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Author Topic: What were they thinking?  (Read 1679 times)
chazwood
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« on: February 15, 2008, 06:44:01 AM »

Has anyone been able to figure out why MCI (MC9) clipped all the corners of the aluminum sub-decking over the rear axle/engine compartment area?

When you take out the fiberglass insulation you can see the ground!  Seems like water spun up from the wheels would soak this area, and the area directly behind it (causing a thin layer of steel, mysteriously stuck between all the aluminum layers, to disintegrate).

 I'm wanting to foam these areas and don't want to close in these holes if there is a reason for them.

Thanks.
« Last Edit: February 15, 2008, 07:22:41 AM by chazwood » Logged

1992 MCI 102c3
Cummins l10 / Allison auto
Thekempters.com
Marcus
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« Reply #1 on: February 15, 2008, 11:53:28 AM »

Chaz, Do you still need that manual ? Marc
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Hartley
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« Reply #2 on: February 15, 2008, 03:03:43 PM »

A shot in the dark guess would be to let air out of the interior space.

The A/C & Heat pulls air from outside to pressurize the interior a little, That pressure has to bleed off somewhere. That would be my guess, I found the same thing on mine. Going out the back would help keep fumes from being sucked inside.

Not that it really helped...soot gets everywhere anyway...

Dave....
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chazwood
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« Reply #3 on: February 15, 2008, 04:18:25 PM »

Chaz, Do you still need that manual ? Marc

Yes. More than ever. Grin
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1992 MCI 102c3
Cummins l10 / Allison auto
Thekempters.com
chazwood
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« Reply #4 on: February 15, 2008, 04:21:27 PM »

A shot in the dark guess would be to let air out of the interior space.

The A/C & Heat pulls air from outside to pressurize the interior a little, That pressure has to bleed off somewhere. That would be my guess, I found the same thing on mine. Going out the back would help keep fumes from being sucked inside.

Not that it really helped...soot gets everywhere anyway...

Dave....


But the whole back deck was covered with sheet aluminum, glued down, directly under the plywood to seal the interior from exterior
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1992 MCI 102c3
Cummins l10 / Allison auto
Thekempters.com
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« Reply #5 on: February 15, 2008, 06:17:57 PM »

Gawd... I think my lights are flickering again. Undecided Undecided

I don't have the answer. I didn't find the laminated stuff on mine
when I looked. Maybe I was looking in the wrong place.

Sorry.. I "did" say shot in the dark...

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chazwood
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« Reply #6 on: February 16, 2008, 05:59:16 AM »

Starting at the end of the floor air duct, the framing gets much heavier to support the rear wheel and engine area. Directly under the plywood floor in this area (on top of the frame) was a sheet of aluminum that covered the whole area, right up to the back ledge. This layer was glued and screwed down to beat the band. Next came some dense fiberglass (cut to fit into all the little areas between the many angled supports) then a final skin of aluminum underneath the bus. This final skin was also pieced to fit into the many square areas but each corner was clipped. this would allow any water being splashed up from the road to soak the layer of hard fiberglass sandwiched in between. (And rust out any paper thin sheets of steel or screws that exist in that area also.) Huh

The only reason I can come up with is maybe they had to clip the corners in order to fit these pieces in. 

That being said.....Something I DO know, is that hidden somewhere deep in the ranks of the MCI design teams, there was a engineer who was deathly afraid of the "crap hitting the road". And if you don't believe me you have never tried to take the pottie holding tank out of one of these buses. Here's a tip: If you find yourself in an MCI, in an emergency (like a tornado.... or attack from outer space) all you gotta do is jump into the toilet .....you'll be safe. That thing was ridiculously over built,..... shoot, it was even insulated, then covered with a bullet proof fiberglass shell.  Roll Eyes
I had to lay all over the side of the engine ,all up in the belts, (with visions of one of my kids starting the engine....."Hey charli, what's this round button?") just to reach the hanger bolts and they turned out to be about two inches of fine thread. Try that when you're playing Houdini with your body and all you get is a one click stroke on your socket wrench. Tongue

Glad that's over. Smiley
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1992 MCI 102c3
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Tenor
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« Reply #7 on: February 16, 2008, 08:05:32 AM »

Chaz,
Didn't you know that all buses are first engineered to haul toilet waste, heat and air conditioning safely with occasional passengers?
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Glenn Williams
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1968 MCI 7 Ser. No. 7476 Unit No. 10056
8v71
4 speed Spicer
Tony LEE
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« Reply #8 on: February 16, 2008, 04:12:53 PM »

Stop whingeing chazwood. Getting the bathroom out is one of the standard rites or passage for busnuts.

The torn skin heals up eventually and in time you WILL regain full use of your fingers.
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chazwood
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« Reply #9 on: February 16, 2008, 04:26:07 PM »

Stop whingeing chazwood.

Maybe that's my problem....too much "whingeing" Grin
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1992 MCI 102c3
Cummins l10 / Allison auto
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Tony LEE
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« Reply #10 on: February 16, 2008, 10:23:49 PM »

We have an expression "Built like a brick S**t-house" to indicate something built very solidly so it will last. Those of us with MCIs will know that "Built like an MCI S**t-house" is just as appropriate.

Those who choose to leave the AC compressor in place know that the fibreglass cowling also has to be ripped to shreds to get the tank size down enough to get it out the door past the compressor.
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DavidInWilmNC
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« Reply #11 on: February 17, 2008, 07:02:46 AM »

My -8 also had those 'clipped corners' in the aluminum underneath.  I cut squares of scrap alum, bent the edges up, and riveted and sealed them in place over the openings.  As to the restroom... I didn't think it was all that difficult to get out.  I had a lot of rusted screws that I just ground or chiseled off.  I got the entire thing out without damaging it - for some reason, a friend wanted it!  The tank was another thing entirely.  If MCI had used mild steel mounts instead of stainless, it would have been a LOT easier to get out - it would have probably just rusted itself out for me.  On another note, my holding tank was full of 'goodies' when I got my bus.  It didn't start to stink 'til a few days after it was in the driveway!

David
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chazwood
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« Reply #12 on: February 17, 2008, 07:12:00 AM »

My -8 also had those 'clipped corners' in the aluminum underneath.  I cut squares of scrap alum, bent the edges up, and riveted and sealed them in place over the openings. 

David

Yeah, the fix seems easy ...but I'm hesitating because it's obvious they did it for a reason. I'm trying to avoid ..."hey, that's why they did that" scenarios (I'd hate to have to rip the floor back up some day.) Just thought someone might know for sure. MCI probably doesn't even know why they did it anymore.
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1992 MCI 102c3
Cummins l10 / Allison auto
Thekempters.com
DavidInWilmNC
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« Reply #13 on: February 17, 2008, 09:41:48 AM »

My -8 also had those 'clipped corners' in the aluminum underneath.  I cut squares of scrap alum, bent the edges up, and riveted and sealed them in place over the openings.

David

Yeah, the fix seems easy ...but I'm hesitating because it's obvious they did it for a reason. I'm trying to avoid ..."hey, that's why they did that" scenarios (I'd hate to have to rip the floor back up some day.) Just thought someone might know for sure. MCI probably doesn't even know why they did it anymore.

I think they did it because it would have been very difficult / impossible to get that piece of aluminum with edges at 90 up in the frame.  Whatever reason, it allowed moisture to get in and make for some nasty insulation (and rust).  I was somewhat concerned about moisture getting in to that area and not having a way to get out.  There was a piece of metal riveted in place over an opening leading to the area above the wheel wells.  This was in the passenger side rear bay near the voltage regulator.  I removed the rivets and left the opening uncovered so the area wouldn't be completely sealed.  I cut a similar opening on the driver's side.  When I had the rear floor up, I removed the wheel liners, painted everything, and re-sealed them with butyl tape and black polyurethane sealer.  I used spray undercoat on the fiberglass wheel liners - they look just about new now.  I also replaced the rusted metal shields over the fiberglass liners; the old ones were almost just laying there.  When I reattached the wheel liners, I used stainless screws and washers.  If I have to get into the area again, at least I'll be able to do it from below, but I'm sure that I won't need to.

David
« Last Edit: February 17, 2008, 04:05:54 PM by DavidInWilmNC » Logged
chazwood
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« Reply #14 on: February 17, 2008, 12:01:57 PM »

 Clipping the corners just to get it in, makes the most sense to me also.......you'd think they would have thought about the water/rust issues, but who knows? I think I'll block them up myself.
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1992 MCI 102c3
Cummins l10 / Allison auto
Thekempters.com
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