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Author Topic: Propane Plumbing  (Read 4020 times)
maria-n-skip
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« on: September 07, 2007, 08:18:09 AM »


 After reading Dreamscape thread on his refrig a question came to my mind.

   My current propane plumbing is copper and rubber gas hose. I am thinking of replacing the copper.

   What are the current thoughts what to use for propane lines?
   

 Skip
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cody
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« Reply #1 on: September 07, 2007, 08:30:54 AM »

Copper tubing has taken a drastic jump in price but is still one of the best ways to plumb LP, one of the new systems is a Pex line, it is flexible and seems to work well but I'm not comfortable with the connectors yet, you have to be very careful and get a tight fit, I've always used copper and flare fittings, those I can do lol.
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Len Silva
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« Reply #2 on: September 07, 2007, 08:36:15 AM »

Regardless of the material you choose to use, I recommend a manifold systems with shut off valves and individual runs to each appliance.  Makes it easier to troubleshoot and if you do develop a leak, it can be isloated and the rest of the appliances remain usable.

Len
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Eagle
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« Reply #3 on: September 07, 2007, 08:41:38 AM »

From Propane tank regulator or as close as possible use Black pipe to your appliances or as close as possible and then copper tubing to the appliances.  Check all joints with SOAPY water using a paint brush to apply soapy water to joints.  A manifold system is highly recommended with shut off valves going to each appliance.
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cody
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« Reply #4 on: September 07, 2007, 08:41:51 AM »

Len is absolutely right, be sure to be able to isolate each line with shut offs.
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maria-n-skip
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« Reply #5 on: September 07, 2007, 08:47:13 AM »

 Len, Good idea! I will include that in my replumb.

 Cody, do you double flair your copper tubing?

  Eagle, I was thinking of black pipe for the straight long runs through the bulk heads.

 Skip
« Last Edit: September 07, 2007, 08:51:14 AM by maria-n-skip » Logged
cody
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« Reply #6 on: September 07, 2007, 08:50:11 AM »

One of the things to watch for if your using black pipe is to properly support it at regular intervals, black pipe is rigid and sometimes doesn't like being bounced down the road, this can be minimized by supporting it, all gas lines should be supported at least at 30 inch intervals but black pipe is more critical to do so. And checking each fitting with soapy water will find leaks, if it's got a leak it will bubble when you spray the soapy water on it, propane detectors are also a good idea, they will warn you of a leak.  It's also a good idea to vent your propane tank compartment to the outside, and keep a fire extinguisher close by, it's worth it to be a little cautious here.  More and more, people are going to the Pex lines, it seems they are much more forgiving of road movement but they need to be supported properly too.
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maria-n-skip
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« Reply #7 on: September 07, 2007, 08:55:24 AM »

 Cody,
    Thanks for the support parameters.
  I am running pex for the water......red white and blue......Shouldn't propane be orange?

    I know in the Natural gas realm splices and joints have a special compression tool and are highly compress together
    alot more sturdy than the normal water fittings and band clamp.

   I certainly wouldn't want anyone to confuse a water line for a gas line.

 Skip
« Last Edit: September 07, 2007, 09:02:18 AM by maria-n-skip » Logged
Dreamscape
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« Reply #8 on: September 07, 2007, 08:58:38 AM »

Coming from California I thought they required black pipe. They say copper is not good. I don't have a link to prove it though.

I plan to run black pipe with shut offs at all appliances, stubbing up with flex to each unit. Was not aware of using Pex, will look into it. Only planning to run to refer. and stove.

Is there a code that says what to use?

Paul
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TomC
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« Reply #9 on: September 07, 2007, 08:59:00 AM »

Since the stove and furnace are my only propane appliances, they are both right next to each other with the propane tank directly below.  I have an electric solenoid (gas approved) after the hand valve on the tank.  I only turn on the gas when needed.  Also have a gas detector inside next to those appliances.  Personally don't like propane-have seen many an RV burn up because of a gas leak.  Being heavier than air, the gas can pool before it reaches an open flame. Always be careful and fully support the gas lines.  Good Luck, TomC
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cody
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« Reply #10 on: September 07, 2007, 09:00:53 AM »

It takes a little practice to get a good flare but the tools are inexpensive and I've had good luck with them, I leave about 1/8 inch of tubing sticking out of the tool when I clamp it on the tubing and make sure the flaring tool is centered in the tubing, if you have it at an angle you will get an uneven flare or crack one of the sides of it so it does take a little practice to get it right.  The only tools you'll need for it are a flaring clamp, it's a double bar arangement with a pivot on one end, it has several size holes along it for different size tubing, you clamp the tubing in it, the flaring tool fits over the clamping tool with the flaring point inside the tubing, it has a handle that you turn and it turns down into the tubing expanding it onto the flared opening of the clamp, the tubing is cut to length with a tubing cutter that has a wheel that you turn around the tubing and it cuts a groove into the sidewall, that way it doesn't crush the tubing and cuts it off straight.  Different states have different codes so you should check to see what your state requires
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maria-n-skip
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« Reply #11 on: September 07, 2007, 09:06:05 AM »

 Cody,
     When I referred to double flair. There is a little nubbin type insert that one uses to create a role on the end
 of the flair...........I mostly used that set up for building steel brake lines.

TomC,
        As usual your conversion is a lesson in efficiency. My propane tank is inside a box with vent holes in the bottom to the outside.
           I mean that in a good way for you posts always teach.

  Skip
« Last Edit: September 07, 2007, 09:15:29 AM by maria-n-skip » Logged
cody
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« Reply #12 on: September 07, 2007, 09:08:15 AM »

That sounds like a compression fitting, do you mean where you place the fitting over the tubing and then a small ring over the tubing and tighten it onto the connector?
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maria-n-skip
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« Reply #13 on: September 07, 2007, 09:13:15 AM »


  You do your normal flair with a little bit more sticking out then you place the nubbin on the pipe and retighten down.
 
    It rolls the tubing to create that small donut around the edge.


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cody
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« Reply #14 on: September 07, 2007, 09:17:16 AM »

Not familier with that technique, I've always just used the single flare.
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