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Author Topic: Tilt steering column for Ross steering  (Read 1701 times)
NCbob
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« on: June 05, 2006, 07:21:37 AM »

My MC5A came with replacement Ross power steering installed by Sam Caylor, I believe. Is there a tilt wheel mechanism which might be compatable with the Ross gear?  I've heard of some of the guys using the Freightliner tilt mechanism but no reference was made as to what year, model, etc.

I know that 22" steering wheel has to go one of these days 'cause my little short arms can hardly reach the top of it in it's present angle.  Would suppose that in the days before assisted steering the operators of these busses had arms like Popeye and a left leg like Alley Oop!  Grin

NCbob
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TomC
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« Reply #1 on: June 05, 2006, 07:53:31 AM »

The Freightliner steering column from the FLD line of the older style conventional cabs is what is commonly used.  Mainly because there is a good junk yard supply of them and they adjust manually.  There's nothing to say you couldn't use the steering column from the Century/Columbia/Coronado line, but these have an air operated release mechanism that would require an air hook up and some sort of air switch (like a spring loaded momentarily on that goes to off position when released).

It is a fairly easy job to do.  But first look under the front of you coach right under the floor where the steering column comes through to the steering box.  If it has a short "drive shaft", then it isn't to much problem to alter the drive shaft to accomodate the new tilt/telescopic steering column.  On the other hand if it is a straight solid tube connected directly to the steering box (I highly doubt this) then it'll be a much bigger job to modify-so much so I'd recommend not doing it.

As to the steering wheel, why don't you first try getting a nice 18" leather wrapped steering wheel?  I have found that no matter what the steering wheel position is, you usually get used to it very quickly.  In another way of putting it, once you adjust the adjustable tilt/telescopic steering column, most people just leave it in that position.  Unless of course you are of over ample proportions that the only way in and out of the driver's seat is by tilting the wheel. Of which the Freightliner air controlled column is really neat-when you hit the air control button the steering column is spring loaded to pop up to the top position.  Good Luck, TomC
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NCbob
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« Reply #2 on: June 05, 2006, 10:48:28 AM »

Tom, I have a U-joint about 10" (give or take) below the steering wheel which should allow me to install the truck steering unit.
And no, I'm not a 'biggy', that's why I'd like to get a smaller diameter wheel closer to me.

Thanks for the info...I'll put out some feelers for the FLD type.

NCbob
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pvcces
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« Reply #3 on: June 05, 2006, 09:24:53 PM »

NCBob, why do you want to reach the top of the wheel?

Tom Caffrey
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Ketchikan, Alaska
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Tom Caffrey PD4106-2576
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Ketchikan, Alaska
NCbob
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« Reply #4 on: June 07, 2006, 04:58:25 AM »

Why would I wish to reach the top of the steering wheel?  Well Tom, perhaps it's my 'Security Blanket'  or desire to be totally 'in control'.  I've been driving for over 55 years now and while my reflexes are slowing down a bit, the brainless activity of the younger drivers is speeding up.

By most standards, I'm still a newbie...having only driven my bus a bit over 1000 miles.  I have encountered situations where, either by not being far enough ahead of the bus or just plain misjudgment I'd have preferred to be able to reach for the top of the wheel to complete a turn or other maneuver.

Certainly, as quickly as I can find what I want, the diameter of that monstrous steering wheel is going to be reduced in size.  It will reduce the tendancy to 'oversteer', more than likely a trait among us 'newbies', and lessen the possibilities of being behind the curve in the execution of turns in confined situtaions.

In any event it's my choice and opinion, not an authoritarian overview or recommendation for everyone.
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pvcces
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« Reply #5 on: June 07, 2006, 07:58:27 PM »

NCBob, I wasn't trying to give you a hard time; it was more a case of trying to get you to think about the situation a little more.

We retain the large wheel on our coach, and I can't say that I've ever felt that I needed to turn it faster. It makes me wonder what the track record might look like with the professional drivers.

A lot of them are small, but the wheels are large. They most drastic cases of skidding or loss of control accidents seem to have come from oversteer. Once you get that started, things get dicey in a hurry.

Perhaps some people who have put in a lot of time driving commercially could add something to this discussion.

For what it's worth.

Tom Caffrey
Suncatcher
Ketchikan, Alaska
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Tom Caffrey PD4106-2576
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Ketchikan, Alaska
NCbob
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« Reply #6 on: July 15, 2006, 02:41:01 PM »

Thanks for you input, Tom.  I now have the steering wheel off to do a dashboard replacement and am more than ever convinced that I would like a smaller wheel...not for appearance sake..but it will allow me to get a bit closer to the wheel and still keep my heels on the floor.

And, yes, it would be nice to have some input from some of the OTR drivers.

NCbob
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rayshound
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« Reply #7 on: July 16, 2006, 08:42:18 PM »

Bob, you might want to look at ronthebusnut.com web site. He has the steering colums and several wheels. He has pictures at least you could get some ideas.  Ray
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