishing furniture and musical instruments. To do a guitar takes many coats and a few weeks to do. It is sort of like "spit-shining" shoes except instead of shoe polish you use shellac and instead of spit you use a drop of oil. I can't imagine trying to do a whole bus interior that way. A more practical way would be to thin down polyurethane and apply it with a rag instead of a brush. It takes a few coats but they go on fast and dry fast and don't run like brushing does on vertical surfaces. It's a much harder and more durable surface than shellac, or lindseed oil which will stain with water or alcohol. Min Wax makes wiping poly but it is a whole lots cheaper if you mix your own.
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« Reply #26 on: June 24, 2007, 11:51:58 PM »

Cabinet finishing is what I do for a living.  There isn't any law that says the uppers have to be the same wood as the lowers. Many custom kitchens are going with a mix and match.  Light uppers, darker lowers.  One type of finish on the wall cabinets, another on the island cabinet.  The mixture gives the cabinets more of a furniture appearance.  As pretty as maple is when new and white, it does not stay that way very long.  It is very light sensative and will turn a light golden color with age, usually within a year. I plan on using a light stain on our uppers and a shade or two darker on the lowers.

Don and Cary
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« Reply #27 on: June 25, 2007, 01:01:11 PM »

Um... why is Cedar "out" ?  I've had it (T&G)on my ceiling in da bus for 5 years now and it's never been anything but great! Absolutely love it...
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cody
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« Reply #28 on: June 25, 2007, 01:09:51 PM »

Cedar works great for a ceilings, my concern would be in using it for the cabinetry that it might be prone to nicks and dings.  I suggested hardwood for the cabinetry or any area's that might be in the line of fire when moving things around or bumped into with other things like chairs. I've done custom cabinetry for many years and have always cautioned people about the vulnerabilty of softwoods for cabinetry, if a person is careful they look great for many years but one ding and it's there for eternity too lol, unless it's a minor compression dent and can be steamed out.
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