Bus Conversions dot Com Bulletin Board
October 22, 2014, 08:38:20 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: If you had an Online Subscription: It will not get torn up or crushed if you back over it with your bus.
   Home   Help Forum Rules Search Calendar Login Register BCM Home Page Contact BCM  
Pages: 1 2 [All]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Wall sheathing, choice of material?  (Read 2819 times)
Paladin
Dave Knight
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 711





Ignore
« on: February 09, 2008, 12:01:44 PM »

I'm talking the inside of the exterior walls, around the windows etc.
I am thinking of loading up on some supplies and was thinking 3/8" plywood? What do you guys use, any suggestions and tips for doing these walls?


-Dave
Logged

'75 MC-8   'Event Horizon'
8V71  HT740
Salt Lake City, Utah

"Have bus will travel read the card of the man, a Knight without armor in a savage land...."
Tenor
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 991



WWW

Ignore
« Reply #1 on: February 09, 2008, 12:09:16 PM »

I used 1/4" luon to complete what the po had started.   I plan to anchor things to the bus frame underneath.
Logged

Glenn Williams
Lansing, MI
www.threemenandatenor.com
1968 MCI 7 Ser. No. 7476 Unit No. 10056
8v71
4 speed Spicer
gumpy
Some Assembly Required
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3262


Slightly modified 1982 MC9


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #2 on: February 09, 2008, 12:16:37 PM »

I used 3/8" plywood. Easy to work with. Thick enough that's it's stable and can provide some support to other walls, cabinets, etc.
Logged

Craig Shepard
Located in Minnesquito

http://bus.gumpydog.com - "Some Assembly Required"
Paladin
Dave Knight
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 711





Ignore
« Reply #3 on: February 09, 2008, 12:19:58 PM »

That was my thinking as well.


-Dave
Logged

'75 MC-8   'Event Horizon'
8V71  HT740
Salt Lake City, Utah

"Have bus will travel read the card of the man, a Knight without armor in a savage land...."
FloridaCliff
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2458


"The Mighty GMC"




Ignore
« Reply #4 on: February 09, 2008, 12:29:02 PM »

I used the 15/32 (1/2") sanded plywood..

It is attached over over 1X4's, spaced at 1'  and that run horizontal on the wall with insulation between.

I ran the 1X's closer near the ceiling where I may attach cabinets, giving me an actual 3/4 attachment point.

So far I am pleased with no regrets.

The 15/32 will give you a nice solid surface to attach to.

Cliff

(Modified the plywood size)





« Last Edit: February 09, 2008, 12:50:01 PM by FloridaCliff » Logged

1975 GMC  P8M4905A-1160    North Central Florida

"There are basically two types of people. People who accomplish things, and people who claim to have accomplished things. The first group is less crowded."
Mark Twain
Marcus
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 73




Ignore
« Reply #5 on: February 09, 2008, 12:37:06 PM »

Dave, I used 1/2 " sanded plywood which doesn't cost much more than 3/8" and is stronger if you want to hang something on the wall. It was nice to attach cabinets to in the kitchen. It makes a nice rigid wall. Marc
Logged
FloridaCliff
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2458


"The Mighty GMC"




Ignore
« Reply #6 on: February 09, 2008, 12:52:57 PM »

Marcus,

Ya made me think about it.

Went out and measured.

I used the sanded 1/2 also.

I wanted a smooth surface to attach my unknown covering too!

Cliff
Logged

1975 GMC  P8M4905A-1160    North Central Florida

"There are basically two types of people. People who accomplish things, and people who claim to have accomplished things. The first group is less crowded."
Mark Twain
belfert
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5447




Ignore
« Reply #7 on: February 09, 2008, 12:54:26 PM »

I used 3/8" plywood on the inside of the sidewalls.
Logged

Brian Elfert - 1995 Dina Viaggio 1000 Series 60/B500 - 75% done but usable - Minneapolis, MN
Nick Badame Refrig/ACC
1989, MCI 102C3, 8V92T, HT740, 06' conversion FMCA# F-27317-S "Wife- 1969 Italian/German Style"
Global Moderator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 4874


Nick & Michelle Badame


WWW
« Reply #8 on: February 09, 2008, 04:18:48 PM »

Hi Dave,

I used 1/4" in my bath interior wall and I wished I used 3/8".

Where I used 3/8" on the window walls, every seam has held up very well but, the 1/4" seams are showing signs of movement.

Good Luck
Nick-
Logged

Whatever it takes!-GITIT DONE! 
Commercial Refrigeration- Ice machines- Heating & Air/ Atlantic Custom Coach Inc.
Master Mason- Cannon Lodge #104
https://www.facebook.com/atlanticcustomcoach
www.atlanticcustomcoach.com
cody
Guest

« Reply #9 on: February 09, 2008, 04:49:19 PM »

Guess I'm the odd one, I used all 3/4inch plywood for the walls and dressed them with 1/4 prefinished paneling in a white print. The plywood is screwed to the metal framework with 1/8th inch felt between the metal and the plywood to eliminate squeaks on the road if it ever moved.  Each hole for the screws was predrilled and metal framework was tapped for the screw and the screw was locked in place with epoxy so it wouldn't back out over time, my wife thinks it's over kill but I told her everyone does it that way lol. I'm not going to mention foam filling the hollow metal bracing for insulation and sound transference tho lol.
Logged
Nick Badame Refrig/ACC
1989, MCI 102C3, 8V92T, HT740, 06' conversion FMCA# F-27317-S "Wife- 1969 Italian/German Style"
Global Moderator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 4874


Nick & Michelle Badame


WWW
« Reply #10 on: February 09, 2008, 05:49:37 PM »

Guess I'm the odd one, I used all 3/4inch plywood for the walls and dressed them with 1/4 prefinished paneling in a white print. The plywood is screwed to the metal framework with 1/8th inch felt between the metal and the plywood to eliminate squeaks on the road if it ever moved.  Each hole for the screws was predrilled and metal framework was tapped for the screw and the screw was locked in place with epoxy so it wouldn't back out over time, my wife thinks it's over kill but I told her everyone does it that way lol. I'm not going to mention foam filling the hollow metal bracing for insulation and sound transference tho lol.

Cody,
Did you make Libby run all thoose screws in??  lol
Nick-
Logged

Whatever it takes!-GITIT DONE! 
Commercial Refrigeration- Ice machines- Heating & Air/ Atlantic Custom Coach Inc.
Master Mason- Cannon Lodge #104
https://www.facebook.com/atlanticcustomcoach
www.atlanticcustomcoach.com
FloridaCliff
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2458


"The Mighty GMC"




Ignore
« Reply #11 on: February 09, 2008, 06:59:40 PM »

While were talking about walls!

Nick turned me on to the idea of using body filler on the joints, worked perfect.  Wink

Cliff
Logged

1975 GMC  P8M4905A-1160    North Central Florida

"There are basically two types of people. People who accomplish things, and people who claim to have accomplished things. The first group is less crowded."
Mark Twain
jdr
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 28




Ignore
« Reply #12 on: February 09, 2008, 07:00:52 PM »

   Half inch 5'x5' baltic birch plywood for me. Very high quality strong stuff and cheep. I was getting it for $20 a sheet 4 years ago. Don't know what it is now. Jim
Logged
David Anderson
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 844


South Texas in the Eagle Ford Shale area




Ignore
« Reply #13 on: February 09, 2008, 07:55:35 PM »

I used 1/2" BC plywood.  I also put 15lb felt behind it as to minimize any humid air in the coach from condensing on cold bus framing and avoid any squeaking while traveling.  7 years now and has worked very well.

David
Logged
Paladin
Dave Knight
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 711





Ignore
« Reply #14 on: February 09, 2008, 10:00:18 PM »

While were talking about walls!

Nick turned me on to the idea of using body filler on the joints, worked perfect.  Wink

Cliff


I was thinking of filler for the joints but kind of thought it might crack over time.  Huh
Logged

'75 MC-8   'Event Horizon'
8V71  HT740
Salt Lake City, Utah

"Have bus will travel read the card of the man, a Knight without armor in a savage land...."
JackConrad
Orange Blossom Special II
Global Moderator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 4447


73' MC-8 8V71/HT740 Southwest Florida


WWW
« Reply #15 on: February 10, 2008, 07:01:03 AM »

I use 1/2" SandaPly.  It is relatively lightwwight, very smooth surface, and more pys than standard BC plywood. It is available at Home Depot, Lowe's and probably other building supply places. Instead us using roofing felt, I applied a heavy bead of polyurethane adhesive to all framing members and used a lot of screws.  Jack
Logged

Growing Older Is Mandatory, Growing Up Is Optional
Arcadia, Florida, When we are home
http://s682.photobucket.com/albums/vv186/OBS-JC/
David Anderson
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 844


South Texas in the Eagle Ford Shale area




Ignore
« Reply #16 on: February 10, 2008, 07:11:44 PM »

While were talking about walls!

Nick turned me on to the idea of using body filler on the joints, worked perfect.  Wink

Cliff

Nick and Cliff,

I used wallboard compound to cover the joints in my sheathing.  It covered them very well, but after about 4 years every joint cracked from bus contracting/expanding.  This played havoc with the wallpaper my wife liked so much.  I had to remove all the paper and glue up carpet.  I'm thankful I painted the plywood with Kilz before installation or that paper removal would have been awful.

However, in the kitchen we had originally installed a very thick vinyl paper that simulates ceramic tile and it has held up well.  Only if you look really closely you will be able to see the sheathing crack. 

I feel like body filler would have had similar results over time unless it can flex with the bus.

David
Logged
coachconverter
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 211



WWW

Ignore
« Reply #17 on: February 10, 2008, 07:52:05 PM »

I would agree, body filler or wood putty will crack after drying, especially after flexing going down the road, and even more so after experiencing numerous 100+ degree variations every season.

Before I started my conversion shop, I spent about 10 years learning as much as I could from you fine folk here, other owners of conversions, from dismantling previous conversions and from talking directly to experienced converters.  One thing that had to be beat in to my head was their avoidance of hardwood cabinetry or large area of real wood trim.

This is again due to the huge temperature variations and humidity suffered by bus interiors.  Just like your car in summer, you can take it from 150+ to 70 in about 15-20 minutes!  Not too many materials can survive that over time.  That's why so many high-end conversions use laminates for walls, cabinets and just about any large surface.

Personally, I dont care for the look of laminate cabinets and especially walls.  I prefer to use a luan or thin plywood base, putty up the seams, then coat it all with adhesive and cover with material.  I'm currently using a loose tweed material that after almost 14 months of harsh weather variance, has held up beautifully.  I did have to re-adhere a few ends, but that was due to operator error when installing :-)

HTH, here's a pic...
Logged
cody
Guest

« Reply #18 on: February 10, 2008, 10:53:38 PM »

I guess again I'm the odd man out on this but I'm a great fan of hardwood in homes and buses, I also have called a lot of high end converters friends over the years and the biggest reason a lot use laminates is the cost factor, one from marathon says laminates cover a broad range of sins and mistakes and still be marketable lol. My grandfather was a master cabinetmaker, as was my father, I don't call myself a cabinetmaker but I've been makeing sawdust for about 40 years now and I've found that hardwood still is very stable in a bus if done properly, joints don't have to open up and with a good fit there shouldn't be any need for a filler. The biggest problem I see with many conversions is the industries need to rely on cheaper grades of material and depending on pneumatics to fasten.  I realize that once again it boils down to cost and getting the product out but to me it cheapens it, sure it's pretty and it sells but I just have a hard time finding old world craftmanship in it. When I see cabinet grade plywood, for the most part I see standard plywood with a veneer, not lumber core plywood, there is a big differance in the stability found between a "cabinet" grade plywood with a fiber or bark series of plys and a true cabinet grade plywood with a lumber core, but that difference involves a hefty price difference too, one that most converters are unwilling or unable to pay.  True cabinet grade plywood offers a solid interior to anchor the hardwood front too and will create a very stable platform to work from where the lesser varieties will almost always cause problems down the road. A hardwood front thats properly dadoed into a quality framework will very rarely open up or create any problems, even with the movement or temperature variations of a bus, but like I said if the casework is of poor quality, the end result won't be as good as it could be. Before I get flamed, this is just my opinion and just my experience for what thats worth.
Logged
Stan
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 973




Ignore
« Reply #19 on: February 11, 2008, 05:01:09 AM »

For those who want to use 'wallpaper' spend the money and buy commercial wall covering. The material used in hotel corridors and restaurant walls is a vinyl  coated cloth that resists tearing and cracking. It requires a different method of application and a different glue than the paper wall covering. You will likely have to special order it from a paint and wall covering store.
Logged
David Anderson
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 844


South Texas in the Eagle Ford Shale area




Ignore
« Reply #20 on: February 11, 2008, 07:34:54 PM »

That is a good point, Stan.  I wish I would have known more 6 years ago when I put the wallpaper in the coach.  As I stated in the thread farther up the board, the thick wallpaper I put in my galley was almost similar to a vinyl table covering you might see at your favorite cafe or coffee shop.  I bought it at Home Depot and haven't seen any like it since. 

The point is the covering has to be able to stretch a bit and hide behind some sort of edge trim at all its ends.   Though it is just my opinion this is probably true for any type sheathing substrate in a motorhome application.   There is just too much movement.  It's like a constant earthquake. 

David
Logged
FloridaCliff
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2458


"The Mighty GMC"




Ignore
« Reply #21 on: February 11, 2008, 08:24:50 PM »

While were talking about walls!

Nick turned me on to the idea of using body filler on the joints, worked perfect.  Wink

Cliff

Nick and Cliff,

I used wallboard compound to cover the joints in my sheathing.  It covered them very well, but after about 4 years every joint cracked from bus contracting/expanding.  This played havoc with the wallpaper my wife liked so much.  I had to remove all the paper and glue up carpet.  I'm thankful I painted the plywood with Kilz before installation or that paper removal would have been awful.

However, in the kitchen we had originally installed a very thick vinyl paper that simulates ceramic tile and it has held up well.  Only if you look really closely you will be able to see the sheathing crack. 

I feel like body filler would have had similar results over time unless it can flex with the bus.

David

David,

So far I have not seen any cracking, anywhere.

I used it to fill the minor joints between the sheets of plywood and to cover the screws.

Cliff



Logged

1975 GMC  P8M4905A-1160    North Central Florida

"There are basically two types of people. People who accomplish things, and people who claim to have accomplished things. The first group is less crowded."
Mark Twain
coachconverter
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 211



WWW

Ignore
« Reply #22 on: February 12, 2008, 08:48:29 PM »

Regarding Commercial Wallpaper,

Probably stating the obvious, but if you pick a non-directional pattern you can get 6-8 foot wide rolls and run it lengthwise for no seams.  Just be prepared for the cost, or find odd-lots.  Plenty on eBay usually.

HTH

Todd
Logged
Pages: 1 2 [All]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.18 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!