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Author Topic: Any tips to temporarily seal a window?  (Read 1472 times)
belfert
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« on: September 18, 2007, 06:34:42 PM »

One of my Motion/Peninsula windows needs to be resealed, but I don't have time to pull it and do it properly before I leave in a week.  What type of caulk could I use around the perimeter of the window exterior that wouldn't be impossible to remove later?

It has been raining all day long here and water is coming in pretty good around the window.  Of course, I can't fix it until it dries up tomorrow or this weekend.
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buswarrior
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« Reply #1 on: September 18, 2007, 07:27:46 PM »

hello

Something easy to remove. Some cheap silicone caulk will work fine, just goob it in there, and deal with it later. Or not?

Toothepaste also works in a pinch...

happy coaching!
buswarrior
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« Reply #2 on: September 18, 2007, 07:52:59 PM »

Brian,

Silicone will not stick to anything wet.  I would suggest using a piece of plastic with really good duct tape (100mph tape) already bonded.  Get a dry towl and some help and wipe the paint as you presss the taped plastic on to the buss.  The real good tape will stick to a slightly damp paint/metal.  You need to have some of that tape around as it has a thousand uses.  Keep it in a zip loc bag between uses.

John
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« Reply #3 on: September 18, 2007, 07:57:24 PM »

NAPA has some stuff I use frequently called Window Weld, comes in a caulking gun tube and sets up pretty quick in hot weather.

 Comes in black only and is pricey at $10 or $11 a tube but it works, and better than silicone.  Hard to remove from skin/hands, use  paint thinner/reducer.


Ed
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« Reply #4 on: September 18, 2007, 11:53:53 PM »

Seal 'n Peel.  very cheap a little smelly, made to temporarily seal house windows for winter.   This is not structural/adhesive, but it is sticky and should keep the wind out.   
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DrivingMissLazy
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« Reply #5 on: September 19, 2007, 06:26:05 AM »

Seal 'n Peel.  very cheap a little smelly, made to temporarily seal house windows for winter.   This is not structural/adhesive, but it is sticky and should keep the wind out.   

Try a cake of hand soap first. I used to use that to seal gas tanks on old cars and it goes on a wet surface and sticks. 
Richard
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« Reply #6 on: September 19, 2007, 06:46:03 AM »

You can use Butyl Rubber, comes in a caulking tube or in a squeeze tube.
It never really hardens and can be removed later as needed.

Most hardware stores sell it. Used for sealing around window glass. usually home use.

Dave...
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« Reply #7 on: September 19, 2007, 08:48:27 AM »

Recommend getting GE best gold silicone (at Home Depot in different colors)-just make sure everything is dry, blown out with an air nozzle.  Apply around the window (use WAY less then you think) and smooth with your finger.  As long as the silicone has a thin layer covering the leak, that's all you need.  Too many think that huge globs of silicone will make it seal better.  If it weren't for silicone and plastic ties, my bus would probably fall apart.  Good Luck, TomC
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belfert
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« Reply #8 on: September 19, 2007, 09:00:26 AM »

You can use Butyl Rubber, comes in a caulking tube or in a squeeze tube.
It never really hardens and can be removed later as needed.

Butyl is what I used to seal the windows with originally.  Only one of six windows is leaking and needs to be pulled and resealed.

I was actually going to use leftover butyl from the original install to fix this, but the tube wasn't sealed well and was partially cured.  I don't really like butyl for this since it doesn't cure, but I'll pick up another tube when I go to the store today.

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