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Author Topic: Plans for short & long "pit" ramp  (Read 9368 times)
Sojourner
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« on: May 12, 2006, 10:18:00 AM »

For those not to choose building a pit & still DIY own repair work…this may be of interest.

Have two choices of plans.
Plan 1 is moveable six feet long ramp for a pair wheel lift to craw under…weight about 50 lbs each.
Note: First 3 attachment apply to this plan.
Purchase the following;
1)   8pcs 2x12x8 feet long…. If you prefer wider than 12 inch, just add more planks
2)   4pcs or more for than 8 planks ½ x 48 inch of NC treaded rods. 40pcs of nuts & flat washers
Direction;
1)   Cut treaded rod into 14 ½ inch long or longer for added planks to attain 20pcs
2)   Debur rod’s ends
3)   Cut diagonal as per-drawing
4)   Drill all but one holes 3 inch away from outline of cut pieces.
5)   Drill last hole centrally…about 2 inch from top & bottom line near beginning leading edge.

It will give you 11 ½ inch added clearance while air up with safely clearance incase air bag blow.

Reason for planks standing on sides to avoid cracking while uneven earth surface from weight of coach.

This is what charter bus garage in Detroit metro area using and already 10 years old.

Not shown stop block at end of top flat to keep from rolling off….2x2 attach via long screw from top down.

If your coach clearance is too low to clear to drive on……drive over spare planks before ramps.

Cautions…have someone guide you on to avoid unnecessary damage.
 

 

Plan 2 for long pit on concrete surface;
Note: 4th attachment apply to this plan.

Where I brought my MCI-8 at DOM Charter in Detroit, Mi.  Have a pair of 12 laminated (no glue) 2x12 planks on side that come to total of 18 inch wide lay on concrete floor. They bolted together with stop block at end.

Bolts are located so it 3” from top & bottom about every 3 ft apart using NC ½” threaded rods with large flat washers.

Eight ft or less of taper laminated ramp of same to get on. All main ramps’ planks are stagger to strengthen. Ramps are set apart so that front wheel travels in middle with inter dual partly on. It too heavy to move by hand. Another word it won’t slide or shift out of gage easily. This is design for 258” MCI -7,8,9 wheelbase with 8” ground clearance.

It you need more than 11 ½ inch plus bus’s clearance, and then nail each layer to 4 pieces high of ¾” plywood at each wheel’s footing. First one made 6” longer (3” overlap each end) x same width than the next pieces to develop a stepping slope for drive wheel. Front wheel’s plywood is 3” longer then next piece with stop attached on even end.

Caution…this arrangement should only be onto concrete surface or otherwise ramps can roll or flip sideway on dirt ground. Also you should have a person guide you on correctly. If in shop…check to see if bus will clear over head while driving on raise ramps.

Material list for 40 footer bus;
1)   48pcs of 2x12x12ft ramp
2)   24pcs of 2x12x6ft ramp
3)   12pcs of 2x12x8ft climbing ramp….slope cut diagonal to make two units.
4)   40pcs or more to suit your desire, of NC ½ "x 20" threaded rods
5)   Double the amount of pieces of nuts & large flat washers
6)   Metal strap to tie the ramp scope to ramp runner with bolts
Notes; all wood pressure treated & metal bar connect slope to main ramp.

All planks are staggered to added strength…top dimension are first row & bottom dimension are second row & so on.
 

Still not cheap but less than pit project.

Ohh…..need a good HD low profile creeper with nice head rest and head band with led light or headlight.

FWIW

Sojourn for Christ, Jerry
« Last Edit: May 12, 2006, 10:31:26 AM by Sojourner » Logged
H3Jim
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« Reply #1 on: May 12, 2006, 12:45:53 PM »

As usual Sojourner posts good stuff!

I made some ramps similar to these, only they are only 8" tall.  Its enough to get under  to do what I need to, and if the bags were to fail and go down to the stops, I would still have enough room to not get hurt and to get out.  If they were any higher I couldn't put them under the bus to run up on them.

When I drive on to the ramps, I first put them in front of the tires, then I measure how far I want the bus to move.  Next I put my step ladder exactly that far from the front bumper.  when I drive up, I just go till I touch the ladder, and I know I'm in a good spot.  Even a 2" x2" is not big enough to either stop the bus or even notice as it runs off the end.  I'm not sure a 4 x 4 would be big enough either, but it would prevent you from skidding the ramps under the bus bus prior to driving on them.  The bus tires are large enough they can roll over a lot without noticing.
« Last Edit: May 13, 2006, 08:12:07 AM by H3Jim » Logged

Jim Stewart
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« Reply #2 on: May 12, 2006, 12:49:47 PM »

Sojourner,

Nice ramps and diagram.

Jim,

Great tip, sometimes the obvious is hard to see!

Cliff
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Sojourner
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« Reply #3 on: May 12, 2006, 01:21:11 PM »

I agree Jim about stop-block do very little to feel.

Good idea of using a ladder to index your stop point.

However if all possible have someone monitor closely to tell driver when to stop.

If you have an old large mirror to stand on ground or floor at an angle so driver can see 45 degree of horizonal viewing of left front wheel & ramp position...that would give you both view...guide & stop at same time.

Higher stop-block can be add but ramp should be longer for body to clear as it rise.

That long "pit" ramp plan has longer scope rise so that bottom coach will clear the hump. That done on cad for coach with 258" wb at 8" ground clearance.

FWIW

Sojourn for Christ, Jerry
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NCbob
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« Reply #4 on: May 12, 2006, 02:28:55 PM »

Perhaps it's my frugal sensitivities but let me add my $0.02 worth.  I've calculated (rightly or wrongly) that the ramps are 13" wide.
I have no idea what the cross grain of a 2X12 will support, but having worked with my son in construction for a while... it's huge.

Since the bottom of the ramp is supported by a solid (be it earth or concrete) might it be practical to use a 2X12 spacer between the
full length boards at each threaded rod?  The integrity of the ramp would be maintained but the whole thing would be much lighter.

If one were concerned about the strength or integrity of the assembly the use of the spacers would allow it to be built , perhaps one or two planks wider for better weight distribution.  Wider would also be less probability of tipping should the driver stray a bit one way or the other.

Being an older guy weight and transport of these ramps would be among my concerns along with their load bearing ability.  Adding a
4X4 at or near the end would certainly give me more peace of mind.  The coach would balk at the attempt to override it.

These suggestions are offered in a constructive manner...certainly not offered to demean Sojourner's or anyone elses design.
"Inquiring minds want to know".

FWIW

NCbob
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H3Jim
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« Reply #5 on: May 12, 2006, 03:22:19 PM »

I actually did put spacers in to save wieght, and mine are 17" wide, still a little narrow, but I can get part of both tires of the dually's up there.  And yes, having used treated lumber, these pups are HEAVY.  All I can do is drag them, I can't even think about lifting them.  Like Sojourner suggests, I used 1/2" threaded rod to clamp them together.  My coach so far is 38,000 lbs, and there has been  no hint of these things not holding the weight.  MIne are about 6 ft long, and had I to do it over, I would make them a little shorter, and maybe a little wider as well.

I did not use the plywood for ramp starters / holders.  I just angled the cut of the 2 by, the slope is gentle enough that it's never even thought of sliding.  Those big tires again.  Hell, sometimes its hard to tell I even went up the ramps, except for I'm close to my step ladder.
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Jim Stewart
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kyle4501
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« Reply #6 on: May 12, 2006, 06:52:28 PM »

When the ride height valve died on my 4501, I made some ramps. DO NOT underestimate the power of gravity on a bus!

Also, the bus required a very long ramp due to one side down & one side up. I had a 4x4 bolted to the ramp, & the rear axle rode up on it with no problem (reverse on a cruiser is fast!).

My ramp was only 8" tall & I needed a shovel to make room to sneak under to access the ride height valve.

I am so looking forward to having a concrete pad to park her on.

kyle4501
« Last Edit: May 12, 2006, 06:54:32 PM by kyle4501 » Logged

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NewbeeMC9
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« Reply #7 on: May 12, 2006, 08:28:23 PM »

I'll chime in with what I do without suggestion or recommendation.

 I have some scraps from the local log home place and some scrap peices of 2x12 to lead up onto them.  The blocks fit together to make a large pad and the 2x12 fit under the lip to make it a stable ramp.  it all pulls apart and stacks in the bay.  The price was right and it is amazing how much room you have once you get past the outer part.  I haven't used it on the front yet so no report there.

my $.02 

ps. a local bus shop has large ones made from railroad ties bolted in a designated bay.
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NCbob
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« Reply #8 on: May 15, 2006, 07:39:20 AM »

I, for one, would like to sse either a pic or drawing of your 'contraption'.  I sort of like the idea of moving several light parts around and being able to stack 'em in a bay than to wrestle with a preassembled ramp that outweighs my wife...er me.  Nells, Bells guys!  I'm 70 years old and I don't have the body strength to wrestle alligators anymore!

NCbob
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NewbeeMC9
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« Reply #9 on: May 15, 2006, 11:41:40 AM »

Ergo NCBob


http://pg.photos.yahoo.com/ph/newbeemc9/detail?.dir=4b73&.dnm=9751re2.jpg&.src=ph

The 2x12 helps ramp up to and stabilize the block, the block will flip up if you try without it.  It was also scrap from deckbuilding neighbor.

If you want to spend a little cash, you could do the same thing with the plastic LEGO type things from Camping World They are lighter and come with a fancy case.

The builders put scraps at the road occasionally They're off I26 right after you get into SC.  I had a buddy that lived over there and picked some up for me when he found them.
« Last Edit: May 15, 2006, 11:45:44 AM by NewbeeMC9 » Logged

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Danny
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« Reply #10 on: May 15, 2006, 11:48:34 PM »

Hey, I see another project in my future.

Thanks
Danny
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« Reply #11 on: May 16, 2006, 05:31:11 AM »

Another $02 worth! I had a local saw mill cut some cotton wood into 3ea 12" X 12" x 10' pices. Had one of them cut diagoaily into giant wedge.  Cost very little, strong as all get out but heavy. Have a friend watch while you drive on.
JimH
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« Reply #12 on: May 16, 2006, 07:04:46 AM »

I have always found it very difficult to drive up on to ramps with a stick shift. Trying to get enough power to climb the ramp and then get on the brakes without going over can be tricky. Very hard to heel and toe in my 4104.

My bus still has the ICC valve which is what I use to control the brake when climbing the ramp.  I think I am going to keep that setup even after converting to spring brakes for just that reason.

Len Silva
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« Reply #13 on: May 17, 2006, 10:02:30 PM »

Len, I think there is a distinct possibility that the ICC valve circuitry and the spring brake circuitry are incompatible. The ICC circuit disables ALL of the rest of the air system when it is turned on; it was intended to give you a way to apply air to the rear axle if any air hose blew that wasn't in that circuit.

If a hose to the rear cans blew, you were left with your Johnson bar. On a long down grade, that would leave you with looking for a place to crash.

At least, that's my understanding of how all that works. Perhaps someone with more experience could clear this up a bit.

Tom Caffrey PD4106-2576
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« Reply #14 on: September 03, 2007, 09:19:47 PM »

Johnson bar Huh  You don't mean... Shocked  Good one Wink Grin

John
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