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Author Topic: Any reasons not to run vinyl flooring under walls?  (Read 3877 times)
captain ron
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« Reply #15 on: April 11, 2008, 08:00:02 AM »

I withdraw my horse from this race
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belfert
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« Reply #16 on: April 11, 2008, 09:59:24 AM »

First off commercial vinyl should not be peremter glued. It wasn't designed that way. If it has a hydrcord backing then it MUST be full spread which brings to mind again that any full spread application will be VERY hard if not impossible to do with a piece 40 foot long. Getting it IN without breaking the backing or ripping it would be hard enough. Keeping it straight IN the bus is next!
A buch a foot is not really cheap since they usually charge by the square foot. That makes it 9 bucks a yard. A 9x40 is 360 sq feet or 40 sq yds.

Thank you for the advice.  I will talk to the flooring place about all of these issues before buying anything.  They might have something in a good grade of residential vinyl they want to get rid of.  I just thought going with commercial would be better than some of the residential vinyl that is about as thick as construction paper.

As far as price goes is $1 a square foot expensive for commercial vinyl remnants?  I priced out residential vinyl and anything at Home Depot/Menards that wasn't junk is $1.50 to over $3 a square foot.  I don't see some of the $0.99 a square foot glueless vinyl with the foam backing lasting very long in a bus conversion.

Any recommendations for seaming the flooring if I don't have any natural breaks?  Maybe I'll have to hire a pro to lay the vinyl, but I was hoping to avoid that.  I've done a little bit of vinyl laying in the past.
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Brian Elfert - 1995 Dina Viaggio 1000 Series 60/B500 - 75% done but usable - Minneapolis, MN
captain ron
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« Reply #17 on: April 11, 2008, 10:10:50 AM »

Don't ask me I haven't laid anything for a while. Sad
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Ray D
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« Reply #18 on: April 11, 2008, 10:15:39 AM »

Inspect home depot, menard, lowe's goods very carefully, most of what they carry is seconds, stuff that doesn't quite qualify for the regular stores.  So are there tubs, showers and many other items.

Ray D
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belfert
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« Reply #19 on: April 11, 2008, 10:52:12 AM »

Inspect home depot, menard, lowe's goods very carefully, most of what they carry is seconds, stuff that doesn't quite qualify for the regular stores.  So are there tubs, showers and many other items.

Has anyone ever verified with a distributor or manufacturer that they are shipping seconds to home improvement stores, especially seconds not labeled as such?  There are at least 3,000 home improvement stores in the USA.  How could there possibly be enough seconds to stock all these stores?

I keep reading on the Internet folks claiming that power tools sold at home improvement stores have cheaper innards than the same model sold elsewhere.  Home improvement stores probably sell a good majority of tools sold today so it wouldn't make much sense from the manufacturer's viewpoint.  I think they would be in big legal trouble if the model number was sold with different innards at different retailers.

I have no intention of buying vinyl at Home Depot or any other home improvement store.
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Brian Elfert - 1995 Dina Viaggio 1000 Series 60/B500 - 75% done but usable - Minneapolis, MN
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« Reply #20 on: April 11, 2008, 11:09:12 AM »

I keep reading on the Internet folks claiming that power tools sold at home improvement stores have cheaper innards than the same model sold elsewhere.  Home improvement stores probably sell a good majority of tools sold today so it wouldn't make much sense from the manufacturer's viewpoint.  I think they would be in big legal trouble if the model number was sold with different innards at different retailers.

I've never heard of that, but what I could believe is that lower-grade versions of the same internals are sold through cheaper outlets - this is exactly what happens with computer chips, for example, where a batch of identically manufactured chips are tested, with the best ones going to Mcdonnell Douglas and Grumman for $1000 each, the average ones going to Sony and Kenwood for $1 each, and the barely acceptable ones going into some throwaway electronic toy at 1c each. My Dad used to work in company that made brake discs (rotors) for cars, and the ones that passed the safety tests but had visible discolouration of the metal etc went onto new cars (ie. where no one would see or handle them), whereas the 'best' ones that looked perfect always went for use as spare parts.

Jeremy
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« Reply #21 on: April 11, 2008, 12:13:24 PM »

No, not all they have are seconds, but they do take and sell them, that is why you have to inspect carefully.

Ray D
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FloridaCliff
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« Reply #22 on: April 11, 2008, 12:52:50 PM »

Inspect home depot, menard, lowe's goods very carefully, most of what they carry is seconds, stuff that doesn't quite qualify for the regular stores.  So are there tubs, showers and many other items.

Ray D

Ray,

I also would be interested in some proof on that statement!

I have found that they sell repackaged, under there own brand or off brand.

I have seen this in several flooring items when I was in the market.

My experience has been that they generally stock the lower end of an item in store, but higher quality can be ordered in.   

I have an opened box of tile that I will return soon to Lowes, I needed two pieces out of the case to finish.

They will take it back, no hassles, that's why these retailers are so successful, price and convenience, not 2nd hand goods.

Cliff

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tekebird
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« Reply #23 on: April 11, 2008, 12:57:40 PM »

hmmm, being that you are doing a sort of utilitarian Desert freindly conversion....why not install bus fllooring back in it.

the stuff will last forever is easy  to clean/sweep.

there is a reason they don;t use normal stuff in there OEM
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Tenor
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« Reply #24 on: April 11, 2008, 01:03:18 PM »

Don't forget to look for clearance snap together wood flooring, the pergo knockoff stuff.  I found it for about $.80 per foot.  It was a pallet deal at value city.  Sam's club sometime's has the stuff clearanced out too.  It was super easy to lay down, tough as nails, and you just build everything over the top of it and screw it to the floor.  Just my 2 cents.  Good luck!

Glenn
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Glenn Williams
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« Reply #25 on: April 11, 2008, 01:13:40 PM »

   Well as a lowes employee i have never heard of selling seconds we sell the same name brands as other stores. by the way i used prorlean tile in my bus and it is like the day i layed it ...lol

                                          Richard

PS; mak has used lowes products in his motorcabins












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belfert
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« Reply #26 on: April 11, 2008, 01:18:56 PM »

Doug, Any ideas how much bus flooring costs?  You're right it is good stuff.

Glenn, I suspect laminate flooring would scratch too easily with sand and dirt.  Vinyl isn't perfect either, but I think it will hold up better.
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Brian Elfert - 1995 Dina Viaggio 1000 Series 60/B500 - 75% done but usable - Minneapolis, MN
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« Reply #27 on: April 11, 2008, 01:21:22 PM »

hmmm, being that you are doing a sort of utilitarian Desert freindly conversion....why not install bus fllooring back in it.

Hey, that's actually not a bad idea.
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Tenor
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« Reply #28 on: April 11, 2008, 01:25:18 PM »

Belfert,
That flooring is tough!   I've got sawdust, screws, etc laying all over the place and I haven't gotten any scratches, and I'm using the cheap stuff!  Charley had put it in his old 4905 that I bought and it did heavy duty traffic for him and tons of campground dirt with me and it had no scratches either.  I've even slid my 40lb propane tank around on it and no issues.  Good luck!

Glenn
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Glenn Williams
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paulcjhastings
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« Reply #29 on: April 11, 2008, 03:42:32 PM »

Just put aluminum diamond plate down and you can weld all of your furniture to it so it won't move Wink
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Paul Hastings
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