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Author Topic: New Puppy!! (w/picture) Suggestions??  (Read 3542 times)
Barn Owl
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« Reply #15 on: September 16, 2007, 07:03:13 PM »

My grandfather uses blue heelers on the farm to run cattle. Great working dogs and very smart. They are a natural herder; I love to watch them work. I have two Jacks and unfortunately, my bus would be too confined to take them along. I do use them to find the mice nests that seem to show up in the bus.

http://www.busconversions.com/bbs/index.php?topic=4743.msg43645;topicseen#msg43645
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L. Christley - W3EYE Amateur Extra
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« Reply #16 on: September 18, 2007, 06:24:53 AM »

We traveled with our German Shepherd mix Punkin, who was the namesake of my website. She was only a few weeks old when we started, and she went with us everywhere. In the Explorer, we would fill the back end with luggage and throw a heavy blanket on top, and she would climb up between the luggage and ceiling and stretch out and sleep or watch the traffic go by. She was a small dog, only about 35 lbs. When we got the bus, she was a bit depressed because she couldn't see out the windows when traveling. She'd often ride on my wife's lap and then she was happy. If she got tired, she'd go sleep on the bed, or the pile of sleeping bags before we got a bed. We didn't stay in parks. The bus was not functional yet, so usually stopped at hotels, and we had long since learned how to get her into hotels, or she would stay in the bus. She was better behaved than the kids were so we never had a problem. She loved to travel and was good about letting us know when she needed to stop.

When she was a pup, my son was 4 months old, and we were stuck in Ogalalla, NE, when the temp got down to 40 below and the car wouldn't start the next morning (actually, the only car in the parking lot that would start was an older cadillac with a 8-4-6 engine in it). I was outside all morning trying to get the car started and Teri was in the room with Pumkin and the baby. Punkin had not peed since 9:00 the previous morning (she was a nervous traveler when she was young, and only peed once a day).  By 11:00, she was getting pretty cross legged, but Teri couln't take her out because of the baby and the extreme cold, and I was still working on the car. She opened the bathroom door which was next to the room door, figuring if Punkin started to go, she could shove her into the bathroom on the tile floor where she could easily clean it up. She heard something, and looked around and Punkin was gone! She found her in the bathtub, squatted down peeing. Only problem was she was turned the wrong way, so she had to wash her feet! 

She was an awesome friend. We lost her in 2003 after 14 years. I still miss her.

Enjoy your new friend, Chaz. With some patience by you, she will become a great companion for you in your travels.

craig
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Craig Shepard
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Chaz
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« Reply #17 on: September 18, 2007, 07:47:46 AM »

Great story, thanx Craig. If this little fella is as good as Tilli was, it will be a pleasure. I miss her LOTS. I great companion is hard to beat! Hope he likes riding on my harley also.  Smiley

  Chaz
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« Reply #18 on: September 18, 2007, 03:00:22 PM »

Craig,

I once had a cocker mix fo 14 1/2 years.  Busy Bitch too was my constant companion as was your Punkin.  A friend once said " I'll bet that if Busy ever died you would never have another dog for the rest of your life, as close as you two are.  I replied that when Busy died I would have another dog the next day.  He expressed disbelief.  I answered that he would understand if he turned the situation around ie. if I died would I want Busy to have the care of a loving person the very next day.  He said "yeah, I get that, but...."  I answered " she loves me as much as I love her and I am sure she would want the void her passing created to be filled as soon as possible.  I have not regretted doing that.  I hope your life circumstance will affor you the opportunity to enjoy Punkin's successor.

I had a Doberman that I put down in 75 after 3 years of bonding.  Like Bo Jangles, I still greive and even weep on occasion.  When you meet someone that has successfully raised a Dobe ask " are Dobes telepathic?" and see what you get for a response.

Here's to Punkin, may she ever live in our memory,

John
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maria-n-skip
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« Reply #19 on: September 18, 2007, 03:49:02 PM »

With dogs this is what it is about...........
  Baby Eva 7 months
  Willow the Wiemy 1.5 yrs
  Lilo the Pug  the grand dame

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« Reply #20 on: September 18, 2007, 07:42:33 PM »

Maria-n-Skip,

Thank you for sharing that really sweet pic.  Yes,it is.

John
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"An uneducated vote is a treasonous act more damaging than any treachery of the battlefield.
The price of apathy towards public affairs is to be ruled by evil men." Plato
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« Reply #21 on: September 19, 2007, 01:50:25 PM »

Hello Chaz,

I would NEVER NEVER get a Blue Heeler 'cause I could not ever ever stand-----having a pet smarter than the owner!!---ME!!!  Smiley Smiley
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Chaz
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« Reply #22 on: September 19, 2007, 02:04:29 PM »

HAAAAAAAA!!!! Cheesy

 Yeah, Tilli taught me a bunch too!!!

   Chaz
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Nissan_DownUnder
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« Reply #23 on: September 20, 2007, 02:49:55 PM »

Hi Chaz

As a kid in WA (Western Australia), I grew up with Cattle dogs & Kelpies.  We always had one or two in the yard.  Since then I have gone on to breed & show Old English Sheepdogs.  I also judge dogs & run one of the local dog training groups (voluntary).  In fact, the reason I am converting a bus is to take our dogs around the country to Dog Shows and to provide a safe place for our kids at the shows.  Because of this I have given a reasonable amount of thought to travelling with dogs.

As mentioned before Cattle dogs are bred to work on the big cattle stations (ranches).  These stations are huge, they are measured by the square mile, some of them are larger than most US states.  The cattle here only see humans at roundup, approximately every 2 years.  It takes a special type of dog to deal with these cattle.  A working cattle dog can be very wary of humans it doesn't know & also very protective.  However, if they are socialised from a young age & their protection instincts channelled they make great pets.  The important thing is socialisation with as many people as possible from as early as possible.  A dog that is travelling should also be socialised with kids, especially if there are no kids already in the coach.  The other thing is to ensure that his protective instincts are channelled to only the coach itself & not the area 100 yds around the coach.  Provided you train this from a puppy & make sure you are the leader of his pack, not the other way around, his protective instincts should be a bonus. 

The first thing to consider when travelling with dogs is the accommodation:
The dog needs a place that is theirs, not just sharing the corridors.  The area should be reasonably quiet, well ventilated & adequate size.  We are raising the main bed & putting a dog area under.  A cattle dog will need an area of at least 30 inches on a side, more if possible. The dog area should be lockable so that the dog can be restricted in this area if necessary.  It makes sense to keep the dog confined when you are driving.  Here it is illegal to drive with an unrestrained dog in the vehicle.  Then you should consider water, either you need to have a spill resistant container available or provide water every hour or two.  The biggest problem with animals in vehicles is heat exhaustion & dehydration.

The accommodation should have a waterproof lining.  We have a rubberised lining about an inch deep.  This prevents any accidents with puppies spreading into the coach.  Also allow that dogs will track dirt into the coach in wet weather, therefore we use vinyl flooring rather than carpets, we will also have a separate door for the dog area.

Dogs need a pitstop about as often as humans & need exercise of at least 15 min at least 2 to 3 times a day.  Cattle dogs tend to be very efficient with their food; far more pets have problems with obesity than with malnutrition.  So on the road where he is getting less exercise, you need to restrict feeding to keep him at a reasonable weight.


I hope this helps your planning.  I have no doubt your pup will be a great addition to your family.

Regards
        Peter
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Peter
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« Reply #24 on: September 20, 2007, 07:49:03 PM »

Peter,

Thank you!  You sound like the guy that first told me about Heelers.  He related your cautions but not your recommendations.  Some breeds NEED to be dominated by Alpha Male and from what you said the Heeler is one.  I know that the Dobe is another.  Fail to do that and you will most likely end up putting the animal down.  As a herder the Heeler should not be a turf protector but more a "family" protector.

Thanks again for your post and good luck with the dog showing enterprise.  Keep us posted, please.

John
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"An uneducated vote is a treasonous act more damaging than any treachery of the battlefield.
The price of apathy towards public affairs is to be ruled by evil men." Plato
“We can easily forgive a child who is afraid of the dark; the real tragedy of life is when men are afraid of the light.”
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« Reply #25 on: September 20, 2007, 09:46:06 PM »

Thanx Peter!!
  After having a Heeler for 17 years, And reading much on them,  all of what you said tends to make sense. ie. their food intake, etc. Tilli was social, but really only cordial. She always liked big males, but nothing else really.
  I got Tilli for all of the qualities they offer and the fact that they are outstanding athletes and Frisbee is a great sport for them. They tend to rank very high in competition and have been known to be national champions overall. They are an absolute blast to watch when they contort their body and catch the Frisbee.
  Thanx for all the ideas and insight on traveling. It's really common sense for the most part, but it's a good refresher from a person who knows such as yourself.
  Any suggestions on the name?? Grin I am considering "Roo". I would like to have a name that has "something" to do with Australia. I know they are jumpers (Tilli at her best could take the Frisbee out of my hand holding it about 7 plus feet in the air. (no exaggeration!!! I'm 5'11" and I would hold it almost straight up.) And she could clear the sides of the pickup truck when she would jump in. (God I loved that dog! Cry)
  So if ya got any neat, cute or unique names, I'm open for them!!!  Grin Slang is cool too. (Mate crossed mind, but it doesn't roll off your tongue. Aussie was another. I even considered Sheila for Tilli in the biginning)

  Thanx a bunch!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
   G'day Mate,
       Chaz

   p.s.Down Under is the #1 spot I want to go when I get to go abroad. I got mates in Botany.  Grin
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« Reply #26 on: November 10, 2007, 07:12:29 AM »

"Roo" is doing very well. What a ball of fire!! He's showing great signs of being a smart dog, but then I work with him everyday. He definitely know Dad (me) is the boss but it's funny how he tries to control Linda.
 We got the house broke thing down pretty good already. Just an ever so occasional mishap if I'm not paying attention. He is just now starting to bark when he wants out. Here is a shot.

  The down side to this, which I haven't mentioned before, was that I got Roo for my father as much as me. But Dad never got to see him. He passed the week before I picked him up. That's why I haven't been on here as much as use to be.

  Anyway................... That's a tough subject and I don't do well with it.

  I'll drop an occasional note about the "little turd bird" on occasion for all you dog lovers. Some more pix too.

   Just me,
      Chaz
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« Reply #27 on: November 10, 2007, 07:49:18 AM »

Chaz,

Beautiful dog man! Sorry to hear about the passing of your father, I lost mine in '95, and I know it's tough.

Hang in there
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« Reply #28 on: November 10, 2007, 07:55:03 AM »

i absolutely think you should not take that dog in your bus.  it would definitely be a bad thing for you to do that.

as a busnut friend, i will help you out by taking that puppy off your hands so that you'll know he's going to a good home.  We're out in the country, plenty of room to run, and he can fly with the Eagles in our bus.

when do you want to run him up here, or for us to pick him up?

 Wink Wink
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Tom
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« Reply #29 on: November 10, 2007, 10:52:23 AM »

Chaz,

I think Tom gets the prize for paying a sincere compliment....albeit left handed. 

Roo is a great looking dog.  Did you keep him intact?  If you don't castrate them before six months you don't modify the aggression or marking tendency.  That is most of the motivation for that surgery.  Sterile?  take care of that with a vasectomy.  I leave my males intact so they will develop physically and I cope with the problems.  Wendy, Merlins wife, is fixed with a "Uterine Hysterectomy".  She still has her ovaries and the testosterone that females get from their ovaries so she is energetic, lean and very well muscled.

You will have a hard time finding a vet that can fix a bitch without gutting her.  The professor of Veteranary Surgery
at Oregon State called me back to say she knew of no one that would do that surgery.  She added that when I found a vet that could he would be an old man.  He is 65!  Seems that this is a popular method in Europe but the US leans to "fast and cheap".  See, and you thought it was just those Md's.

You lucky Dog.  (I'm talking to you both) Roll Eyes

John
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"An uneducated vote is a treasonous act more damaging than any treachery of the battlefield.
The price of apathy towards public affairs is to be ruled by evil men." Plato
“We can easily forgive a child who is afraid of the dark; the real tragedy of life is when men are afraid of the light.”
—Pla
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