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Author Topic: fuel milage  (Read 1427 times)
ttomas
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« on: June 19, 2007, 03:57:31 PM »

What mpg should I expect to get in my mc9 6v92ta 4 speed auto?  I know the "if you have to ask, you can't afford it thing", but I  have to ask.Thanks Tom
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« Reply #1 on: June 19, 2007, 07:48:41 PM »

Greetings Tom, and welcome to the board!

With our MC9 - mechanical (non-ddec) we get around 7.  We don't go much above 65.  No hurry.   Grin

Of course, running the a/c or generator will affect this.

Hope this helps,

Phil

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RJ
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« Reply #2 on: June 19, 2007, 08:39:31 PM »

Tom -

The most accurate answer to your question is: "It Depends".

If you're running 65 on flat level ground for hours on end w/o any headwind and a cruise control, 6-7 mpg.

If you're going back and forth over the Rockies, Sierras, Cascades, etc. then 5-6 mpg.  (Appalachians don't count - they're only speed bumps compared to the west.)

If your coach has the stock 144 gallon fuel tank, figure filling up at 500 mile intervals.  Even tho you can go further, this is a safe mileage figure to avoid the embarrassment and headache that comes with an empty fuel tank and having to re-prime the beast.

If your coach has the optional tank in the front baggage bin, then you can safely go 750 between fill-ups - unless you run your diesel genset excessively, which also applies to the previous paragraph, too.

Highly suggest that you ALWAYS fill your tank when putting your coach away for an extended period of time.  Helps keep the bugs out.

Weight is an enemy of fuel mileage - keep that in mind as you build.

These things have the aerodynamics of a brick - keep the profile as clean as possible to assist, not resist, airflow.

FWIW & HTH. . .

 Wink
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RJ Long
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« Reply #3 on: June 19, 2007, 09:30:42 PM »

My DDEC2 ATEC has a low of 5.2mpg and a high of 5.6mpg.
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Barn Owl
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« Reply #4 on: June 19, 2007, 09:34:24 PM »

Tom,

Not sure if you were joking about the Eastern speed bumps, but a hill is a hill. Have you been to West Virginia? Ok, so out west you can climb for a solid 20 miles and then take a 20 mile trip down hill. On the east, it is 20 one mile trips up and 20 one mile trips down. It still equals crappy fuel mileage. Now I destroyed my mileage on my last trip. I have a 4106 and got around 6.3. Why? Probably because of a combination of several things, a toad, lots of ups and downs, and 70mph (The bus runs at 70 way too easily). Another factor, N70 injectors. I had a devil of a time keeping it out of the black smoke while in the “hills”. Finally, we used the bus as a car; it went everywhere, even on the downtown trips. Coming across the Rockies with clogged air filters this bus got 7.5mpg. The rest of the way home 8mpg…..FWIW

Laryn
« Last Edit: June 20, 2007, 11:23:17 AM by Barn Owl » Logged

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« Reply #5 on: June 19, 2007, 10:16:03 PM »

Laryn -

I'm the one that was teasing about the Appalachian speed bumps, not Tom.

BTW, it's about 45 miles from Reno, NV to Donner Summit on I-80, and you climb from 4500' to 7239' in that distance.  From the summit, you've got 70 miles of 4, 5 and 6 % grades WB until you get to Newcastle (400'), which is about a half hour out of Sacramento (25').

So, yup, we've got some LONG grades to go up and down out here!!   Shocked

Which, of course, is why I feel so strongly that our coaches should be equipped with Jake brakes. . .

Hmmmm. . . I wonder how much better your fuel mileage would be if you had the stock N60 injectors in your 4106?

FWIW & HTH. . .

 Wink
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RJ Long
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« Reply #6 on: June 20, 2007, 06:17:46 AM »

Sorry Tom, I meant to welcome you to the group, got distracted, and somehow left that part out. Then I was going to reply to Russ, so in skipping your welcome it looks like my comments were directed to you. I shouldn't try to post when I need to be in bed.  Embarrassed

Russ, I wish I did have N60 instead of N70 injectors. One of those things I got from the PO. Bigger is not always better. Unfortunately there is not much I can do about it at this time.  Sad

Laryn
« Last Edit: June 20, 2007, 01:02:49 PM by Barn Owl » Logged

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« Reply #7 on: June 20, 2007, 08:32:41 AM »

Laryn -

I'm the one that was teasing about the Appalachian speed bumps, not Tom.


Russ, I am curious. Have you ever been back east to drive over our speed bumps? Although not as long as some of the ones out west, there are some that really can give you a pucker factor. LOL
Richard
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« Reply #8 on: June 20, 2007, 09:35:04 AM »

Laryn, I have the brown-tag 65's on my 8v71 and they put entirely too much fuel out the tailpipe anytime I'm above 3000MSL. While I appreciate the extra power at lower elevations, it's almost a show-stopper trying to cross the Rockies with her... huge plumes of black smoke, temps hovering at 200, climbing at 15mph. Bah!

I too wish they had left the stock injector setup when they did the out-of-frame. I'm putting the stock 60's back in when I get some extra $. My old Blue Velvet had that setup and she never smoked (unless I was in the wrong gear).

I've gotten anywhere from 7.25mpg (crossing the Divide) to 8.5mpg (flats of the Midwest) in 10k miles of Interstate driving with the 4108 w/ V730, no toad, and ~25k pounds. The old 4106 was more variable with economy, 7.5mpg (mountains) on up to 10.2mpg on one fill-up on a run from Cheyenne to SLC. I've found that my inverter setup that runs the forward A/C to use much less fuel than the diesel genset, which gives better overall mpg figures, I'm sure.

Although I'm likely pushing it, I plan fuel stops around 900 miles apart and that strill leaves me about 30-50 gal. of reserve. I have a 165gal tank.

FWIW,
Brian Brown
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Brian Brown
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« Reply #9 on: June 20, 2007, 09:36:10 AM »

Tom,
I get 7-7.5 consistently and the best I've averaged is 8 with the same drive train you have. That includes the limited amount of East coast mountains I've driven. My coach is still pretty much a shell (light) so that might explain the slightly better than average mileage. I don't usually drive over 65 either.
Hank
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« Reply #10 on: June 20, 2007, 12:47:52 PM »

speed bumps in the east

go to colorada every year to ride trail bikes and 4 wheelers. Toughest pull is black mountain  on i40 in nc
 fancy gap on i77 is not to bad either

uncle ned
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« Reply #11 on: June 20, 2007, 01:53:53 PM »

My bus has a relatively fresh engine (8V71) with n60 injectors and stock timing and a stock 4 speed.  I also have a very accurate fuel gauge to correct for the wide variation in fill-ups.  I've found that my fill ups vary by almost 10 gallons making uncorrected fuel milage calculations very missleading.   My gauge corrected mileage has been: 6 mpg heavily loaded pulling a trailer east over the rockies as fast as I could; 7 MPG empty bus pulling empty trailer west over the same route, again as fast as possible; 8.25 MPG round trip from Kentucky to South Carolina through the eastern mountains, trying to maintain 65; 8.75 MPG round trip from southern Ky to Cincinnati with just the now converted bus maintaining 65 on an almost flat route.   Even with the small injectors I make some  black smoke above about 6000 foot elevation at full throttle.
Regards
Jerry 4107 1120
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ttomas
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« Reply #12 on: June 20, 2007, 02:44:20 PM »

Thanks for all the info . This is a really great site and very informative. I very much appreciate all the help and info. Thanks to all, ttomas/ Tom
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