Bus Conversions dot Com Bulletin Board
August 20, 2014, 03:39:10 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: 500 Members as of May 5th, 2006.  Smiley  3,499 Members as of October 21, 2012 Cheesy

   Home   Help Forum Rules Search Calendar Login Register BCM Home Page Contact BCM  
Pages: 1 2 3 [All]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Need opinion...is there a need out there for cabinetmaking skills?  (Read 3934 times)
Phil H / Chicago
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 59





Ignore
« on: January 30, 2008, 08:10:20 PM »

I have been thinking about trying to find a building in the Chicago/Rockford area so I can have a place to store and work on my rv (and hopefully bus soon), but just can't justify the cost, unless....I were to try to start a little conversion shop that focused on highend cabinet/woodwork. Being all I really know well, I would stick to that. I figured if I did a little work to help offset the cost of the building, well then maybe it would be ok. What's the opinion out there?

Is there anyone in this area that might know of a building? Maybe there is someone out there that might want some building space to share?

Thanks, Phil
Logged
grantgoold
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1037





Ignore
« Reply #1 on: January 30, 2008, 09:15:21 PM »

I am in California and would love to have someone who is interested in custom cabinets for my bus conversion. You may want to think about both "highend" and economy products. Many bus converters are on budgets and yet looking for some custom work.

If you move to California or closer, let me know and I will be your first West Coast customer.

Grant
Logged

Grant Goold
1984 MCI 9
Way in Over My Head!
Citrus Heights, California
cody
Guest

« Reply #2 on: January 30, 2008, 09:32:58 PM »

I find that there is always a need for someone that can do a good job on the woodworking end of a conversion.  It's very hard for any one person to wear all the hats necessary to do a reasonably well done conversion, between the mechanical, electrical, plumbing, painting and add into all that the woodworking and cabinetry and you'd have a very well rounded person, unfortunately that is rarely the case., The beauty of this board is all those qualities can be found over the many members here and everyone freely shares their expertise/knowledge.  I can appreciate the fit and finish of a cabinet that has been constructed by someone that has a good grasp of what they are doing.  I make a little sawdust now and then and can relate to what all goes into it, it's far more involved than some realize.
Logged
luvrbus
Guest

« Reply #3 on: January 31, 2008, 04:40:23 AM »

Phil and Cody, I like Grant live in the west and there is a guy here that for years has been building custom cabinets in conversions he comes to your bus with all his wood working equipment stays till the work is completed and is always booked in advance.May be a option for you if travel is in the plans
Logged
Stan
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 973




Ignore
« Reply #4 on: January 31, 2008, 05:22:10 AM »

The key to doing quality work in a bus conversion is experience. I had a boat carpenter do the cabinet work in my first bus. When I approached him, he said that he had never done a bus, but a bus was just a boat upside down. His methods were completely different from the house cabinet maker. First a pattern on cardboard, transferred to hardboard that was fitted in place and then the hardboard used as a pattern for the hardwood.  A lot of the cabinets require a pattern for both the vertical and horizontal. Even with all his experience, he under estimated the price and there was a cost over run.

In a cheap conversion, the individual can take IKEA cabinets and chop the corners off and cover the gaps with moldings. Buyers paying  for cabinet maker skills will not accept that, and you can't make a living working for day labor wages as a helper.

My suggestion would be to practice on your own bus and then use it as a display to show what you can do. Remember that there is no engineered material in bus cabinets, just plywood and solid wood.

Logged
JackConrad
Orange Blossom Special II
Global Moderator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 4447


73' MC-8 8V71/HT740 Southwest Florida


WWW
« Reply #5 on: January 31, 2008, 05:52:17 AM »

   We made all the cabinets and doors in our bus fromfurniture grade red oak plywood and solid red oak lumber. We purchased about 600 bd. ft. of 5/4 r.s. kiln dried oak. This was milled down to the dimensional lumber sizes we needed.  I am fortunate that when I was growing up, my father had a cabinet workshop at our house, so I started learning cabinet making at a young age.
   As was mentioned, building quality cabinets is not a fast project. Milling pieces, sanding, dry fitting, sanding, gluing, sanding, staining and finishing takes a lot ot time. Did i mention sanding?
   The other important factor is having the proper tools. It would be extremely difficult to build quality cabinets and doors with a portable circular saw and a hand held router. My cabinet shop is pretty well equipped and it still takes a lot of time. Several fellow busnuts have stayed at our place, some used my shop, to build their cabinets. Taking their time, most have made some beautiful cabinets.  Jack
   
Logged

Growing Older Is Mandatory, Growing Up Is Optional
Arcadia, Florida, When we are home
http://s682.photobucket.com/albums/vv186/OBS-JC/
Tenor
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 991



WWW

Ignore
« Reply #6 on: January 31, 2008, 06:02:37 AM »

My father-in-law is a cabinet maker.  Last summer I made doors for the old bus, and it was the first time I had ever cut anything that needed to look good.  This year, he found a great deal on a load of pitchy pine at 1.20/ft in 12" sections and we will use that to build almost everything.  We'll use the wet sections for walls behind tongue and groove paneling (pine as well) and use the good stuff for cabinetry.  We are doing things a bit differently.  Instead of using plywood for bulkheads and walls, we are going to do panel construction for that.  It's just as strong dimensionally, but lighter.
Logged

Glenn Williams
Lansing, MI
www.threemenandatenor.com
1968 MCI 7 Ser. No. 7476 Unit No. 10056
8v71
4 speed Spicer
Phil H / Chicago
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 59





Ignore
« Reply #7 on: January 31, 2008, 06:14:17 AM »

You guys are right....there are cabinetmakers and then there are "cabinetmakers". It's like any industry, you usually get what you pay for. I did a set of kitchen cabinets for a MCI about three years ago, a highend conversion and the guy wanted it to look nice. I went in and made templates of the floor/wall/ceiling, went back to the shop, fabricated the product, hauled it to his bus and installed it.....fit like a glove. If you plan first and take all the guess work out of it, shouldn't be a problem. He was happy so I was happy. If I remember right, he spent about $12,000 with me. He decided to sell his bus before we got back to the bathroom and bedroom. The guy who bought the bus finished the project.....and that's all I'm gonna say bout that.

When people come to me about doing their home I usually ask them up front, do you want something nice, good materials and done right.....or do you want something to hold up your countertop? I can help with the first.

I started my first bus conversion about seven years ago with the intention of doing a very highend interior, mostly for myself but if I liked the process was going to use it as a showroom and get into the business. But things did not go as planned, the first shell I purchased turned out to be such a problem, full of rust (my igorance), the owner who sold it to me did not even own it, he fabricated a false title and then filed bankruptcy.....on and on went the problems until I just gave up and sold/trashed the shell. I am just now looking at trying again. I just want to take my time and find the right 45' shell this time. For the time being I guess I will just enjoy my rv.

Thanks, Phil
Logged
JackConrad
Orange Blossom Special II
Global Moderator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 4447


73' MC-8 8V71/HT740 Southwest Florida


WWW
« Reply #8 on: January 31, 2008, 06:16:19 AM »

Tenor,
  Probably not as important in a bus as a home, but check the moisture content of the lumber before making panels. If the lumber was not kiln dried, you may have shrinkage issues. Several years ago I made a dining room table from white oak and teak that was not kiln dried but had been air drying for 20-25 years. Everything was fine until we turned on the AC in our new house. After a few months, we had a gap open up in the table top between 2 of the boards that shrunk when the humidity level in the house dropped.  Jack
Logged

Growing Older Is Mandatory, Growing Up Is Optional
Arcadia, Florida, When we are home
http://s682.photobucket.com/albums/vv186/OBS-JC/
Tenor
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 991



WWW

Ignore
« Reply #9 on: January 31, 2008, 06:44:55 AM »

Thanks for the warning Jack.  Fortuantly, this is kiln dried.  And, if it moves, (since we are going for the rustic cabin look), I'm not gonna cry too hard. 
Logged

Glenn Williams
Lansing, MI
www.threemenandatenor.com
1968 MCI 7 Ser. No. 7476 Unit No. 10056
8v71
4 speed Spicer
cody
Guest

« Reply #10 on: January 31, 2008, 09:33:02 AM »

Your absolutely right on cabinets in a bus being an entirely different animal from those in a house, your dealing with an entirely different set of variables. You first have to find the imaginary vertical and horizontal to base your templates off and then deal with the curvature of the walls, unless you live in california your house generally doesn't move much lol, a coach does and what looks good now may take on a different appearance down the road. I've been making sawdust for many years and some have even dared to call it cabinetry, I even had the nerve to post a couple of pics of some of my work here on the board and I think that most that have seen what I do have felt that it was better than what they normally would see at walmart, based on that, I would think a good cabinet maker would find plenty of work with conversions if he wanted to do it.
Logged
JimC
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 201




Ignore
« Reply #11 on: January 31, 2008, 09:04:30 PM »

Cody gets the understatement of the year award for his statement about

"better than the ones you would see at Wall Mart".

Attached is a picture of his cabinetry skills.
JIm
Logged

4106 - 8-71/730
Oconomowoc, Wisconsin
between Milwaukee & Madison
wvanative
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 273




Ignore
« Reply #12 on: February 03, 2008, 05:45:52 PM »

Cody, if that picture above is your work, it is great. I hope when my time comes that I'll be able to do as nice as you have. Very nice work

WVaNative
Logged

Dean Hamilton Villa Grove, IL East Central IL. Near Champaign
Still Dreaming and planning
cody
Guest

« Reply #13 on: February 03, 2008, 06:40:28 PM »

WVNative, Thanks, thats my work, I enjoy making sawdust.  Since we've been fulltiming I've had the pleasure of working on several coaches and each one is a challenge and a pleasure, I enjoy it and carry a few basic tools with me, it's a hobby of mine. Here is a another pic, this is the dinette I built. The next one shows a detail of one of the dinette bases, the last one is of the refrigerator after I built it in with the microwave built in above it, the refrigerator has a temperature sensitive switch that turns on a fan and exhausts the cabinet heat if it reaches a certain point.
Logged
JimC
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 201




Ignore
« Reply #14 on: February 03, 2008, 08:00:41 PM »

Cody,
You will have to give me the specifics of your set up with the temp switch and what fan you used.
The fridge went out on my bus in Phoenix (after building it in) and I have to make another mount for it and the micro/convection oven above it. The heat is what I am worried about, and I have thought about how to do what you have done..
Jim
Logged

4106 - 8-71/730
Oconomowoc, Wisconsin
between Milwaukee & Madison
cody
Guest

« Reply #15 on: February 03, 2008, 08:27:14 PM »

Jim, I'm not sure I understand it myself lol, I built some cabinets for a friend that is a heating and cooling guy and while I was putting my dinette together he was tinkering with the temp sensing system, it was his brainstorm lol.  The way he described it to me was it is a thermostat hooked up to a relay, when the temp increases, it trips the relay that activates a squirrel cage type blower that exhausts air thru vents above the refigerator, there is also an intake vent on the bottom back on the side for air flow, so far the air flow is enough to provide cooling, I've only seen the blower kick in once.  I'm sure nick could explain it much better than me, thats his area of expertise.  I'm a sawdust kind of guy, heating and cooling is pretty much a mystery to me.
Logged
NJT5047
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1942





Ignore
« Reply #16 on: February 03, 2008, 08:43:14 PM »

Phil, I've got a building...but it's near Charlotte, NC.  Been thinking about another one too.  I'd like to have a building with a pit.   Working on a bus without a pit is tedious. 
I got something else too... I have a "practice" bus that you can use as a sample.   Free.  No charge at all.   I'll be happy to show your work all around.   Smiley
Looking at Cody's pix (and almost everyone elses interior?!  Ace, Jack's, JJRs and Nick's buses comes to mind) reinforces the fact that Lowes finest don't cut it.  Well, their finest might look nice.  Their cheapest doesn't. 
You're gonna find that the overhead near the big cities is too expensive.  Come'on down!  You'll like the area.  Halfway between the north and the South.
We've been thinking about a 102" bus.  If it wasn't for all the woodwork!  Wonder if that 102C3 with the S60 that's listed in BC Mag has sold yet?  Buses are definitely getting less expensive.   I be shopping!   Cool
What might one expect to pay for just the cabinet work on a nice conversion? 
JR








     
Logged

JR Lynch , Charlotte, NC
87 MC9, 6V92TA DDEC, HT748R ATEC

"Every government interference in the economy consists of giving an unearned benefit, extorted by force, to some men at the expense of others.”

Ayn Rand
cody
Guest

« Reply #17 on: February 03, 2008, 08:51:45 PM »

To get back to the original poster, Phil, as you can see there is a demand for skills of all sorts here on the board, often buses are owned by busnuts that are very mechanically inclined, while these people can overhaul a detroit in their sleep not all would trust their cabinetry skills to the level of scrutiny that comes while showing off the works of art we're all trying to create.  In my opinion the key to making it work would be to closely work with the individual and to make sure the bus reflects their personality and the vision of what they are trying to create.  As you know, nothing is standard in a bus and each one has it's own level of complexity, these buses are like family members and a level of craftmanship is expected, anyone that can deliver that level is going to be a very busy person, making a living doing it may be another thing but the work is certainly out there for the right person.
Logged
Nick Badame Refrig/ACC
1989, MCI 102C3, 8V92T, HT740, 06' conversion FMCA# F-27317-S "Wife- 1969 Italian/German Style"
Global Moderator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 4860


Nick & Michelle Badame


WWW
« Reply #18 on: February 04, 2008, 05:20:37 AM »

What might one expect to pay for just the cabinet work on a nice conversion? 
JR


One Million Dollars... Grin Grin

Nick-
« Last Edit: February 04, 2008, 10:35:28 AM by Nick Badame Refrig. Co. » Logged

Whatever it takes!-GITIT DONE! 
Commercial Refrigeration- Ice machines- Heating & Air/ Atlantic Custom Coach Inc.
Master Mason- Cannon Lodge #104
https://www.facebook.com/atlanticcustomcoach
www.atlanticcustomcoach.com
Stan
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 973




Ignore
« Reply #19 on: February 04, 2008, 07:28:06 AM »

The question was about cabinet work - NOT AIR CONDITIONING Smiley
Logged
NJT5047
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1942





Ignore
« Reply #20 on: February 04, 2008, 07:49:15 AM »

What might one expect to pay for just the cabinet work on a nice conversion? 
JR


One Million Dollars... Grin Grin

Nick-

Now I remember why Lowe's Cheap Chic appealed to me.    Wink
JR


Logged

JR Lynch , Charlotte, NC
87 MC9, 6V92TA DDEC, HT748R ATEC

"Every government interference in the economy consists of giving an unearned benefit, extorted by force, to some men at the expense of others.”

Ayn Rand
H3Jim
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1398


1995 Prevost H3-41, series 60, B500 Allison




Ignore
« Reply #21 on: February 04, 2008, 07:53:43 AM »

From the picture below of Cody's cabinets, Wow! he won't be caught short on electrical outlets.  That a whole row of them above the coutner top!
Logged

Jim Stewart
El Cajon, Ca.  (San Diego area)

Travel is more than the seeing of sights, it is a change that goes on, deep  and permanent, in the ideas of living.
cody
Guest

« Reply #22 on: February 04, 2008, 10:13:00 AM »

I'm just not a big fan of extension cords, lol, I've got 14 outlets in just the living room and kitchen area.  The advantage is we can move things like a small fan around if we need too, or the toaster can sit anywhere on the counter top and still reach an outlet.  My wife says I overkill everything I do, I'm not quite sure what she is talking about tho lol. She might be talking about the french polish finish on my oak tool box, I'm not sure, she means well but she just doesn't understand that I have no life lol and too much time on my hands.  She even got upset when I put a new finish on an oak toilet seat she bought, it just didn't look the way I wanted it to, difficult to please them sometimes I guess.
Logged
Nick Badame Refrig/ACC
1989, MCI 102C3, 8V92T, HT740, 06' conversion FMCA# F-27317-S "Wife- 1969 Italian/German Style"
Global Moderator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 4860


Nick & Michelle Badame


WWW
« Reply #23 on: February 04, 2008, 10:31:00 AM »

The question was about cabinet work - NOT AIR CONDITIONING Smiley

I Know.. but, it looks like a million Bucks. Why not call it that.

All right,    100 Million Dollars
Nick-
« Last Edit: February 04, 2008, 10:37:12 AM by Nick Badame Refrig. Co. » Logged

Whatever it takes!-GITIT DONE! 
Commercial Refrigeration- Ice machines- Heating & Air/ Atlantic Custom Coach Inc.
Master Mason- Cannon Lodge #104
https://www.facebook.com/atlanticcustomcoach
www.atlanticcustomcoach.com
skipn
Guest

« Reply #24 on: February 04, 2008, 10:47:19 AM »

Cody,

   "new finish on an oak toilet seat she bought"

   Just don't try one of my old tricks  Smiley

 I went through a phase where I used Armour All on all the high gloss wood finishes...
 One spur of the moment great idea I had was to use Armour All on the wood floors.

 Turned out a real problem (for me) Maria came home took her shoes off and in her
 nylon stocking tried to walk across the floor.  Needless to say down she went
 and slid into the kitchen.   2 solid days stripping the floor and re waxing with
 an appropriate floor wax.  Grin


   Skip
Logged
cody
Guest

« Reply #25 on: February 04, 2008, 10:56:41 AM »

"Slid into the kitchen", yep I could see where that could cause a problem for sure lol. I suppose it would have been a bad thing to ask her to make you a sandwich while she was in there?  That would be the suicidal thought for the day lol.
Logged
skipn
Guest

« Reply #26 on: February 04, 2008, 11:08:49 AM »


 The only thing that saved me was I had tennis shoes on and she couldn't
 get enough traction to chase me. We can laugh about it now but she
 had a very big bruise

  Since then I stain, Murphy soap, and tree wax no more getting inventive.
  So when it came time to pick out a flooring for the bus.....NO hardwood.

   To bad I can get a real polished shine look Smiley
   
    Skip
Logged
JohnEd
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 4571




Ignore
« Reply #27 on: February 04, 2008, 02:51:03 PM »

Cody,

Have you put up pics of your interior to date?  I would REALLY like to see more of the work you have done.  Is that real parket flooring?

You will have a real show stopper when done or is it done? 

Thanks,

John
Logged

"An uneducated vote is a treasonous act more damaging than any treachery of the battlefield.
The price of apathy towards public affairs is to be ruled by evil men." Plato
“We can easily forgive a child who is afraid of the dark; the real tragedy of life is when men are afraid of the light.”
—Pla
cody
Guest

« Reply #28 on: February 04, 2008, 03:29:11 PM »

John, I haven't posted new pics for a while, I've been kind of busy enjoying the florida sunshine. The work has been going slowly on the bus, I'm really in no hurry, just puttering as I get time and the material.  I've done a few things mainly to help with organizing and to keep peace on the homefront mainly, I did up a plant shelf with a galley rail over the couch to hold some decanters and libby's chiming clock and made a 110 inch cabinet over the windows on the other side of the living room.  Last few days I've been puttering around in the bathroom, I got a tub/shower from Bontragers and have been framing it in and pretty much trying to figure out what I want to do in there, I ordered a gold faucet set and shower head from them and am waiting for it to come in, I'd kinda like to do something different in there but haven't decided which route to take on it, I don't have my steamer with me so bending oak is kinda hard but we'll figure out something, just trying to make it a little different.
Logged
Phil H / Chicago
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 59





Ignore
« Reply #29 on: February 04, 2008, 07:34:17 PM »

Hey guys,

Thanks much for the imput. It sounds good.

JR..... I have been in your part of the country and it's beautiful. I would be out of Chicago in a heartbeat if I could do it but forced to stay for now. And you are so right, to find a building anywhere close to where I would need it would cost more that I could justify to spend. And your free bus....wow, that sounds good but I bet you want it back don't you  Smiley I actually have a 1990 102c3 that Dallas is going to do some work on for me so I can sell it, reinstalling a 8v92 motor. I have thought about using it as display but I really want a 45' coach with a 4 stroke/b500 so I keep thinking about waiting a while for them to start hitting the used market where I can afford the shell. I guess that's the reason I decided to buy the 45' rv, the bus shell is just to expensive right now....so I wait. I wish i could give you an honest answer on cost but since I have only done the one bus kitchen I have no way to give an accurate estimate. When I do my own I will clock time and materials so I can be prepared to discuss it with people.

Cody.....you are so right, alot of people here are so talented and blessed with mechanical skills (and it makes me so jealous  Smiley ). Myself.....well I can change the oil and that kinda exhaust my abilities. I am trying to learn more as I go and not be so intimidated by it. I think doing the interior of someone's bus would be much like doing their home. It's like you said, you have to pay attention to what the customer wants, not what I want. I spend time with them , listen to what they want and help them get from the start to the finish. Last year I was invovled with about half dozen people where they spent over 100k on their kitchen cabinets alone, and then they bought the granite tops and appliances on top of that. I did a real nice one with a beautiful paint and glaze perimiter and alder stain/glaze/distress island that was 150k.

I am going to keep thinking thru this.
Logged
Stan
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 973




Ignore
« Reply #30 on: February 05, 2008, 05:56:25 AM »

Phil: You are obviously into custom work for high end houses. If you read this board, and most other bus conversion boards, you will notice that most people are very cost conscious. There is a significant number who want to make their own fuel and buy used tires. Some pay top dollar to have mechanical work done because it is completely beyond their capabilities. Everyone has the capability to make chainsaw cabinets.

Conversion companies  now charge over $1m to the people who are prepared to pay top dollar and they deliver the finished product from their own shop. I think that you would get very few customers prepared to pay for your quality of work in an old bus. If you are looking for a semi retirement thing to occupy your time, that is different.
Logged
cody
Guest

« Reply #31 on: February 05, 2008, 06:46:30 AM »

Stan has brought up a valid point and one that is worth concidering, from my own experience, I've had the pleasure of meeting many great people over the last few years and have worked on a lot of buses.  I mainly based out of northern michigan but traveled to wisconsin and minnisota and into canada besides my native area to work on projects for rv's of all sorts, in that time I've met very few people that had deep pockets, the great majority of them were just regular people that worked hard and had families to raise, bills to pay and at the same time were building a coach. I never approached the idea from the standpoint of making money, I do it purely because I love creating a pile of sawdust, the drawback to making a pile of sawdust is the often I end up with a cabinet of some sort that I have to dispose of.  Luckily for me, the people that were kind enough to share their yard with me have also been willing to help me get rid of the cabinet or two that got piled up while I was making sawdust.  This arrangement has worked out well for me over the years and I can say that there is a need for cabinetry in the bussing community, as far as being able to make a living at it would depend on the level of skill and the pricepoint that a person established for the work. The high end is certainly out there and a person could establish a market for their skills, however, it takes time to get known by the community and build up a reputation for custom work, but in the long run it could be a very satisfying career.
« Last Edit: February 05, 2008, 06:48:15 AM by cody » Logged
skipn
Guest

« Reply #32 on: February 05, 2008, 06:55:46 AM »

Phil H,

  Though I somewhat agree with Stan to me those of us on the board are a rather independant lot
 and DIY when we can. For me I will probably end up spending 10k for RTA style cabinets. With some
 of the specialty cabinets made by myself. (and yes I do own a chainsaw or 2)
 Granted if I wanted true Rosewood Cabinets my cost would be through the roof. The shop hours are
 fairly static but the real costs come in on materials and some of the old school building and finishing methods.

 I believe most of us have a dream on what we are building and the cost realities temper what we can
 actually do. Even if it takes longer we set a vision and work towards realizing it. JMHO

  I wish you the best in your endeavors.

   Skip
« Last Edit: February 05, 2008, 06:58:58 AM by skipn » Logged
wvanative
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 273




Ignore
« Reply #33 on: February 05, 2008, 06:57:08 AM »

Phil, I think Stan hit the nail right on the head. Most bus guys are do it them selves’ type guys, and are not going to spend a lot of money to have someone do it for them. Have you thought about forming a partnership with a couple of guys to take your skills and produce a high end motor coach. You already have the MCI 102C-3 and you can do the interior. The success of a project like this would be in the careful and negotiation planning and the choosing of the right people to get it done. Each person will bring his own personal skills to the project then find a guy who is good with the electrical, and a guy to do the engine and mechanical, and a guy for the A/C, and so forth. Once the bus is finished it is then sold as a high end coach and the profits could be quite nice. There’s no doubt plenty of talent on this board to get the job done. Logistically it might be too much to over come but looking at the talent that is on this board who knows.

WVaNative
Logged

Dean Hamilton Villa Grove, IL East Central IL. Near Champaign
Still Dreaming and planning
H3Jim
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1398


1995 Prevost H3-41, series 60, B500 Allison




Ignore
« Reply #34 on: February 05, 2008, 07:16:06 AM »

Being able to "position" yourselves to the prospective buyer as being craftsman and high end and quality is extremely important.  Anyone that spends that kind of $ wants "the best".  You can't start with a 2 stroke coach and get that kind of $, so you have to either have a lot to start with, or get a flooring agreement with MCI or Prevost.  Not for the faint of heart. 

When you can buy a nice used country coach or marathon of the 2 stroke variety for under $200,000, its really hard to compete with that.  We all do it for the love of it.  I"m not sure I could even get the cost of my materials out if I had to sell, much less make anything for all the time spent engineering it or building it.
Logged

Jim Stewart
El Cajon, Ca.  (San Diego area)

Travel is more than the seeing of sights, it is a change that goes on, deep  and permanent, in the ideas of living.
Phil H / Chicago
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 59





Ignore
« Reply #35 on: February 05, 2008, 09:07:09 AM »

I appreciate all the feedback. And yes, the market I tend to sell the cabinets to is the upper/high end home where the dollar figure my customers tend to spend is in line with the total cost of the home the cabinets go in. That being said, I would be the first to say I can't even afford to pay the sales tax on their invoice. But hey, I'm tickled to death there are those out there with that kind of resources to spend....otherwise I couldn't eat. And you are so right, I do think that the reason most people build their own coach is simply because they enjoy doing it and want it done right the first time, whatever that right way is for them. I guess that is the reason I started one for myself many years ago, but just realized I was not up for the mechanical challenge I started. And again, thanks so much for the honest feedback.

Phil
Logged
Pages: 1 2 3 [All]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.18 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!