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Author Topic: is starting fluid addictive  (Read 2011 times)
ttomas
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« on: July 13, 2007, 09:18:43 PM »

I am really curious as to whether or not ether is addictive to engines or is that a myth. I used to need it for my old Cummins, but not for this 6v92. Thanks,  tomas
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gus
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« Reply #1 on: July 13, 2007, 09:30:15 PM »

My guess is, no, because I only need it on my 671 in cold weather.
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PD4107-152
PD4104-1274
Ash Flat, AR
TomC
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« Reply #2 on: July 13, 2007, 10:54:58 PM »

It all depends on the health of your engine.  I've seen Detroits that had to be ethered in 60 degree weather.  Since Diesels are heat engines (rather than spark engines), if it is worn where it doesn't produce enough heat to fire off the fuel, ether is needed.  This myth is only true in that usually only really worn engines need to be ethered regularly, and since they are on the way out, have to be ethered more and more to get them running-hence the ether habit.  On a healthy engine, properly done, ethering will not hurt the engine.  Good Luck, TomC
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Tom & Donna Christman. '77 AMGeneral 10240B; 8V-71TATAIC V730.
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« Reply #3 on: July 13, 2007, 11:13:09 PM »

Ether used incorrectly can damage and break compression rings... ultimately making it more "addictive" for the engine. It's far better to invest in a block heater and heat it up prior to lighting it off instead of starting it cold with ether. That nasty-sounding looping idle and cloud of acrid smoke on a cold day can all be avoided with a block heater. The DD's were manufactured tough enough to start out cold on ether, but heating it up slow and gently vs. fast and violently seems to be the smart ticket to me.

HTH,
Brian B.
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Brian Brown
4108-216 w/ V730
Longmont, CO
TomC
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« Reply #4 on: July 14, 2007, 06:35:16 AM »

The best trick is to both heat and pre lube the engine.  Their is a starter made that has an oil pump on the end.  When you hit the starter button the starter will spin only powering the pump until a set oil pressure is reached (like 20psi) then it will engage and start the engine already pumped up.  Makes for the longest possible engine life.  Not sure if they make a left handed one though.  Good Luck, TomC
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Tom & Donna Christman. '77 AMGeneral 10240B; 8V-71TATAIC V730.
WEC4104
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« Reply #5 on: July 14, 2007, 07:08:30 AM »

Back before the rebuild, my 6-71 was a bit reluctant to light off in cooler temps.  I have a block heater so that was the ticket, even in the coldest temps.

In situations when the temp was cooler (not frigid) and I hadn't planned ahead and used the heater, I benefited from a tip I read on this board. Instead of extended cranking for 7-10 seconds, they recommended the following:  Crank for 3 seconds, then wait 20-30 seconds, and try again. During the wait the heat created from the inital crank gets distributed in the cylinders, making the next try easier.  It is also a lot easier on the batteries.  It also keeps you from dumping a ton of fuel into the cyclinders, so the smoke on start up is greatly reduced.  I had good success with this.

When I bought my 4104, it had a push button on the side panel next to the driver's left arm. It was labeled "CAUTION ETHER".  It was hooked to an automatic ether injecter system back in the engine compartment. It looked like some sort of aftermarket kit. There is a regular spray can of ether resting in a holder, and tubing connecting it to the intake. It hasn't worked since I bought it, buty it could be it just needs a fresh can of ether.  Unfortunately the can size is a shorter fatter size and the cans I have seen in stores won't fit.   On the otherhand, with the rebuild and heater I haven't needed it "ether".   
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If you're going to be dumb, you gotta be tough.
Barn Owl
Roanoke, VA
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« Reply #6 on: July 14, 2007, 08:48:06 AM »

I have to completely agree with Brian, I invested in a block heater and it was the nicest thing I did for my bus. The benefits are numerous, and I wish I had time this morning to list them, but maybe someone else can or you can do an archive search. If no one does I can address it later. Itís easy and inexpensive to do, expect to spend ~$45 on the heater. I had to use a propane torch to heat and remove the old plug.
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L. Christley - W3EYE Amateur Extra
Blue Ridge Mountains, S.W. Virginia
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Barn Owl
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« Reply #7 on: July 14, 2007, 08:58:23 AM »

I could only get a 1000w to fit where I had to put it, but it works fine.
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L. Christley - W3EYE Amateur Extra
Blue Ridge Mountains, S.W. Virginia
Itís the education gained, and the ability to apply, and share, what we learn.
Have fun, be great, that way you have Great Fun!
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