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Author Topic: Waterless Coolant  (Read 991 times)
NewbeeMC9
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1981 MC9 8V71, HT 740




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« on: January 31, 2008, 07:18:45 PM »

Anybody use this before?  Any thoughts opinions?

http://evanscooling.com/main23.htm
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Brassman
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« Reply #1 on: January 31, 2008, 07:34:45 PM »

Ah, at 32 bucks per gallon I think I'll stay with water, etheleyne glycol, and a SCA.
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Kristinsgrandpa
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1988 Neoplan AN 340, 6V-92 TA DDEC II, HT 748 ATEC




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« Reply #2 on: January 31, 2008, 07:56:53 PM »

I've never used this stuff but read a testamonial by a man who said it cured his overheating problems.

Not too long ago, on this board.

http://www.finalcharge.com/

Ed
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location: South central Ohio

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tekebird
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« Reply #3 on: January 31, 2008, 07:59:52 PM »

being that you should be operating at 180-185 degrees this stuff makes no difference.
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JackConrad
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« Reply #4 on: February 01, 2008, 05:58:52 AM »

I know 1 person that used it in his MC-9. He said the heat becomes a problem when coolant starts to boil, creating steam pockets (which do not transfer heat). He said this stuff does not boil and therefore the engine can run hotter. At that price, with my luck, the next day, I would have a leak develop and loose all that coolant & $$$$$.  Jack
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tekebird
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« Reply #5 on: February 01, 2008, 06:08:03 AM »

why not just fix your cooling problem.
I would suspect that even with this stuff if you get the engine temps to 250+ you will cause damage
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HighTechRedneck
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« Reply #6 on: February 01, 2008, 06:33:55 AM »

All of the clearance specifications in any engine (bearings, cylinder, oil viscosity, etc.) are based upon running at the designed operating temperature.  Running at a temperature above specification can cause damage even if you do keep it from boiling.
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belfert
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« Reply #7 on: February 01, 2008, 06:42:56 AM »

If you're looking at this stuff to cure overheating problems I think your money would probably be better spent elsewhere.

My guess is the majority of these buses didn't overheat when new.  It would be better to figure out why your bus is overheating than buying a bandaid like waterless coolant.

My bus is a four stroke which runs cooler to start, but it would start to overheat on any sort of long grade.  I struggled with it for a long time and eventually replaced the thermostats, water pump, and radiator core.  Now it stays pegged at 195 all the time.  Only on one grade through the Rockies on I80 did the temps go up a few degrees.  195 seem high, but everyone I've talked to with Series 60 engines in a bus say 195 to 200 is normal.
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Brian Elfert - 1995 Dina Viaggio 1000 Series 60/B500 - 75% done but usable - Minneapolis, MN
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