Bus Conversions dot Com Bulletin Board
October 20, 2014, 01:02:15 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: If you had an Online Subscription: You can zoom in to make the text larger and easier to read.
   Home   Help Forum Rules Search Calendar Login Register BCM Home Page Contact BCM  
Pages: [1] 2  All   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Pocket Door  (Read 3543 times)
maria-n-skip
Guest

« on: September 09, 2007, 07:53:41 PM »


 Well after two weeks messing around building one of the two pocket doors needed
 I finally got one up and satisfatory.


   Lessoned learned:

   2-3/4 inch sheets of plywood covered with Formica get very heavey. I didn't want a flimsy door.
  I think the thing could handle a light load .357. I don't really think I need a Safe room.

  So the next one will be honeycombed with 4" holes to lighten it up.

Skip
   

Logged
Dallas
Guest

« Reply #1 on: September 09, 2007, 09:14:44 PM »

Skip,

When we got our PD4103 it had been converted by Custom Coach, (one of their first).
the bathroom door was made from 1" marine grade exterior plywood with formica on both sides. It was held up with a piano hinge screwed into the edge of the plywood with 5/8" brass screws every 2".

When we took it down we found that it weighed close to a hundred pounds!

Since that time, various pieces of it have been a desktop, other pieces have been used as a base to run power tools on.

I never have figured out how it lasted all those years with the piano hinge holding it up!

Dallas
Logged
NewbeeMC9
NewbeeMC9
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1167


1981 MC9 8V71, HT 740




Ignore
« Reply #2 on: September 10, 2007, 03:13:26 AM »


Instead of holes,  how 'bout an SIP,  layer foam insulation with thin plywood on each side then formica.  Strong, light weight, sound dampening,  foam is a little cheaper than plywood too.  could use paneling etc.


do it your way. Smiley

Dallas,  I guess we underestimate piano hinges, spreading the load helps,  or they just don't makem like they used to. Wink
Logged

It's all fun and games til someone gets hurt. Wink
maria-n-skip
Guest

« Reply #3 on: September 10, 2007, 06:50:52 AM »


 Dallas.....Nice to see nothing goes to waste. 1" desktop boy you could rebuild V8 engine on that Wink

 NewbeeMC9,
              I would love to build foam core doors I just haven't worked out how much foam to put in
   so it doesn't blow out the plywood or leave big air pockets. Do I leave vent holes for the extra to come out?
   More investigation I'm sure.


 Skip
Logged
rip
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 203




Ignore
« Reply #4 on: September 10, 2007, 07:10:29 AM »

Skip;
       If you use the right track weight is not a problem.I used Hettich track on my solid cherry doors with raised panels on one side and full length mirrors on the bath sde.They are heavy but the rollers can take the weight and they can't come off the track.Been travelling fulltime over 4 years and no problems. My wife insisted on full length mirrors.Not my idea.
                      Don
Logged
Kristinsgrandpa
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 426


1988 Neoplan AN 340, 6V-92 TA DDEC II, HT 748 ATEC




Ignore
« Reply #5 on: September 10, 2007, 08:19:13 AM »

Skip, at one time I was going to make foam core pocket doors.

I planned on using the blue Dow foam, sandwiched between two pieces of 1/4" oak paneling with a small oak frame around it.  Contact cement or liquid nails should hold it.

I believe the foam is available in 1/2" thick pieces. That would make the door about an inch thick.

Ed
Logged

location: South central Ohio

I'm very conservative, " I started life with nothing and still have most of it left".
maria-n-skip
Guest

« Reply #6 on: September 10, 2007, 08:34:27 AM »


 I must be slow this morning... I was thinking of spray foam not sheet foam.

   Go figure; that would be a lot easier...Smiley


  Skip
Logged
prevost82
82 Prevost 8V92ta 6 speed
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 555


82 Prevost Marathon XL




Ignore
« Reply #7 on: September 10, 2007, 10:40:23 AM »

I made my pocket doors with 3/8 plywood with mirrors on both sides with a raised boarder cap around the edge, 1 3/8 total thickness. They are heavy but the track seem to be holding up and we haven't had any problem with them.
Ron
Logged
Dreamscape
Guest

« Reply #8 on: September 10, 2007, 10:46:23 AM »

I used a standard 1 3/8" hollow core oak for ours, cut it down to the proper height, used standard pocket door hardware and frame, also cut to size. Very light and easy rolling. I will see how it holds up, been in for about a year now.

FWIW,

Paul
Logged
TomCat
It's 4:20 somewhere...
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 411



WWW

Ignore
« Reply #9 on: September 10, 2007, 10:51:04 AM »

I have three pocket doors, all hand made, 6 panel, solid red oak, 3/4 inch thick. Nice and solid, without being too heavy.

Jay
87 SaftLiner
Logged

On The High Plains of Colorado
ol713
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 159



WWW

Ignore
« Reply #10 on: September 10, 2007, 12:42:31 PM »


Hi;
   I have a solid pocket door yet to be installed.
   How do you secure it while on the road? 
                           Thanks,   Merle.                         
Logged
maria-n-skip
Guest

« Reply #11 on: September 10, 2007, 12:52:17 PM »


Merle,
  Closed...I have a pocket door latch from one of the wood supply internet shops.
 
Open....I have seen cloth with snaps or at the back end on the stop velcro glued.
            I don't know how long that would last.
            you can also install the latch on the end off the door like double french doors have.


   There are a lot of ways; it is just how you view it.

  Skip
Logged
JackConrad
Orange Blossom Special II
Global Moderator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 4447


73' MC-8 8V71/HT740 Southwest Florida


WWW
« Reply #12 on: September 10, 2007, 01:02:05 PM »

Here is how we latch our pocket doors (both open and closed).  This photo also shows the corner of the panel door I made. I used 5/4 oak for the frame with 1/4" oak plywood for the panels.  The edges of the door frame were milled using a set of panel cutter bits on my router table. This gave me a nice looking, strong, yet lightweight door.  Jack
Logged

Growing Older Is Mandatory, Growing Up Is Optional
Arcadia, Florida, When we are home
http://s682.photobucket.com/albums/vv186/OBS-JC/
maria-n-skip
Guest

« Reply #13 on: September 10, 2007, 01:20:44 PM »

Jack,

   Very nice job!
 I have become a big router supporter with all the things you can do with one!


 Skip
Logged
DavidInWilmNC
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 594


1978 MC-8 as I bought it May 2005




Ignore
« Reply #14 on: September 10, 2007, 01:30:22 PM »

How are you guys using pocket doors on buses with non-raised roofs (except for later models that have more headroom)?  I'd love to have pocket doors, but I can't sacrifice the room to frame to get a straight surface.  It seems like there's too much curve in the ceiling to mount some sort of track directly on it.  Has anybody successfully installed a pocket door without framing down any?  I seem to remember a while back somebody had a door that slid on drawer slides...

David
Logged
Pages: [1] 2  All   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.18 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!