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Author Topic: LED's revisited  (Read 1363 times)
NCbob
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« on: May 19, 2006, 06:24:35 AM »

I have just written to: http://www.superbrightleds.com/tail-brake-turn.html
asking them to recommend the proper bulbs for my bus.  I sent them all the recommended bulb numbers from the MCI Operators Manual and have asked them for their advice and prices.

It will be interesting to see what they have to offer.

I, for one, do not understand LED technology and honestly don't have the time to immerse myself into studying yet another subject
when the technology and information is out there.

I'll keep you apprised of my progress with them.

NCbob
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NCbob
Guest

« Reply #1 on: May 19, 2006, 03:54:03 PM »

Don't waste your time with these people.  Not only they don't care....they're rude in answering.  MY MISTAKE!

NCbob
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chargePlus
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1951 GMC PD4103-125


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« Reply #2 on: May 20, 2006, 08:50:50 AM »

I, for one, do not understand LED technology and honestly don't have the time to immerse myself into studying yet another subject
when the technology and information is out there.


Bob,

LEDs are pretty easy to understand if you understand how a "regular" diode works. The only difference is that LEDs light up (LE means Light Emitting) when current is applied to them. If you don't know how a diode works, don't worry, its "magic."  Wink

The LED replacement bulbs are typically a group of LEDs with a voltage regulator, to bring the 12v or 24v down to 5v, assembled together and potted. The potting protects against vibration and moisture. Some of the LED replacement bulbs fit easily where the original incandescent bulbs were, while others don't unless there is a lot of room. There are also LED replacement fixtures that replace the original reflector, lamp, and lens assembly.

The LED replacement bulbs for automotive applications are usually referenced by the original bulb number like 1157, 3157, etc. If you want to see if they will fit your situation, check at any of the auto parts stores (Autozone, Advance, NAPA, Pep Boys, etc.) to see if they carry them. I know they used to have LED bulbs in stock. If you replace just the bulbs with LEDs you may need a special flasher module that works with both LEDS and incandescent bulbs.

Incandescent style flasher modules typically use a bi-metal strip that heats up when current passes through it. The heat produced by the current flow causes the strip to bend and break the circuit. The strip then cools and completes the circuit.

http://auto.howstuffworks.com/turn-signal2.htm

The flasher module that can handle both LEDs and incandescent bulbs is usually all solid state and has a small timer circuit (some are adjustable) that controls the blink rate regardless of the load. Try here for a starting point:

http://www.tricoproducts.com/index.cfm?location_id=34

The other type of LED replacement, the full assembly, is described well in this truck lite catalog (right mouse click and choose save-link as, then open with Adobe Acrobat reader):

http://www.truck-lite.com/tl/tl/resources/images/en_US/PDF/01LED.pdf

The big deal about LED lights is that they don't draw very much current to produce the same amount of light as an incandescent bulb. Some of the more efficient LED bulbs draw less than 0.1 amp, and even the biggest ones I have seen draw less than 1 amp, and typically 0.5 amp.

If you have any more questions, please let me know. While Natasha and I want the outside of our PD4103 to be as original as possible, we are going to upgrade to LED lights wherever we can, while retaining the original lenses (which we need to find for the rear of the bus).

- John
« Last Edit: May 20, 2006, 10:03:07 AM by chargePlus » Logged

Sports Car Lover and Bus Nut
1951 GMC PD4103-125 http://www.euliss-uftring.org/DaBus
Sports Car Club of America http://www.ncrscca.com/
Mazda Sports Car Club of NC http://www.msccnc.org/
DrivingMissLazy
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« Reply #3 on: May 20, 2006, 10:10:59 AM »

I, for one, do not understand LED technology and honestly don't have the time to immerse myself into studying yet another subject
when the technology and information is out there.


Bob,

LEDs are pretty easy to understand if you understand how a "regular" diode works. The only difference is that LEDs light up (LE means Light Emitting) when current is applied to them. If you don't know how a diode works, don't worry, its "magic."  Wink

The LED replacement bulbs are typically a group of LEDs with a voltage regulator, to bring the 12v or 24v down to 5v, assembled together and potted. The potting protects against vibration and moisture. Some of the LED replacement bulbs fit easily where the original incandescent bulbs were, while others don't unless there is a lot of room. There are also LED replacement fixtures that replace the original reflector, lamp, and lens assembly.

The LED replacement bulbs for automotive applications are usually referenced by the original bulb number like 1157, 3157, etc. If you want to see if they will fit your situation, check at any of the auto parts stores (Autozone, Advance, NAPA, Pep Boys, etc.) to see if they carry them. I know they used to have LED bulbs in stock. If you replace just the bulbs with LEDs you may need a special flasher module that works with both LEDS and incandescent bulbs.

Incandescent style flasher modules typically use a bi-metal strip that heats up when current passes through it. The heat produced by the current flow causes the strip to bend and break the circuit. The strip then cools and completes the circuit.

http://http://auto.howstuffworks.com/turn-signal2.htm

The flasher module that can handle both LEDs and incandescent bulbs is usually all solid state and has a small timer circuit (some are adjustable) that controls the blink rate regardless of the load. Try here for a starting point:

http://http://www.tricoproducts.com/index.cfm?location_id=34

The other type of LED replacement, the full assembly, is described well in this truck lite catalog (right mouse click and choose save-link as, then open with Adobe Acrobat reader):

http://http://www.truck-lite.com/tl/tl/resources/images/en_US/PDF/01LED.pdf

The big deal about LED lights is that they don't draw very much current to produce the same amount of light as an incandescent bulb. Some of the more efficient LED bulbs draw less than 0.1 amp, and even the biggest ones I have seen draw less than 1 amp, and typically 0.5 amp.

If you have any more questions, please let me know. While Natasha and I want the outside of our PD4103 to be as original as possible, we are going to upgrade to LED lights wherever we can, while retaining the original lenses (which we need to find for the rear of the bus).

- John




I would like to add one more advantage to John's excellent post. The life of the LED is that it is generally considered a lifetime bulb.
Richard


 
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Life should NOT be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in an attractive and well preserved body. But rather to skid in sideways, chocolate in one hand, a good Reisling in the other, body thoroughly used up, totally worn out and screaming:  WOO HOO, what a ride
NCbob
Guest

« Reply #4 on: May 21, 2006, 11:36:28 AM »

And a GOOD afternoon to you John.  Your's is the most comprehensive explanation I've received so far in my quest for LED replacements for my old road whore (she used to be called the Road Princess but I'm not in a good mood with her today).

NOTE: Mr. Moderator, I believe the W word I used above is an acceptable term for a bus when you're angry!  I've certainly called one or two of my ex-wives worse!

My desire was, of course, to convert my 24V front and rear lights to the 21st Century, but  1968 building doesn't necessarily agree with 2006 technology.

We all know that most of our busses didn't get top maintenance and/or repair.  Am I happy I don't own an airplane that's 50 years old!  My MC5A has round aluminum castings which house the Stop, Turn and Tail lights.  What a mess I found when I went searching for reasons as to why new light bulbs wouldn't function.  Steel machine screws tightened into aluminum with absolutely no sign of Never-Seize!  Original mounting holes with screws broken off and steel screws through the back of the reflector to hold the whloe thing tight up against the body..... It's enough to make your a-- want to chew tobacco!

I don't see my predecessors as Craftsmen...I see them as Used Car mechanics!

OK, I've calmed down now...John thanks again for the info....I'm going to make the necessary repairs in order to pass my NC inspection and then I'm going to persue the LED conversion....right after I get the bedroom finished ...and the shower...and the galley........well, one of these days soon!

NCbob
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