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Author Topic: MC-8 Radiators  (Read 1384 times)
DavidInWilmNC
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1978 MC-8 as I bought it May 2005




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« on: August 08, 2007, 03:33:19 PM »

Ok, so I'm going to start the fun task of replacing all the cooling system hoses this weekend.  I'm going to start with the ones that connect the radiators to the pipes leading to the engine.  Does anybody have any hints on removing these things?  I'm curious as to how heavy they are. 

I'll also be ordering a couple of thermostats to replace while I've got the mess disconnected.  How about the water pump?  Is it commonly replaced preventatively?  Thanks for any info.

David
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TomC
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« Reply #1 on: August 08, 2007, 04:16:49 PM »

Those "smaller radiators" are on the heavy side, so watch it.  Best for a two person job.  Are you going to have the radiators gone through now also?  I think it would be a smart idea, so you don't have to do it again for awhile.  Good Luck, TomC
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Tom & Donna Christman. '77 AMGeneral 10240B; 8V-71TATAIC V730.
DavidInWilmNC
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« Reply #2 on: August 08, 2007, 04:22:58 PM »

Those "smaller radiators" are on the heavy side, so watch it.  Best for a two person job.  Are you going to have the radiators gone through now also?  I think it would be a smart idea, so you don't have to do it again for awhile.  Good Luck, TomC

The radiators were 'done' - whatever that means - when the engine was rebuilt 30,000 miles ago (about 12 years ago).  Carolina Coach (Carolina Trailways) had the engine rebuilt prior to selling it to the church that I bought it from.  They appear to be fine, but I'll sort of play that by ear.  Thanks.

David
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TomC
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« Reply #3 on: August 09, 2007, 10:32:22 PM »

12 years is a long time for calcium and other crud to build up on the inside of the radiator.  It would be prudent to at least have the cores looked at and perhaps pressure tested now that you're working on them.  Good Luck, TomC
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Tom & Donna Christman. '77 AMGeneral 10240B; 8V-71TATAIC V730.
edroelle
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« Reply #4 on: August 10, 2007, 05:20:07 AM »

If you are satisfied with the cooling performance and the exterior fins of the radiator are good, I would not remove the radiators.  I might flush them out - while in place.

The radiators will need to be in place to put the hoses on anyway.  You may need to loosen the 2 bolts at the bottom and 2 straps on top, to wiggle the new hoses on.

Check the seals around the radiator and to the rear door.

Ed Roelle
Flint, MI
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gumpy
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« Reply #5 on: August 10, 2007, 06:02:41 AM »

As Ed said, you don't need to remove the radiators if you are only replacing the hoses. In fact, you have to remove the hoses
first if you are removing the radiators, and the hoses go back on last.

If you're putting silicon hoses back on, cut them long enough that you can double clamp all the fittings. These hoses never
seal to the pipes, and continually leak; especially during winter in cold country.

craig
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Craig Shepard
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TomC
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« Reply #6 on: August 10, 2007, 08:23:14 AM »

As Ed and Craig both have said, you don't NEED to take the radiators out and check them, but won't you be kicking yourself in the butt if you find you have a heating problem next year and have to go through all this rig a ma ro again?  Just a very strong suggestion-if it were me-I'd want to know what shape the radiators were in myself.  If they are in good shape, only time and a bit of money to the radiator shop will have been wasted-rather than frustration from a heating problem if they are not in good shape.  Good Luck, TomC
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Tom & Donna Christman. '77 AMGeneral 10240B; 8V-71TATAIC V730.
DavidInWilmNC
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« Reply #7 on: August 10, 2007, 09:29:38 AM »

12 years is a long time, but there's been a lot of sitting during that period - on 30,000 miles.  The exterior fins of the radiators look excellent, there are no bent fins at all, and there don't seem to be any cooling issues.  When the engine shut down a couple of weeks ago due to a split hose, the dash gauge read right at 210, which I believe is the correct shutoff temp.  It never even approached overheating while driving in 95+ degree temps with slight hills.  I may end up removing the radiators to check anyway, as I found a very small amount of slimy crap on the inside of the top hose when I got it off.  Once it dried, it sort of just disappeared.  It almost felt like the hose itself was slimy, like rubber hoses sometimes do when they get old.  It probably wouldn't be a bad thing to flush the cooling system, though.  How does one go about flushing an engine like this (8V-71)?  I've done it on many cars, but with the volume and flow of the water in an engine this size, I doubt those methods would work.  Thanks for the info!

David
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Jerry32
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« Reply #8 on: August 10, 2007, 10:09:39 AM »

One of the best tests for a radiator is the flow test that a radiator shop can perform quickly and if I were that far along I would do that. Jerry
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gumpy
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« Reply #9 on: August 10, 2007, 10:51:50 AM »

Do a search on calgon. There were some threads on this last spring. A couple of us have run calgon through the cooling system and the flushed completely several times with clean water. I used softened water from the house to clean and flush, and distilled water to mix with the antifreeze.   Seemed to work well for me, though I only had about 40K on my engine, so I didn't get much out of it, but it had been about 7 years so I figured it was time.

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Craig Shepard
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http://bus.gumpydog.com - "Some Assembly Required"
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