Bus Conversions dot Com Bulletin Board
July 28, 2014, 09:39:09 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: If you had an E-Mag Subscription: It arrives at least two weeks before the First Class printed magazine.
   Home   Help Forum Rules Search Calendar Login Register BCM Home Page Contact BCM  
Pages: [1] 2  All   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Tool for shaving spray foam insulation  (Read 3625 times)
Tenor
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 991



WWW

Ignore
« on: January 01, 2008, 12:12:57 PM »

Found this at Lowe's and it does a nice job.  It's a hand Saw.  What makes it different is that it cuts on the pull stroke instead of the push.  The blade is very flexible for getting into curves.  This has a long straight handle that can be gripped with 2 hands. The blade can be set at different angles and is double edged with an aggressive cut and a fine cut.  The blade is 10 inches long. The job of shaving this stuff down is still difficult, don't let anyone fool you.  Here are the details

Vaughan Bear Saw
Lowe's
$19.98 US.
Logged

Glenn Williams
Lansing, MI
www.threemenandatenor.com
1968 MCI 7 Ser. No. 7476 Unit No. 10056
8v71
4 speed Spicer
TomCat
It's 4:20 somewhere...
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 411



WWW

Ignore
« Reply #1 on: January 01, 2008, 01:21:52 PM »

Glenn,

I wish I had needed a tool such as you describe, but I went a different way with my coach insulation.

It seems like in the last 3-4 months there was an episode of Dirty Jobs, where Mike Rowe worked with a team that did spray hot foam insulation in homes. When it came time to shave it down to stud depth, one of the insulation crew pulled out a homemade device for that purpose. It resembled a large beaterbar on a floor sweeper head, except it was obviously exposed. The part that did the shaving was a series of short steel brushes on a 2-3 foot wide roller, driven by a belt run off an electric motor.

Probably wouldn't be worth making one unless you were doing insulation, but it made a bad job really fast and easy.

Hope that helps.

Jay
87 SaftLiner
Logged

On The High Plains of Colorado
belfert
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5395




Ignore
« Reply #2 on: January 01, 2008, 01:27:52 PM »

The insulation in the Dirty Jobs episode was spray cellulose, not foam.  I don't know if their tool would work too well on foam.

Off topic a bit, I was suprised watching Dirty Jobs that houses are still built with 2x4 walls.  2x6 walls have been code required for years here in Minnesota for extra insulation.  Minnesotans spend a fair bit on heat, but I know folks in Texas who spend more on A/C than I do on heat and A/C combined.

Logged

Brian Elfert - 1995 Dina Viaggio 1000 Series 60/B500 - 75% done but usable - Minneapolis, MN
JohnEd
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 4571




Ignore
« Reply #3 on: January 01, 2008, 01:33:34 PM »

DON"T BREATH THAT DUST!  The little paper filter that covers your mouth and nose and is secured with the rubber band isn't enough.  Get a mask with replaceable filters from a paint suppy store.  The horror story I have heard from a friend would motivate you.  That good mask is about $30 and mine is still good after 10 years.

Have you tried an electric knife for carving?  That goes through soft foam like butter.

Best of luck,

John
Logged

"An uneducated vote is a treasonous act more damaging than any treachery of the battlefield.
The price of apathy towards public affairs is to be ruled by evil men." Plato
“We can easily forgive a child who is afraid of the dark; the real tragedy of life is when men are afraid of the light.”
—Pla
Melbo
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1065


MC8 under construction




Ignore
« Reply #4 on: January 01, 2008, 02:11:23 PM »

Don't only protect your breathing but also your eyes.

Those little pieces of foam are really hard on your eyeballs when they get in there.

They seem to sneak in when you think you are done and getting cleaned up.

A good vacuum is VERY important to cleaning up -- I burned one up.

YMMV

Melbo
Logged

If it won't go FORCE it ---- if it breaks it needed to be replaced anyway
Albuquerque, NM   MC8 L10 Cummins ZF
wrench
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 166





Ignore
« Reply #5 on: January 01, 2008, 02:27:33 PM »

  Replace the spiral brush on a vacuum carpet cleaner with a blade, & hook to a large shop vac, no dust, no particule, no cleaning, one step operation. In any case use of a mask is safe.
            wrench
Logged
Tenor
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 991



WWW

Ignore
« Reply #6 on: January 01, 2008, 02:28:34 PM »

Again guys, thanks for the safety tips.  I am using a respirator with replaceable cartridges that I have used for painting.  Does a great job.  Can't even smell the stuff.  I am also wearing goggles to cover my glasses.  On a trial job with the saw, I realized right away that this would be a mess so I prepared for it.  I'm almost done.  I just have to keep stopping to stretch out my neck.  I suppose tall people (anyone over 5feet) don't need ladders and the job goes quicker?  LOL!
Logged

Glenn Williams
Lansing, MI
www.threemenandatenor.com
1968 MCI 7 Ser. No. 7476 Unit No. 10056
8v71
4 speed Spicer
Dreamscape
Guest

« Reply #7 on: January 01, 2008, 02:39:50 PM »

Tenor,

Take lots of pictures as you go. It's always good for referance later, and of course share with us.

Good Luck,

Paul
Logged
belfert
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5395




Ignore
« Reply #8 on: January 01, 2008, 03:50:46 PM »

I would suggest a Goretex filter for your shop vac if you are doing this.  The paper filters might not filter as well, plus they will be harder to clean when they get dirty.  Dirt and dust just falls off the Goretex filters when you remove them to clean them up.

Yes, the Goretex filters are spendy at $30, but your health is worth it since less stuff will get through the filter.  My experience so far is that Goretex filters should last many times longer than a regular filter.

The Goretex filters for Ridgid and Sears shop vacs are at Home Depot.  No idea if they make them for the Shop Vac brand.
Logged

Brian Elfert - 1995 Dina Viaggio 1000 Series 60/B500 - 75% done but usable - Minneapolis, MN
boogiethecat
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 633



WWW

Ignore
« Reply #9 on: January 01, 2008, 05:14:15 PM »

I took a 3' piece of bandsaw blade and welded the ends to an arch made of 1" steel tubing. Somewhat like a tree saw but with the blade rotated 90 degrees from where it normally is .
It made a really nice way to do flush cuts...
But the best tool I made was simple, nasty, and extremely effective... three 1/4-20 bolts and an old grinding disc.  It is like cutting butter with a hot knife.  Just be CAREFUL if you make one of these- I can't imagine that they are the safest tool in the world to use... 
Logged

1962 Crown
San Diego, Ca
JohnEd
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 4571




Ignore
« Reply #10 on: January 01, 2008, 09:43:19 PM »

Belfert,

I have a 13 gallon shop vac that sucks.  I mean...really sucks.  I installed one of those spendy waskable filters and it works really well.  The cleaning is not so enjoyable.  I have now installed paper bag filters that I throw away when full and the vac seems to suck right up to the full bag point and i am vacing drywall dust.  Thats fine!  I keep my spare bags in the vac folded behind the filter I am using.

John
Logged

"An uneducated vote is a treasonous act more damaging than any treachery of the battlefield.
The price of apathy towards public affairs is to be ruled by evil men." Plato
“We can easily forgive a child who is afraid of the dark; the real tragedy of life is when men are afraid of the light.”
—Pla
belfert
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5395




Ignore
« Reply #11 on: January 02, 2008, 03:00:15 AM »

Belfert,

I have a 13 gallon shop vac that sucks.  I mean...really sucks.  I installed one of those spendy waskable filters and it works really well.  The cleaning is not so enjoyable.  I have now installed paper bag filters that I throw away when full and the vac seems to suck right up to the full bag point and i am vacing drywall dust.  Thats fine!  I keep my spare bags in the vac folded behind the filter I am using.

While the Goretex filter may be washable I have never done so.  I generally just take it outside and bang it on the driveway and the dust just falls right, even drywall dust.  I like the Goretex filter for that reason, plus it contains more fine dust.
Logged

Brian Elfert - 1995 Dina Viaggio 1000 Series 60/B500 - 75% done but usable - Minneapolis, MN
wvanative
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 273




Ignore
« Reply #12 on: January 02, 2008, 03:37:14 AM »

Hey guys, I saved this picture of a home made tool for insulation work that one of the guys made.

Belfert I sent you an email this week about heating your bus did you get it???

WVaNative
Logged

Dean Hamilton Villa Grove, IL East Central IL. Near Champaign
Still Dreaming and planning
Green-Hornet
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 300





Ignore
« Reply #13 on: January 02, 2008, 08:03:51 AM »

I do not know if anyone has tried this before but several years ago I was into R/C airplanes. Some of them used foam wings. Cutting those wings was done with a bow and "Hot wire" made from a transformer a household dimmer switch and parts from Radio Shack. Makes super clean cuts with very little mess. The bow can be made to fit between the wall studs and it will accomidate any curves you encounter.
Here is a pic showing the bow ready to cut a wing.

and a link to the site that shows how to make one.http://www.charlesriverrc.org/articles_foam_vac.htm
Logged
Chaz
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1508


4108, 8V71 w/auto .


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #14 on: January 02, 2008, 09:46:44 AM »

When I did my house, I rented a tool that looked like the rotory blades on an OLD hand push mower. It had a handle on either end. Worked GREAT!! Lots of little slivers, but not too much dust.
 I then used a 9" sanding disc, 36 grit, on a 4 1/2" right angle grinder for the outside of my skylight boxes. Worked REEEEEALLY fast (be careful) but TONS of dust!!! But I was outside and protected.
 But if you can find the rotory blade tool, that baby is the ticket.

    Chaz
Logged

Pix of my bus here: http://s58.photobucket.com/albums/g279/Skulptor/Motor%20Coach/
What I create here:   www.amstudio.us
 
"Imagination is more important than knowledge". Albert Einstein
Pages: [1] 2  All   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.18 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!