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Author Topic: Train whistle  (Read 4551 times)
chazwood
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« on: March 21, 2008, 01:00:34 PM »

When I shut down my bus, my air system would take about 5 mins. to completely and totally bleed flat. I knew I had an air leak because the whole time it was leaking it sounded like a far away train whistle. Oooooohhh,Ooooooooo......pause .....Oooohhhh,Oooooooo. Kind'a long, lonely and far away. Pretty sound. Reminded me of days gone by ...happier times.... summer days spent barefooted in the wheat fields, back behind the barn, where you could just see the afternoon sun reflecting off the tracks as they flowed off into the distance.....times when I didn't have to worry about leaking buses. Cheesy ( EDIT: disregard that last little bit as anything factual ....except the part about the leaking buses Grin)

Anyway, I knew the general area the train was coming from but was unprepared to risk my life to investigate further. (after reading all the posts, from you guys, about how many ways a bus can crush you like a bug......Overheard: Bus to knucklehead.... "You want it slow or fast, buddy?")  I finally took courage,  got under the monster and discovered something surprising......the long, lonely train whistle sound was coming from the regulator between the two back leveling valves, but not like how you would think....I was feeling around the regulator to see if I could learn anything (Hint: if you do this, wear disposable gloves....that black stuff is permanent pigment for your fingers) and much to my surprise, the leak felt like it was coming straight out of the middle of the housing of the regulator. I wiggled around , stuck my head up into the space between the rear differential and the air bags, with my head touching both (not much room....plenty scary......I tried not to think of giant nutcrackers,) to see if I could get a peek at the spot, and sure enough ,the side of the regulator had a short gash cut in it that was leaking. It was not a split.....it was a gash, by impact.

Strange.

That thing is so tucked away, it's hard to reach with your hand, I wonder what could have popped it? It looks like what a rock might do, but that rock had to ricochet around awhile before it found it's mark. What are the chances? Sad
« Last Edit: March 21, 2008, 01:26:08 PM by chazwood » Logged

1983 Eagle Bus Model 10
6V92
Thekempters.com
Dallas
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« Reply #1 on: March 21, 2008, 01:12:26 PM »

ChazW,

to make a long story even longer, do you need one or are you ordering one from the "Price King" (MCI)?

If you could make a photo of the offending part, most of us would muchly appreciate it.

We could even tell you how much, and how long to rebuild or replace, or even send you a used one if needed.

I wonder about you guy, I walked through many a field when I was young and bare footed.. it hurt!

When I shut down my bus, my air system would take about 5 mins. to completely and totally bleed flat. I knew I had an air leak because the whole time it was leaking it sounded like a far away train whistle. Oooooohhh,Ooooooooo......pause .....Oooohhhh,Oooooooo. Kind'a long, lonely and far away. Pretty sound. Reminded me of days gone by ...happier times.... summer days spent barefooted in the wheat fields, back behind the barn, where you could just see the afternoon sun reflecting off the tracks as they flowed off into the distance.....times when I didn't have to worry about leaking buses. Cheesy

Anyway, I knew the general area the train was coming from but was unprepared to risk my life to investigate further. (after reading all the posts, from you guys, about how many ways a bus can crush you like a bug......Overheard: Bus to knucklehead.... "You want it slow or fast, buddy?")  I finally took courage,  got under the monster and discovered something surprising......the long, lonely train whistle sound was coming from the regulator between the two back leveling valves, but not like how you would think....I was feeling around the regulator to see if I could learn anything (Hint: if you do this, wear disposable gloves....that black stuff is permanent pigment for your fingers) and much to my surprise, the leak felt like it was coming straight out of the middle of the housing of the regulator. I wiggled around , stuck my head up into the space between the rear differential and the air bags, with my head touching both (not much room....plenty scary......I tried not to think of giant nutcrackers,) to see if I could get a peek at the spot, and sure enough ,the side of the regulator had a short gash cut in it that was leaking. It was not a split.....it was a gash, by impact.

Strange.

That thing is so tucked away, it's hard to reach with your hand, I wonder what could have popped it? It looks like what a rock might do, but that rock had to ricochet around awhile before it found it's mark. What are the chances? Sad
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chazwood
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« Reply #2 on: March 21, 2008, 01:22:22 PM »

That part about the wheat field was.....OK, total fabrication......you busted me.  Sad (I must have read something like that in a book somewhere) Sometimes I get carried away while trying to paint a visual scene. My Dad use to say "I've told you a million times....don't exaggerate"

I took a pipe clamp and a piece of rubber (for now) and slowed the leak down considerably, cuz that thing is going to be a bear to get out. I can't take a picture of it right now (my flash is busted and it is very dark up in there.)
« Last Edit: March 21, 2008, 01:28:43 PM by chazwood » Logged

1983 Eagle Bus Model 10
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« Reply #3 on: March 21, 2008, 01:41:25 PM »

chazwood...I appreciated and enjoyed your written description.  Kinda reminded me of Bakersfield California where at night you can hear the trains going East out of town every 30 minutes or soos.

I also have dim (muted?) memories of being 6 again and visiting my Great Uncle Frank who lived in/near Roanoke Virginia and hearing the old steam engines pulling out of town.  Sounded very cool.

Getting back "on track" (yuk, yuk) maybe your just have a..."split gash"?  Who knows what evil lurks in the hearts of man, er nature which could have caused your implackable road rash damage?  Smiley Smiley Smiley
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Dallas
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« Reply #4 on: March 21, 2008, 01:50:19 PM »

ChazW,

if you can't get a photo, try describing the part exactly.... Many of us may have one handy to send you, or we may be able to tell you where to get one other than MCI. Most of the brake and air system parts on an MCI, Eagle and Prevost are off the shelf items at you local truck parts dealer.

I don't have an 8 or 9 manual but you are welcome to the one I have uploaded to my website.. It's a manual for the 96A through 102C3.. both parts and maintenance. Email me for details. Most of it is relevant to the 7, 8 and 9.

It won't cost you a dime, unless you want to contribute to the "Keep This Website Alive" fund.
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chazwood
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« Reply #5 on: March 21, 2008, 01:58:06 PM »

Stop, you're too kind  Grin ( Edit: Opps..... not you Dallas...I meant HB of CJ ...... you squeezed a post in on me...can't type that fast.)

I do remember, when I was five, being at my parent's friend's country house where you could stroll thorough a short section of woods and emerge onto a elevated set of tracks in the middle of nowhere ( I don't know why... but I remember thinking woods were a strange place to put train tracks)

We use to put pennies on the track and stand so close as the train approached the engineer went nuts blowing his horn at us. Which is what we wanted Grin

 (There weren't any wheat fields though.....that I can remember.)

As to the part....it's a small regulator mounted right next to the passenger side rear leveling valve. (Looks almost impossible to get out.)

« Last Edit: March 21, 2008, 02:18:28 PM by chazwood » Logged

1983 Eagle Bus Model 10
6V92
Thekempters.com
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« Reply #6 on: March 21, 2008, 02:46:11 PM »

As to the part....it's a small regulator mounted right next to the passenger side rear leveling valve. (Looks almost impossible to get out.)

There is no mechanical problem that cannot be solved by brute force and ignorance Wink
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chazwood
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« Reply #7 on: March 21, 2008, 03:47:52 PM »

Yeah, I'm with you on that front.  Wink
This is in on of those places where you can't touch anything without getting a eyefull. I hate that. Makes you wonder how much the guy in the factory was cussin'
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1983 Eagle Bus Model 10
6V92
Thekempters.com
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« Reply #8 on: March 21, 2008, 05:41:08 PM »

CWOOD,
The guy in the factory was most likely not cuss'n at all,
He most likely put it in before the floor was put down.
Jim
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between Milwaukee & Madison
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« Reply #9 on: March 21, 2008, 07:01:41 PM »

Why don't you just take the passenger side drive wheels off? Block the body and block the axle. Then you can get right in there to access all those air type goodies. At least the MC-5 is set up that way. It takes about 15 minutes to get them both off. Assume you have concrete to work on and know where to block the body and how to jack on the axle.
Fred
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Fred Thomson
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« Reply #10 on: March 21, 2008, 08:26:18 PM »

Hello.

A regulator in that location sounds like the one for the DD3 parking regulated supply.

where does the line come from/go to on this offending part?

On those regulators, the cost of the kit or buying a new one, the kit savings isn't worth your time and screwing around to find the casing is shot anyway.

Fredward has the answer. Working on that stuff is WAY easier with the wheels pulled off.

I found that a good used railway tie and a piece of 2x6 lumber makes a great prop for under the flat axle assembly after you get it jacked. Then once the tires are off, the right piece of wood into the bump stop on the axle and you are safe to go.

Use lots of penetrating spray, and be careful of that copper pipe....

happy coaching!
buswarrior
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chazwood
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« Reply #11 on: March 21, 2008, 08:29:54 PM »

That sounds like a plan. I have the "Manly Man" lug wrench, so it should be easy. Good Idea.


Thanks.

Charwood.
« Last Edit: March 21, 2008, 08:36:43 PM by chazwood » Logged

1983 Eagle Bus Model 10
6V92
Thekempters.com
chazwood
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« Reply #12 on: March 22, 2008, 06:54:01 AM »

I crawled back under the bus to have a look-see (and let the "Manly Man" Lug wrench idle for a few minutes......to warm it up) and noticed that if I took off the big dualie whoppers, the airbags, shocks and air beam look like they might still be in the way of a good time. Is this true?
« Last Edit: March 22, 2008, 06:57:46 AM by chazwood » Logged

1983 Eagle Bus Model 10
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Thekempters.com
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« Reply #13 on: March 22, 2008, 07:08:16 AM »

You will be snaking your arms through all the gaps, and you will be able to work upright. Our strength and agility suffer when lying on our backs, and the crap falls in your eyes.

You'll want to get as big a block into the suspension point as you can to maintain all those gaps so you can see and work through the holes. Put a block into the other side by reaching around, so it settles evening.

More light on the subject, less shadow.

Multiple trips to the tool box and the hardware store, as the nasty thing won't come out of there without a fight. Lots of dropped tools and some bleeding...

You'll be glad you took the tires off.

happy coaching!
buswarrior
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« Reply #14 on: March 22, 2008, 08:08:45 AM »

All this makes me glad my RTS has an access hatch through the floor over the rear axle (and glad that I preserved access when I built my floor).  It's not a big hatch, but enough to work through if needed.
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