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Author Topic: Where to Mount Propane Tank?  (Read 6178 times)
Gary LaBombard
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« Reply #30 on: December 23, 2007, 10:01:16 AM »

I haven't gotten to this part of my conversion as yet but was wondering if it would be advisible to put one of those gas sensing sensor's in your LP storage locker that should be loud enough to let you know a problem exists??  But then again, can this be a dangerous situation as I believe the sensor is electrically controlled??  Maybe some tips on what we can really do to have a sensor that we can depend upon for this dangerous situation if it occurs.  Maybe our pet Canary can have his cage there??  If he keels over we got problems??  ONLY kidding here!!

A lot of food for thought here and I guarantee you I will think a lot when I get to this point.  But I will also download all this information to refer to and hopefully more will trickle in we can consider.

Thanks Lyndon for this very important thread.

Gary
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Gary
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« Reply #31 on: December 23, 2007, 11:47:59 AM »

But then again, can this be a dangerous situation as I believe the sensor is electrically controlled??  Maybe some tips on what we can really do to have a sensor that we can depend upon for this dangerous situation if it occurs.  Maybe our pet Canary can have his cage there??  If he keels over we got problems?? 

Thanks Lyndon for this very important thread.

Gary

Gary, if you use the canary approach, tie a string to his foot, then run it up through the floor into the coach. Attach it to a small bell and when the bell quits ringing, you know you have a problem!  Grin

Sorry, I tried to stop myself but I have very little will power.... and even less won't power!  Cheesy

Dallas
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JohnEd
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« Reply #32 on: December 23, 2007, 12:52:37 PM »

Keep the alarm/sensor in the coach and mounted LOW and not under the stove.  Follow the instructions.  I can easily imagine that 99% of the propane problems are inside the coach.  A "problem" being somebody "died" or the coach now looks like a motorized "flat bed trailer".

I got one in my bedroom and i am considering putting one in the compartment with a remote alarm in the coach AND outside.

John
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« Reply #33 on: December 23, 2007, 02:47:41 PM »

I'd also recommend a carbon monoxide sensor mounted near and a the same level as your heads when you sleep.  Propane you can smell but CO you can't, and if your heater gets a problem it's easy to get dead...  I have CO sensors but no propane sensors yet... my personal order of perceived importance...
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1962 Crown
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« Reply #34 on: December 23, 2007, 05:14:05 PM »

I'd also recommend a carbon monoxide sensor mounted near and a the same level as your heads when you sleep.  Propane you can smell but CO you can't, and if your heater gets a problem it's easy to get dead...  I have CO sensors but no propane sensors yet... my personal order of perceived importance...

One issue I found with CO detectors is not everyone will be woken by them.  My bus currently has no heat and someone brought a non-vented propane heater.  I didn't like it, but someone left the heater on one night and the CO detector went off about 3 am.  Only three out of the seven people sleeping even woke up.  Those of us awake did immediately shut off the heater and open windows.

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Brian Elfert - 1995 Dina Viaggio 1000 Series 60/B500 - 75% done but usable - Minneapolis, MN
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« Reply #35 on: December 23, 2007, 06:05:04 PM »

One issue I found with CO detectors is not everyone will be woken by them. 

Isn't it the same with smoke detectors?  Put one in each sleeping area to make sure that everybody will wake up.  There's nothing that says one can't have CO and smoke detectors in the bedroom and front area of the coach (and bunk area, if applicable).  I would think that there wouldn't need to be an LP detector in the bedroom, unless there is a gas appliance there.  Some of these detectors will shut off the LP supply if they sense LP. 



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belfert
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« Reply #36 on: December 23, 2007, 06:27:43 PM »

One issue I found with CO detectors is not everyone will be woken by them. 

Isn't it the same with smoke detectors?  Put one in each sleeping area to make sure that everybody will wake up.  There's nothing that says one can't have CO and smoke detectors in the bedroom and front area of the coach (and bunk area, if applicable).  I would think that there wouldn't need to be an LP detector in the bedroom, unless there is a gas appliance there.  Some of these detectors will shut off the LP supply if they sense LP. 

The CO detector is in the sleeping area, yet not everyone woke up.

I have not had previous experience with smoke or co alarms going off while sleeping so nothing to compare to.  At home I have combination CO/smoke alarms that have both alarm and voice announcing fire or carbon monoxide.
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Brian Elfert - 1995 Dina Viaggio 1000 Series 60/B500 - 75% done but usable - Minneapolis, MN
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« Reply #37 on: December 23, 2007, 08:53:51 PM »

Boogie,

I have both and I got the CO sensor first.

Mine are loud.  I also have connections for a remote alarm that will also drive a small 30 amp relay.  When i am done NO ONE WILL SLEEP for at least an hour after this puppy goes of from the adrenilin rush.  Even my neighbors might be concerned...for their own safty.

Oh well, dream on.

John
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« Reply #38 on: December 14, 2011, 02:30:40 PM »

Is it safe to put propane tanks in the compartment with house batteries, inverter, power distro/ breaker box?
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« Reply #39 on: December 14, 2011, 02:46:15 PM »

Sorry for not being High Tec but , we built a wooden cabinet in one of the bays caulked it tight, put 2  2in holes in floor close door and Whala!!!!!!!!!!!!!1  propane gas sinks thats why you mut have the floor vented,  we also use 20lb tanks, because we can replace them on every corner or walmart in the country,  also carry another 20lb for our grill, Becomes a emergency replacement if we need it,  Some tunnels allow, as long as you turn the propane off some tunnels will not allow any propane,  The all have propane sniffers and can tell if you pass them and have propane.  even if it is turned off,   check your route call ahead for tunnel info,
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« Reply #40 on: December 15, 2011, 06:04:53 AM »

mounted in the passenger rear bay next to the tunnel. Vented to the floor. Sensor all over the bus (inside and out) No propane heater. Electric heater and 7 inches of insulation! Cools and heats in 15 minutes or less.

Grant
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Grant Goold
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« Reply #41 on: December 15, 2011, 08:04:58 AM »

eugene john is right about mounting sensors. and it is very easy to buy the $5. automotive relays and have a loud horn attached. I buy a couple dozen at a time for the equipment and street rods i work on. I don't have enough of them but they are needed in both ends of the bus, and the compartments.  and i think you could easily wire several to one horn in the bus instead of having multiple ones..
If one doesn't make a metal division for the propane tank (s) in the compartment, or wherever, i think a plywood wall would be adequate if built to seal from the other areas, and of course proper ventilation.

I have been using small tanks in my compartment, but just got a 120 lb which should last around 3 months at my current use. Also keep a 7 gal one for a spare. Now i just gotta get out in the rain and get to work...
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« Reply #42 on: December 15, 2011, 06:30:23 PM »

There are propane restrictions on the lower levels of the NY bridges and the tunnels under the Hudson. Propane is also prohibited in the two Baltimore Tunnels (Fort McHenry and Baltimore Harbor). At Baltimore you can take the I-695 beltway either direction to get as an alternate. Westbound takes you through rolling hills and Eastbound takes you over the Francis Scott Key Bridge

Pennsysvania TP:
If you are hauling propane and the weight is 100 pounds or under, you are safe to travel without restriction. If, however, you are carrying over 100 pounds of ...
many Federal Dams and tunnels and bridges have restrictions.

The biggest pile of propane bottles I ever saw was at Hoover Dam....
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Dave5Cs
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« Reply #43 on: December 15, 2011, 07:41:25 PM »

We have a 68Lb. frame mount tank with open & close solenoid. I installed a tee in the line in my wet bay  up against the back bulkhead where it is located. Off the tee I ran 2 shutoff ball valves. Off 1, I ran to the floor and through with 1/2" Black Iron pipe into each area ( range-Stove, Refrig, Heater) needed and put another Ball valve within safety shutoff reach on the end with gas 3/8" flex line to each appliance.

Second off the other part of the Tee I ran black iron 1/2" hard pipe down through the bay floor to an elbow and short pipe to where I can attach  my hose with regulator for and when we need a gas bottle attached like now we have a 100lb one hooked up while we are fulltiming It costs us 30 deposit and 90.00 a bottle from the local gas company. You can do the same thing with a 20lber or whatever size you need. Or you can bring one with you and when out just disconnect and go exchange or have filled and you are good to go again. If we go on the road I disconnect 1, 3/8" flare fitting and put a plug in it and switch off that line and open up the other line to on board tank and off we go.

It is vented on the bottom with 3 screened 2"x 20" holes in bay floor.

I put the letters "LPG" in 1" white contrasting stick on style for California rules and so people like Jack and other emergency services can avoid or get to fast and know where the Propane is for their safety.

Also In California (please check in your state) you can not use Copper lines as propane supplies, because they have found that they corrode because of the mercaptan which they put in as a safety smell chemical so you know when there is a leak. Also need to use flex lines to the appliances that are about the floor line.

Dave
« Last Edit: December 15, 2011, 08:06:07 PM by Dave5Cs » Logged

sledhead
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« Reply #44 on: December 18, 2011, 07:23:32 AM »

 hi Don         when I built my 102c3 in 2005 in Ontario Canada I had to use 2@ 30 lbs tanks because the Rv propane code was lighter then permanent mounted tanks and easer to fill 1 at a time. at the time in order to convert bus to a rv on my vehlicle onwership and to get insurance .rv was inspected by tssa ( nat.gas,propane gov. inspection ),and appraised by a lic.appraisal service. I installed the 2 tanks on a set of rollers in a sealed box vented at top with 2@ 3" ss vents to outside in  1st bay door and vent through floor  of box to below bus. attached to box was a separate box with a auto switch over reg. and a main shut off .reg was vented through the bus floor .  all lines were 3/8 yellow propane line with T's run up through floor from basement to EACH appl. fr,cook top, water heater , 12,000 btu furance. bus has in floor pex heat off motor or pro heat. installed the 12,000 btu fur. for added heat when boon docking in 2009. on the regulator at the shut off is a tag from tssa with date, specs,techs name, lic no.which can not be removed .   hope this helps as it had to be done for dot,insurance                      Dave
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1990 mci 102c  6v92 ta ht740  kit,living room slide . home base huntsville ontario canada
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