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Author Topic: Looking for wheels  (Read 3265 times)
Stan
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« Reply #15 on: October 28, 2007, 05:54:14 AM »

Tire shops that cater to trucks have stacks of reject wheels out the back. Get 'heavy' wheels and torch out the 14" center for a spacer. They sell the wheels for scrap metal so return the part you don't need.  I did that on a 4501 tag axle so that I didn't have to run duals.
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kyle4501
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« Reply #16 on: October 28, 2007, 06:26:46 AM »

Yes, they have the cooling slots.

With the position of the axles under the bus being what it is, you need to be careful in reducing the weight carried by the tag, might remove too much weight from the steer axle & make for poor driveability. - So watch the axle weights.

Stan's idea is a good one Grin, when you get them trued on a lathe, they can reduce the thickness too.

But in making the spacers, the thicker they are, the more stress on the studs. You may need to consider replacing your studs with longer ones.  Sad
Seems to cost more, no matter what you do   Sad

On the bright side, it is a PD4501  Grin
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msheldon
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« Reply #17 on: October 29, 2007, 12:15:26 AM »

Yes, they have the cooling slots.

Bloody heck. Mine don't, which means most likely they're not original. Who the heck would replace the original drums with something non-standard?

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But in making the spacers, the thicker they are, the more stress on the studs. You may need to consider replacing your studs with longer ones.  Sad

I only want the spacer to be as thick as needed to get contact, which is around 1/8 - 3/16", probably less than the additional thickness of running aluminum wheels. I might need longer studs, but that's still cheaper than a couple other options.

Cutting the center from an existing wheel is definitely an option, the only issue is that the lug holes will be larger than the actual studs. Still, given how tight the wheels are to the hub, probably not that significant.
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Sojourner
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« Reply #18 on: October 29, 2007, 05:00:26 AM »

msheldon
The old rim that was use in tube type days are non taper but straight cylinder style in 3 or 2 pieces dismountable rim. All tubeless rims are design with taper to remove tire from rim.
You could go to an experience truck brake shop mechanic to get help about changing to a newer version drums and perhaps shoes as well. He can give you parts number that will remedy the problem. Spacer is my last choice but it your money how you want it done. In other word get brake drum that fit tubeless rim. Most class “8” air brake’s drum & shoe are just matter of size in ID & Width, 10 holes (USA) and are design for tubeless rim.

FWIW

Sojourn for Christ, Jerry
« Last Edit: October 29, 2007, 04:13:12 PM by Sojourner » Logged
bobofthenorth
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« Reply #19 on: October 29, 2007, 06:49:02 AM »

I'm with Jerry - last choice would be spacers - you want that rim up tight against the brake drum IMHO.  But I sympathize with your plight.  Trying to find a truck shop employee that knows anything and gives a d@mn is no fun.  I spent all day last Wednesday running to the NAPA truck store in town and listening to the doofus behind the counter say "obsolete" before I finally gave up and called Prevost.  Turned out they were cheaper by about 1/2 and the guy on the other end of the line actually knew what he was talking about.

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msheldon
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« Reply #20 on: October 29, 2007, 09:26:46 AM »

At this point, I'm looking at spacers as a temporary solution, so I can get the bus back on its wheels. In its current state, it's only making short trips from storage to home to various shops as I restore it. The long term solution would be to either find original drums or some other replacement drums that will fit standard wheels.
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Busted Knuckle
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« Reply #21 on: October 29, 2007, 04:03:05 PM »

Quote from: msheldon
Bloody heck. Mine don't, which means most likely they're not original. Who the heck would replace the original drums with something non-standard?

Someone looking to save a buck by using the cheapest part they could find! Not that ANY of us would ever be guilty of that!  LOL!
Grin  BK  Grin
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Busted Knuckle aka Bryce Gaston
KY Lakeside Travel's Busted Knuckle Garage
Huntingdon, TN 12 minutes N of I-40 @ exit 108
www.kylakesidetravel.net

Grin Keep SMILING it makes people wonder what yer up to! Grin (at least thats what momma always told me! Grin)
Sojourner
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« Reply #22 on: October 29, 2007, 04:44:20 PM »

msheldon
For temporary fix…if it about 1/8” gap….then build steel shim or spacer at least 1/4 “ thick should allow extra clearance for drum heat expansion (increase diameter) and rim’s road bump flexing from hitting drum. 
PS…later and when you can, I would replace old “dismountable” rim type drum to have new inter drum’s surface and better yet more fine material. Tubeless rim is safer & easier to replace tire. You are in the long run did the right thing about purchasing tubeless rims.

Wish you well getting it transport to your project area.

Sojourn for Christ, Jerry
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msheldon
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« Reply #23 on: October 29, 2007, 07:10:01 PM »

Just an update.

My mech talked to a couple of GM guys and found that the MCI-9 drums will fit the cruiser. I'm going to go with the spacer plates for the immediate short-term, since replacing the drums on both axles will run me around $3K by the time all is said and done, and right now I'm just running the bus back and forth across town while working on it. But I will be getting the drums replaced some time in the next year or so.

It's always something  Roll Eyes
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Busted Knuckle
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« Reply #24 on: October 31, 2007, 11:14:03 AM »

Quote from: msheldon
I'm going to go with the spacer plates for the immediate short-term, since replacing the drums on both axles will run me around $3K But I will be getting the drums replaced some time in the next year or so.

It's always something  Roll Eyes         

$3K ? Huh Huh, where? I guess I ain't charg'n enough!
Grin  BK  Grin

You could bing it here and still have cash left after paying for fuel $
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Busted Knuckle aka Bryce Gaston
KY Lakeside Travel's Busted Knuckle Garage
Huntingdon, TN 12 minutes N of I-40 @ exit 108
www.kylakesidetravel.net

Grin Keep SMILING it makes people wonder what yer up to! Grin (at least thats what momma always told me! Grin)
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