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Author Topic: Windows  (Read 1680 times)
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Dave Knight
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« on: September 20, 2007, 07:37:46 PM »

Need more info. Just in ballpark numbers, how many windows has everyone put in their bus and how much did it all cost?
Also, who did you buy from and why? Would you buy the same windows from the same people again or what would you do differently?


-Dave

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« Reply #1 on: September 20, 2007, 08:20:31 PM »

I have 6 single pane sliders that I replaced (76" x 34") with Peninsula glass that has a light tint to it.  Also replaced were the smaller windows behind the front door that were solid, but also changed them to screened sliders.  Changed the drivers window too.  I've been 95% pleased with the windows- the 5% not is that the screens are very cheap-can bend easily, and don't slide very well.  But everything else is great about them.  Also, because of the window rim shape, could not use standard mounting windows. These windows have two sided foam insulating tape with them screwed from the outside.  The difference between the old rattly transit windows and the new are unbelievable.  Now it is much quieter and the windows seal so well that if the windows and roof vents are closed, your ears will pop when you close the door.  So now I keep the bathroom roof vent open some at all times.
If I had to do it again, I would have completely skinned over the entire bus and then cut the windows to size.  Then with the squared off edges of the window cut outs, I could have used double pane windows. I wish they made a window that was a couple of shades darker.  I used gray tinting.  They only had a light tint and an almost limo dark tint.  Something in between would have been good.  Also, the window next to the drivers seat, I did not have tinted-wished I had.  Good Luck, TomC
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« Reply #2 on: September 21, 2007, 02:02:24 AM »

I'm always surprised how many people take out all the original windows and replace them with expensive aftermarket items that are usually smaller and less well made than the OEM equipment. I have designed my coach's interior around retaining all the windows on one side so there is a great view out wherever you are in the bus and whether you are sitting or standing etc. There will be one place where a wardrobe is situated in front of a window, but I intend to partially cover that window with thin aluminium sheet on the outside in the area of the wardrobe - it may sound odd to put a metal sheet on top of the glass, but in fact the windows in my bus are bonded in, and the joints covered in exactly that manner. The aluminium sheet will be painted satin black so that from a distance the windows still appear to run the whole length of the side.



Jeremy
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belfert
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« Reply #3 on: September 21, 2007, 04:31:10 AM »

I paid about $400 each for six Motion/Peninsula windows that are 48"x36" double pane with sliders.

My bus had double pane windows, but nearly every seal was broken so I needed new glass.  I priced out new glass and it was more than the new windows.  There was the extra $600 or so I spent skinning the bus.  My original intent had been to keep the original until the cost came up.  The new ones are also sliders.
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« Reply #4 on: September 21, 2007, 08:12:44 AM »

Jeremy- yes those windows look great, and still will when you get done with the paint job.  But unlike England almost always cool weather, here in the colonies we have warmer weather that is nice to have opening windows for fresh air.  And I can see that NONE of your windows open.  How do you air out the inside if you make a big stinky?  On my bus I have both very large windows and all open.  You might consider the same or else you might be fighting both stale smells and/or moldy/musty odors.   Still like the size and look of your bus-really hate to see you make a big mistake on it.  Good Luck, TomC
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« Reply #5 on: September 21, 2007, 09:28:05 AM »

Dave,

I found all my windows on eBay.

They are all insulated take outs from Monaco or other high end S & S's.

The ones I bought had minor cosmetic defects, but were easily fixed or touched up.

Even before I touched them up you would be hard pressed to find the flaw.

But, those who were buying the coach they came out of, for the price they were paying, wanted NEW ones.

I didn't pay over 125.00 to my door for the largest one.  Be patient and you will find what you want.

One little hint, put your windows up as high as they can go, unless you like bending over to see out.

Thats one of the problems with OEM windows on most of the pre big window coaches.

Check out a few and you will see what I mean.

Cliff
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« Reply #6 on: September 21, 2007, 10:26:59 AM »

Quote
One little hint, put your windows up as high as they can go, unless you like bending over to see out.

Within reason. My eagle windows (peninsula) were installed as high as possible after the roof raise.

You could not sit in a lounge chair of the sofa and see out anything but trees and sky. It was fine if you were standing, but I really tried to spend more time sittin than standin.
Richard
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« Reply #7 on: September 21, 2007, 11:07:22 AM »

Jeremy- yes those windows look great, and still will when you get done with the paint job.  But unlike England almost always cool weather, here in the colonies we have warmer weather that is nice to have opening windows for fresh air.  And I can see that NONE of your windows open.  How do you air out the inside if you make a big stinky?  On my bus I have both very large windows and all open.  You might consider the same or else you might be fighting both stale smells and/or moldy/musty odors.   Still like the size and look of your bus-really hate to see you make a big mistake on it.  Good Luck, TomC

Hi Tom

Your point is well made, and it's true that I am not having to design my bus to deal with the sort of temperatures others are. I kind of figure that if the bus was originally designed to cope with a full load of sweaty passengers on a hot day it should have sufficient ventilation to handle a couple of people using it as a motorhome. Although none of the windows open there are no less than five vents on the roof - there are two large skylights, a powered extractor fan plus two other large openings that opened with an air solenoid and provided the air to the individual vents above each passenger seat (you can see one of these without it's fibreglass cover in the photo). I've also already made plans for a second powered extractor fan in the bathroom / shower. If the worst came to the worst my bus also has a door at each end which could bother be opened to provide a through-draught if things got really sticky.

One thing to mention is that I don't do any sort of cooking that doesn't involve a microwave, and I there won't be any propane in my bus either. It's still possible that it might turn out that I am short of ventilation of course, in which case I suppose I could retrofit opening windows in the future - but I hope I won't have to.

Jeremy
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« Reply #8 on: September 21, 2007, 07:19:15 PM »

All my 4104 original windows are still in place. The windows located at the bathtub/shower, kitchen and refrig positions were simply painted black inside by the PO. It sounds awful but from outside it is not noticable at all since all the windows are pretty dark anyway. It still has the original frosted rest room glass too, way cool!

One can always add dark film to make them even darker if desired.

I surely would not like to have unopenable windows, it is really nice to open them in pleasant weather either parked or underway.
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« Reply #9 on: September 22, 2007, 09:43:43 PM »

I bought dual pane tinted slider windows from Sun-View Industries in Summerland,BC . They seemed to be the fairest price around ($2200 for 7 windows shipped) and they are as good of quality as the one i bought from peninsula glass. I have not got them installed yet but i did open and close them and check the screens all seemed fine.  Hope this helps.           
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« Reply #10 on: September 23, 2007, 08:30:49 AM »

Jeremy,
You are really lucky in a way that the windows in your bus don't open! See the buses that are imported (for commercial use anyway!) to the US are required to be retrofitted with opening windows by US law. Which also leads to trapped water in window channels, which leads to rust! So from that point you are better off! Also I just love your thinking outside the box method of raising the roof on your bus. And as I was looking at the picture (again) of it at the top of this thread, I was thinking wouldn't it be cool if he could make the closure part of the raised roof some sort of opening and closing vents? Just a thought, but then it came before I read about the 5 roof hatches. But still an idea to kick around! Great job so far! Grin  BK  Grin
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« Reply #11 on: September 23, 2007, 11:03:47 AM »

Jeremy,
You are really lucky in a way that the windows in your bus don't open! See the buses that are imported (for commercial use anyway!) to the US are required to be retrofitted with opening windows by US law. Which also leads to trapped water in window channels, which leads to rust! So from that point you are better off! Also I just love your thinking outside the box method of raising the roof on your bus. And as I was looking at the picture (again) of it at the top of this thread, I was thinking wouldn't it be cool if he could make the closure part of the raised roof some sort of opening and closing vents? Just a thought, but then it came before I read about the 5 roof hatches. But still an idea to kick around! Great job so far! Grin  BK  Grin



BK

My mind began following the same route as yours as soon as the roof went up - it made me think of both a Safari Roof on an old Land Rover, and of the Pullman style roof on train carriages. It would be an interesting project to build vents and/or windows into the roof raise, but I need 'yet another' project like I need a hole in my head!

Jeremy

PS. I was thinking about the opening window thing - I am sure I have never seen a coach in the UK with opening windows. Old buses and old train carriages have a small sections of the window that open (see pic of double decker), but again modern buses and trains are totally sealed - I guess it's just that our climate is milder, and modern vehicles have air conditioning anyway.



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« Reply #12 on: September 23, 2007, 11:39:55 AM »

I have read posts about members using Pen. glass that was double pane and replaced the stock glass in MCI Coaches.  Had all the desirable features such as Low E, UV filter, 60% reflect, etc.  Why is this not a more used option?.  All the windows don't need to open so at least some could be done this way. 

Also, all the windows are escape hatches and will open at the bottom and hinge at the top.  Can this be taken advantage of to achieve an openable window?  I would prefer a tip out as it could be left open in the rain.  Comments?  I assume the window frame edges do seal well when closed.

Thanks,

John
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« Reply #13 on: September 23, 2007, 03:15:48 PM »

Quote from: Jeremy
BK

My mind began following the same route as yours as soon as the roof went up - it made me think of both a Safari Roof on an old Land Rover, and of the Pullman style roof on train carriages. It would be an interesting project to build vents and/or windows into the roof raise, but I need 'yet another' project like I need a hole in my head!

Jeremy

Ain't it cool how great minds think alike? LOL!

Quote from: Jeremy
PS. I was thinking about the opening window thing - I am sure I have never seen a coach in the UK with opening windows. Old buses and old train carriages have a small sections of the window that open (see pic of double decker), but again modern buses and trains are totally sealed - I guess it's just that our climate is milder, and modern vehicles have air conditioning anyway.

The reason the US requires the windows for escape exits. Personally I think it's a waste of time, and cost extra $, creates a safety hazard (children playing with window latches), and takes away from the strength of the coaches. There are very few documented cases where the opening windows were a benefit. After all if they are such a benefit why aren't they used in Europe? Resuce workers and fire fighters are trained from day one if a window is in the way, the quickest & easiest way to open it, is to bash it with an axe! So why waste the time making them where they'll open in the first place> Just my 2 cents worth! Grin  BK  Grin
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« Reply #14 on: September 23, 2007, 03:38:02 PM »

The reason the US requires the windows for escape exits. Personally I think it's a waste of time, and cost extra $, creates a safety hazard (children playing with window latches), and takes away from the strength of the coaches. There are very few documented cases where the opening windows were a benefit. After all if they are such a benefit why aren't they used in Europe? Resuce workers and fire fighters are trained from day one if a window is in the way, the quickest & easiest way to open it, is to bash it with an axe! So why waste the time making them where they'll open in the first place> Just my 2 cents worth! Grin  BK  Grin

I presume the reason US buses are thought to need opening windows is because unlike European buses they don't have emergency exit doors.

In fact, my windows all have 'emergency exit' stickers on them as well, despite the fact they don't open. Mounted on the wall next to each window is a little hammer that the passengers are supposed to use to smash the windows! The skylights and the (high) rear window of the bus have emergency exit stickers on as well - presumably smashing the skylights in particular is meant to be a last resort for when the bus is laying on it's side.

Jeremy
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