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Author Topic: 24v vs. 12v  (Read 7075 times)
DrivingMissLazy
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« Reply #15 on: May 22, 2006, 02:58:34 PM »

It's only a distant memory but, it seems to me that I have seen a vintage Bluebird with the front slide out generator.  The exhaust would disconnect when it was pulled out.  There was a funnel like arrangement that would guide the connection as it was pushed back in. This was probably in the seventies.

I can't imagine how it was kept leak tight or kept from seizing up over time.

Len Silva

Len, my exhaust was similar to this. My set was on a pivot and would pivot out about 120 degrees. When it was in the stowed position clamps held it swiveled back in. The two parts of the exhaust (fixed and variable)  mated up and sealed, one against the other.

Similar to how the Model A Ford exhaust pipe clamped to the exhaust manifold, if you know what I mean. Never had an exhaust leak to my knowledge. Probably would not have hurt anything if it had leaked a little bit.
Richard
« Last Edit: May 22, 2006, 03:00:36 PM by Driving MissLazy » Logged

Life should NOT be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in an attractive and well preserved body. But rather to skid in sideways, chocolate in one hand, a good Reisling in the other, body thoroughly used up, totally worn out and screaming:  WOO HOO, what a ride
phil4501
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« Reply #16 on: May 22, 2006, 06:44:05 PM »

I don't mind any hijacking at all, this is just the discussion I was hoping for. On some boards, electrical discussion is akin to religion and politics.

My gen exaust is routed out the back of the rear bay, accross to the other side of the coach and then aimed at the ground,  as was the fashion in 1975. It is aircooled but sound insulated pretty well, with proper baffling for intake and exaust and mounted on biscuits. Not anything to emulate but still a pretty good job for back in the day. I hope to get by with replacing one layer of insulation but will keep the mediocre exauast for now.

I have been told one charger should be plenty, but I really am stuck on the idea of charging with almost the whole 12kw if I choose to do so. I know I could do it with ample's stacking chargers and a stand alone inverter. Outback inverter/chargers can be set up as master and slave, that is alot of inverter. So I figured if I was going to have that kind of inverter capacity, I might as well do it with 24V.
« Last Edit: May 22, 2006, 09:48:44 PM by phil4501 » Logged
DrivingMissLazy
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« Reply #17 on: May 23, 2006, 08:05:12 AM »

I don't mind any hijacking at all, this is just the discussion I was hoping for. On some boards, electrical discussion is akin to religion and politics.

My gen exaust is routed out the back of the rear bay, accross to the other side of the coach and then aimed at the ground,  as was the fashion in 1975. It is aircooled but sound insulated pretty well, with proper baffling for intake and exaust and mounted on biscuits. Not anything to emulate but still a pretty good job for back in the day. I hope to get by with replacing one layer of insulation but will keep the mediocre exauast for now.

I have been told one charger should be plenty, but I really am stuck on the idea of charging with almost the whole 12kw if I choose to do so. I know I could do it with ample's stacking chargers and a stand alone inverter. Outback inverter/chargers can be set up as master and slave, that is alot of inverter. So I figured if I was going to have that kind of inverter capacity, I might as well do it with 24V.


I think you should really look at how much charging you are talking about. 12,000 watts out of the genset would equal about 1,000 amps DC at 12 volts or 500 amps at 24 volts. It is going to take a whole lot of batteries to be able to absorb that much energy, even for a few minutes when the batteries are fully discharged. As soon as they take some charge, the charge rate will drop off quickly or else you will boil the batteries.
Richard
« Last Edit: May 23, 2006, 08:08:15 AM by Driving MissLazy » Logged

Life should NOT be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in an attractive and well preserved body. But rather to skid in sideways, chocolate in one hand, a good Reisling in the other, body thoroughly used up, totally worn out and screaming:  WOO HOO, what a ride
phil4501
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« Reply #18 on: May 23, 2006, 08:34:24 AM »

  The batteries I want to fastcharge are agm and should handle it fine.  "Almost all of 12K" may have been a little bit of dreaming but it is my understanding Lifeline's would take the charge if I could afford both the bank and the chargers. I was going to buy the largest bank I can and the inverter/charger then add the additional chargers over time. I wiould stop adding ac chargers when the system satisfies our needs.
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DrivingMissLazy
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« Reply #19 on: May 23, 2006, 08:51:30 AM »

  The batteries I want to fastcharge are agm and should handle it fine.  "Almost all of 12K" may have been a little bit of dreaming but it is my understanding Lifeline's would take the charge if I could afford both the bank and the chargers. I was going to buy the largest bank I can and the inverter/charger then add the additional chargers over time. I wiould stop adding ac chargers when the system satisfies our needs.

OK, I understand. Just wanted to be sure you understood how much actual power you were talking about.
It has been awhile but as I recall the most charge I could put into an 8D size battery was about 20-30 amps without overheating. I would assurme that would be the maximum charge that any  design battery could take without overheating, but I may be wrong about that.
Richard
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Life should NOT be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in an attractive and well preserved body. But rather to skid in sideways, chocolate in one hand, a good Reisling in the other, body thoroughly used up, totally worn out and screaming:  WOO HOO, what a ride
phil4501
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« Reply #20 on: May 23, 2006, 09:08:17 AM »

Lifeline 8d should be able to take at least 180 amps without overheating. Absorbed glass mat batteries have alot less internal resistance conventional flooded batteries. I am stuck using these expensive monsters because some of them are mounted in the living area, (I will box them just to be extra safe). Rather then spending seveal thousand dollars on a new, super quiet water cooled generator, I will attempt to  run my noisemaker for a shorter amount of time.
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