Bus Conversions dot Com Bulletin Board
November 28, 2014, 11:20:52 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: If you had an Online Subscription: It arrives at least two weeks before the First Class printed magazine.
   Home   Help Forum Rules Search Calendar Login Register BCM Home Page Contact BCM  
Pages: 1 2 3 4 5 [6]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Another E bayer that thinks he has a PD4501 Scenic-Cruiser ....  (Read 10768 times)
jackhartjr
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1328


Beauty is in the eye of the beholder!




Ignore
« Reply #75 on: December 21, 2007, 06:36:46 PM »

There you go Doug...talking about compound curves in the glass!  I bought a compound miter for doing wood working several years ago...messed up a bunch of wood learning that thing!

Of course if I am reading Green Hornets post on bending it...hey, hey, hey, I'll get Kyle, Uncle Ned, and a couple more bus nuts from around here...and practice on 945's rear window!
Jack
Logged

Jack Hart, CDS
1956 GMC PD-4501 #945 (The Mighty SCENICRUISER!)
8V71 Detroit
4 speed Spicer Trannsmission
Hickory, NC, (Where a call to God is a local call!)
Chaz
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1508


4108, 8V71 w/auto .


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #76 on: December 21, 2007, 07:49:34 PM »

By the way, the bus that this thread started out about has 20 hours left. IE. it will be sold tomorrow, 12/22 . Better get ready to get in on it, if ya want it!!
  Chaz

p.s. too bad it's a compound curve. I understand tempered glass can be bent quite a bit. On something like that size, maybe as much as 2-3 inches. That is according to the famous Hot Rod builder, Gene Winfield, whom I just spent some time with. (80 years old and still buildin!!)
Logged

Pix of my bus here: http://s58.photobucket.com/albums/g279/Skulptor/Motor%20Coach/
What I create here:   www.amstudio.us
 
"Imagination is more important than knowledge". Albert Einstein
NewbeeMC9
NewbeeMC9
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1167


1981 MC9 8V71, HT 740




Ignore
« Reply #77 on: December 21, 2007, 08:21:34 PM »

This is lexan thing interesting,  I'm trying to think where else i could use it.  My MCI (more cash inserted) windows are flat. Tongue


guess your high bidder on the bus there kyle,  I know how you like your busses to not use much fuel Wink




For the 4501 creating a need for the upper stuff would probably be hard....But for all the 4104 rear windows, which from what i can tell at least half the conversions have covered with sheet metal, it might be possible to have enough "need"  BTW did I misread or are the 4104,4106 and 4501 rear windows all the same? THis would increase the need even more....maybe..

Instead of covering with metal I would use Lexan, or something similar, for the rear. If yer brave enough to take one out and use it for a bending mold then you can follow these directions. Thickness may be an issue but I think you can make your own seals with the foam tape that truck toppers use, or something else.
Vac Forming

this requires heating your sheet too around 260/280c depending on thickness for it too become rubberised. you can read and make your own Vac former at this link http://http://members.aol.com/GCGassaway/vacuform.htm

bending lexan/plexiglass is rather simple affair

To curve either of these two products
one must invest in a simple homeowners propane torch kit (generally around
$12.00 US). To bend lexan and plexiglass your piece should be clamped
firmly to a strong, stable surface that is preferably indoors. Once you
have clamped the piece begin to heat the panel along the line where you
intend to have it bend. DON'T put the torch too close for too long as it
will cause the plastics to get cloudy or even bubble up. You will know when
the plastic is ready to bend simply by applying pressure to the free end of
your work piece. Large pieces will require the help of a partner who can
apply even pressure along the entire length of the bend while you torch the
plastic keeping a uniform and consistant source of heat applied until you
have achieved the bend or shape your desire.These types of plastics are
also virtually indistructible but they are also a bit more costly. Wall
thicknesses on these products can go up to several inches thick. remember you need too be careful working with HOT and nearly MOLTEN plastics. please get adult supervision if at a young age.

Cutting lexan

Cutting / Drilling:
Tin Snips (Nice clean cuts). depending on thickness!!
Hack saw (don't cut too fast, or the plastic will melt).
"Utility" (or Hobby) Knife and a metal edged ruler.
Do NOT use a scroll saw due to small blade (it typically 'melts' it's way through the plastic). and can cause problems
Can be drilled (best if drilled by hand). i found hand drilling lexan more easy than hispeed drills these too also tend too melt through the plastic and not cut it. Shaping:
Heat.(Softens at about 290-340F or 143-171C)
Use a strip heater (or use a stove element with two heavy tiles to form a thin strip of heat, or your toaster). or heat torch,oven. remember hot plasics need careful hadling with heat proof gloves when i bend lexan. i will warm up the sheet. But the pipe or whatever you use must be clean. the lexan/plexi will take on any slight imperfection on the item used too form the bend. so be sure too use a item that will be use for bending your plastic only and nothing else.

glass is a almost perfect surface for forming over, bowls work well but will need to be thick glass too widthstand the vacum formed when forming in plastic, steel etc etc its a trail and error thing

hope this helps you guys with the crazy ideas for rigs

Logged

It's all fun and games til someone gets hurt. Wink
Green-Hornet
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 300





Ignore
« Reply #78 on: December 22, 2007, 11:24:29 AM »

This thread has taken a life of it's own. Hope it is still going strong long after the auction is over. Grin
Hope the dude that is selling it knows how much entertainment it has brought so many of us!
Logged
Jeremy
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1907


1987 Bedford Plaxton


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #79 on: December 22, 2007, 12:19:36 PM »

p.s. too bad it's a compound curve. I understand tempered glass can be bent quite a bit. On something like that size, maybe as much as 2-3 inches. That is according to the famous Hot Rod builder, Gene Winfield, whom I just spent some time with. (80 years old and still buildin!!)

I'm not sure if tempered glass is the same as toughened glass, but the rear screen on my bus (toughened glass) was a flat sheet bent into place. The bend was way more than 2-3 inches, but it was a big pane of glass (pretty tall and as wide as the bus).

Jeremy
Logged

A shameless plug for my business - visit www.magazineexchange.co.uk for back issue magazines - thousands of titles covering cars, motorbikes, aircraft, railways, boats, modelling etc. You'll find lots of interest, although not much covering American buses sadly.
tekebird
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2263





Ignore
« Reply #80 on: December 22, 2007, 04:39:26 PM »

TADA!!!!!!!!!!!!!

so who is this Case character, who is going to shell out 5600.00
Logged
Stan
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 973




Ignore
« Reply #81 on: December 22, 2007, 05:54:29 PM »

The last thing he bought on ebay was a pair of Indian moccasins so he is ready to own an old GM bus.
Logged
Chaz
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1508


4108, 8V71 w/auto .


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #82 on: December 22, 2007, 08:38:50 PM »

Quote
I'm not sure if tempered glass is the same as toughened glass, but the rear screen on my bus (toughened glass) was a flat sheet bent into place.
It may be Jeremy. Different terms, different side of the pond. Gene said it was pretty cool how far it would bend. Nice to know,
     Chaz
Logged

Pix of my bus here: http://s58.photobucket.com/albums/g279/Skulptor/Motor%20Coach/
What I create here:   www.amstudio.us
 
"Imagination is more important than knowledge". Albert Einstein
Pages: 1 2 3 4 5 [6]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.18 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!