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Author Topic: Mistakes made when planning your coach  (Read 5022 times)
Reddog
1990 Thomas "Hormone Derange" Gunnison, Colorado
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1990 Thomas Transitliner, 8.3 Cummins/Allison Auto


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« Reply #30 on: December 10, 2007, 04:41:35 PM »

From what I can glean from other conversion sites, lack of planning and lack of funding are the major pitfalls to the converter (especially the first timer). I know my project went overbudget, but I really didn't know what to expect. As an aside, I would also caution the first timer to make sure his (or her) passion does not exceed his (or her) mates (if applicable). Luckily, I only heard "I hate this bus" twice, but my wife is VERY patient with my illnesses.
      Doug Engel, Gunnison CO (-5 now, 2 more feet of snow due by tomorrow)
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"If people don't stare and point as you drive by, keep working."
rcbishop
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« Reply #31 on: December 10, 2007, 07:26:10 PM »

Doug....not so sure I exactly agree with lack of planning or lack of funds, but I understand where you are coming from. 

My experience is that whether owning a home, an automobile, a truck, a snowmobile, boat, airplane or whatever, one always finds something they wish they had or could add, change,  etc, etc.  Seems to me that not all is bad in changing things.  Anticipating that possible change is probably part of the planning process, but in the meantime, one can usually live with a plan until one finds it necessary ( or prudent) to change the plan.
 
As Fast Fred always says, " do it your way"....and if things can be improved for you....or the next guy that owns the coach. it was well worth it.  And, besides, the more one changes things, the more one becomes familiar with the coach....and the easier it is next time. Grin  Huh Lips Sealed .

BTW, I owned and renovated a  property in Gunnison....12th and Ohio.... Great town, Mighty cold for 6 months of the year.  Lived there a year and a half....enuf.  left in 1996 for the sunny south of New Mexico.

RCB.
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Reddog
1990 Thomas "Hormone Derange" Gunnison, Colorado
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« Reply #32 on: December 10, 2007, 08:15:08 PM »

All points well taken, all of these rigs are somewhat of a work in progress. We learn as we go. I don't know if mine will ever be "finished". I pretty much meant not to underestimate the magnitude of the project, it can be a little overwhelming once you get started. Like you said, you get my drift.
  Gunnison is a great place, too bad you left, I can always use some more help on my bus. Come by Gunnison Tire and say hi if you're ever around...I won't look for you till the lilacs bloom.
   Doug Engel, Gunnison,Co.
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scanzel
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« Reply #33 on: December 11, 2007, 11:39:41 AM »

I've had my bus for almost 2 years now, Used it as is when bought for some local camping at RV parks, had a lot of fun. I am now gutting it of everything inside to do the conversion. Just trying to figure out how some of the stuff is installed can be mind bogling. Finally got to the bathroom last night, next comes the holding tank and back tracing all the wiring from the over head racks and lighting. Should have it stripped by January. I would say just gutting it can be a a tough project. Then comes all the things you want to put into it.
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Steve Canzellarini
Berlin, CT
1989 Prevost XL
Cary and Don
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« Reply #34 on: December 11, 2007, 05:45:01 PM »

We bought this mistake.

The fresh water tanks are under the bed.  Not problem with that, if they don't leak.  A small leak, one at the top that only leaks when full or moving, only shows up after, say, five days?  Wet feet!! We ripped the tanks out and put a pan under them with a drain through the floor. They must have been leaking for years without coming out onto the carpet since the floor was rotten under the tanks.  These three tanks were connected to each other with PVC pipe at the top for venting.  They cracked at the top around the fittings.  There isn't any give for movement with pvc.

Don and Cary
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rcbishop
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« Reply #35 on: December 11, 2007, 07:32:38 PM »

Doug... I used to trade at your shop...but don't think you owned it then...or? I remember it was the best gas price in town. North side of Tomichi, right?  Always friendly service and a dog or two to greet you.  I had a Mastiff at the time and she was always ready to greet friends... Smiley  We miss Gunnison in a number of ways, but not the 6 month winters.

Hope you have learned to snag Salmon or two on the Taylor!  Tongue

RCB
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ChuckMC9
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« Reply #36 on: December 12, 2007, 08:37:17 PM »

I just remembered a great quote that came from the skoolie.net forum:

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"As for removal, I already took one piece off one of the walls to get inside the plywood for adding some electrical wiring. (Planning is for sissies)"
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goinnowherefast
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« Reply #37 on: December 13, 2007, 08:58:37 PM »

I have done 2 conversions so far and a 40' 52 GMC 671 and a 35' 63 Crown. number 2 was my last!!! Lots of work, lots of time and never quite done, but there is nothing quite like planning your bus and making it happen your way.

My first conversion mistakes:

Not leaving enough front end open space.

Not careful enough picking strong, light weight as possible building materials.

Adding too many deep cycle batteries to go with a brain, gen wiz to accomodate stackable interface Trace Inverters. The brain would see that the batteries were low and activate the genwiz which would start the generator and charge the batteries while unattended.

I never have used the Brain or Genwiz and didn't stop at my first downhill signal after 5 years of conversion on my maiden voyage. Luckily there was nobody else at the intersection. I was building a real survival bus. When my batteries were charged to 14.2 I could use all of the juice that I wanted, with the exception of the AC's and not recharge for a month. Notice that I am not mentioning just how many batteries were in my rack...
Lets just say I probably could have produced a hydrogen bomb from the gas when once a month when I equalized the batteries.

The 2nd bus was 100% different. All was made with 1 1/8" galvanized square tubing. Very light and strong. One thing I do suggest for anybody doing a conversion is a complete patio on top with a trap door and pull down latter inside. It makes a bus!!! Great view, Private, outside with no bears, scorpions, snakes or any other unwanted visitors.

Sorry probably been watching too much of forensic and cold case files. Anyway I would never have another bus without one, that is way to much wasted space upstairs to not take advantage of all of it...... I've always been infatuated with double decker buses. This was the only way too have it with no thought about height or extra worry about the wind.

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