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Author Topic: Webasto Installation  (Read 1599 times)
alltech
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« on: September 18, 2007, 04:44:40 AM »

I am installing a webasto in my coach, and I read somewhere that I should run a seperate fuel line from the tank. Has anyone had this experience.

Thx Ross
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gumpy
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« Reply #1 on: September 18, 2007, 05:40:01 AM »

That's what I did. I'll run the generator off that line when I get it installed, too.

craig
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Craig Shepard
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Len Silva
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« Reply #2 on: September 18, 2007, 06:04:39 AM »

Not only a seperate line, but be sure it doesn't extend into the tank as deep as the engine pickup. You don't want the Webasto or generator to run you out of fuel for the engine.

Len
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Jerry Liebler
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« Reply #3 on: September 18, 2007, 06:34:57 AM »

Best practice is a separate supply and return line for each, the generator  and the Webasto.
Also it's good to put the pick up tubes for gen and Webasto about 6" above the tank bottom so you can,t run out of fuel for the engine.  I added the separate supply and returns for the generator and heater to the plate that holds my fuel gauge sender.  Some say you should not use copper tubing for diesel.  I used aluminum.
Regards
Jerry 4107 1120
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DrivingMissLazy
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« Reply #4 on: September 18, 2007, 06:48:49 AM »

Best practice is a separate supply and return line for each, the generator  and the Webasto.
Also it's good to put the pick up tubes for gen and Webasto about 6" above the tank bottom so you can,t run out of fuel for the engine.  I added the separate supply and returns for the generator and heater to the plate that holds my fuel gauge sender.  Some say you should not use copper tubing for diesel.  I used aluminum.
Regards
Jerry 4107 1120

I found that if either the genset or the Webasto ever lost prime, they could not pick up the fuel from the tank. I installed a small elcheapo vibrator type fuel pump in series with the line to these units. I installed a push to operate switch so that it had to remain pushed to operate. I then could release the switch after I got fuel to the units so that it did not have to run all the time they were operating. The built in fuel pumps on the units could suck fuel thru the fuel pump I installed.

My plan was to later install necessary plumbing to prime the 8V82 also, but I never got around to it. That will be a good job for Dave and Brenda.
Richard
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gumpy
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« Reply #5 on: September 18, 2007, 07:40:38 AM »

I used copper. No problems so far.  I think copper is what MCI used from the tank to the engine compartment. Not sure why copper would be problem. First I've ever heard a warning against it.

Also, had no problem with the Webasto pump picking up fuel from the tank. I didn't prime the line originally, just turned on the AquaHot. It picked up just fine.

I did forget to put a valve on the lines, so will have to do that if I should need to ever pull the Aquahot.

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Craig Shepard
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belfert
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« Reply #6 on: September 18, 2007, 09:09:56 AM »

My bus originally came with a Webasto heater for engine and coach heat.  The Webasto was gone when I got the coach.

Anyhow, I used the fuel pickup for the Webasto for my generator.  I'm hoping Dina was smart enough not to run the fuel pickup for the Webasto all the way to the bottom of the tank.

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Chaz
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« Reply #7 on: September 18, 2007, 09:50:10 AM »

When you guys say "fuel pickup", I assume you are talking about a tube from the top down. Does it hurt to solder a side fitting into the tank and take it from there?
  Chaz
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JackConrad
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« Reply #8 on: September 18, 2007, 10:00:30 AM »

Depending on the height of the opening in the side of the tank it would work, but more chance of a leak. Remember that most generators need a return line which usually comes into the top of the tank (no back pressure on the return line).  Jack
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« Reply #9 on: September 18, 2007, 11:18:26 AM »

Remember that most generators need a return line which usually comes into the top of the tank (no back pressure on the return line). 

So does the Webasto.

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Craig Shepard
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Chaz
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« Reply #10 on: September 18, 2007, 11:21:47 AM »

Thanx guys.
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Sam 4106
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« Reply #11 on: September 18, 2007, 12:46:03 PM »

Hi Guys,
Does anyone have any FACTUAL information about why you shouldn't use copper tubing for fuel lines? I had heard that statement against using copper before but have been unable to get any real information.
Thanks, Sam 4106
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donnreeves
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« Reply #12 on: September 18, 2007, 03:10:02 PM »

Back in the late '60's, I worked for a guy who had a bunch of old cable shovels with 2-71's in them. all the fuel lines were copper and cracked every couple of weeks from the vibration. Being young and dumb, all we ever did was put new copper on while getting a bath in fuel. My RTS uses plastic air line for the fuel line, so that is what I used for the Pro-Heat. After 3 years all is well.  Donn
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alltech
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« Reply #13 on: September 18, 2007, 04:46:29 PM »

The reason for tapping off the top of the tank with your fittings is for breakage reasons, if you tap the tank near the bottom and have a line failure there is a better chance that you will drain all your fuel out.

Head pressure on the return line to the tank is actually greater into the top of the tank because you always have the the hydrostatic head pressure of the fuel in the line, if you tap your return near the bottom then you only have the hydrostatic head of the level of fuel in your tank.

Thx everyone for all your responses

Ross
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buswarrior
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« Reply #14 on: September 18, 2007, 05:32:50 PM »

Hello

Save some time and effort. I know of an install in a coach rigged as an emergency support unit that ran two 8K diesel generators and a DBW300 Webasto off the same pick-up and return fuel line. No problems. I ran it for many hours in the grip of winter, with everything going flat out to warm it up and keep us toasty.

If the coach you are designing was to be used by volunteers or employees, I would ABSOLUTELY DEMAND the fuel pick-up was strategically placed some inches higher in the tank, as folks like that WILL run the tank out of fuel.

Seen it done, more than once!

However, for busnuts, I do not believe it is as critical, since the machine is ours, we built it, we pay more attention, we put in all the fuel and perhaps we may be in a situation where we want the choice to have access to every last drop for the generator or Webesto.

I have used them bothways, and chose to extend mine to the bottom.
(Remind me of this post when I mess up!!)

On fuel priming, a regular marine priming bulb for an outboard engine did a great job on that above mentioned install, and was only needed when service work was done on any of them.

Yes, install shut off valves before and after each device, and remember you will have to pull those fuel lines off some day, in the dark and cold, to service something. Consider a little more hardware to rig a way to disconnect more easily?

happy coaching!
buswarrior
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