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Author Topic: Idling your bus?  (Read 2869 times)
Highway Yacht
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« on: April 12, 2008, 01:15:08 PM »

Just wanted to get an idea of how long any of you have let your buses idle at one time. I remember years ago when I drove a truck, we would leave out one week and return the next week in the truck without ever shutting the engine off. We spent many nights in a truckstop parking lot with the engine idling for hours to keep heat in the cab. I know fuel mixtures have changed and so have newer improved engines but I have been told recently that idling a Detroit will cause engine damage. With the price of fuel, I guess you are wondering why someone would want to idle an engine for any length of time but I have no tags on my bus yet and it is really not roadworthy at this time due to the conversion process. So what is worse?... Letting the engine sit for months not running or cranking it every couple weeks and letting it run and idle for say an hour to keep the batteries charged. Thanks...
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luvrbus
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« Reply #1 on: April 12, 2008, 01:18:06 PM »

jlink, if you have a 2 stroke 71 or 92 series idling is the worst thing you can do I would let it set
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Len Silva
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« Reply #2 on: April 12, 2008, 01:36:08 PM »

jlink, I am far from being an expert but I have monitored these and other boards for many years.  I think the consensus would be to not even start it if you cannot drive it at least 50 miles or so. Probably better to sit for a couple of years than to start it if you cannot get it completely warmed up (which you cannot do without driving it)

Stick a rag in the exhaust and trip the emergency shut down to keep moisture out of the engine.  Put a big note on the steering wheel so you don't forget when it is time to start it for real.

Len
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Highway Yacht
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« Reply #3 on: April 12, 2008, 02:38:33 PM »

jlink, if you have a 2 stroke 71 or 92 series idling is the worst thing you can do I would let it set

It is a 2 stroke, It is a 6V92TA DDEC IV
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Green-Hornet
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« Reply #4 on: April 12, 2008, 04:09:08 PM »

In an OTR truck I can see why they keep them running for comfort and charging cell phone and running computers ect.. I think the trend with a lot of the newer ones is to put a Gen set in like the RVs to save on the fuel cost. I think a gallon an hour for running the engine vs the minute amount in a generator makes scense. That way there is really no need to idle at all when yer stopped.
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« Reply #5 on: April 12, 2008, 04:22:32 PM »

jlink, I had a similar question about a year and a half ago.  So I posted the question and a poll.  Here is the post:

http://www.busconversions.com/bbs/index.php?topic=2320.0

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Highway Yacht
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« Reply #6 on: April 12, 2008, 05:38:22 PM »

I must admit that I have been cranking it up about once a month and letting it run on fast idle for around 30 minutes at a time. I have also been moving it around on my property (1/2 mile long driveway). I thought that would help the transmission, tires, rear-end...etc. Maybe I should re-think things throughs.
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« Reply #7 on: April 12, 2008, 09:24:38 PM »

Fiddle Faddle.

Be warned: Busnuts are notorious for thinking that the worn out old prostitute of a bus is a church going virgin that requires protection from the evil idling hoards...

If you are going to leave the engine for months, you should follow the recommendations for long term storage from DD.

Otherwise, run it to keep the rust off the cylinder walls and don't worry about it. Change the oil when it comes time to go for a drive if your idling time during the non-driving time has numbers in the dozens of hours. Move it up and down as you are able to roll the lube over the other parts. Keep the batteries up with a good quality battery charger, they'll last longer.

Longer drives, once you are road worthy, should be long enough to warm the moisture out of the engine, tranny and differential, which accumulates over time with the humidity and weather changes. FastFred's often recommended 100 mile trip once a month is an example of this strategy.

You choose whichever strategy works for you in an attempt to prevent the internals from suffering corrosion.

happy coaching!
buswarrior
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makemineatwostroke
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« Reply #8 on: April 13, 2008, 06:46:50 AM »

Clink I have been around these engines for a long time what you are doing is not going to damage your engine,like BW stated every 30  days I would run the engine just do  not idle it at 600 rpm for long periods the fast idle is there for a reason buses have it  not only to help with the large ac units but like the trucks equipped with the fast idle it is to keep the oil pressure up and keep any buildup of oil and fuel in the air box out. If you notice more gray ,blue or white smoke than normal then it is time for a drive.DD has a ridged process for storing a engine that is not in use for 30 days and you do not want to go that way   have a good day and are you confused yet
« Last Edit: April 13, 2008, 06:58:28 AM by makemineatwostroke » Logged
steve5B
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« Reply #9 on: April 13, 2008, 07:07:56 AM »



  About idling also, 1hr. of idling is the same as 8hrs of ware through oil analysis.



   Steve 5B.........
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makemineatwostroke
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« Reply #10 on: April 13, 2008, 07:11:58 AM »

 thats true at 500 to 700 rpm

Quote
  About idling also, 1hr. of idling is the same as 8hrs of ware through oil analysis.
   Steve 5B.........
« Last Edit: April 13, 2008, 11:06:11 AM by DrivingMissLazy » Logged
TomC
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« Reply #11 on: April 13, 2008, 09:43:10 AM »

Many states have implemented a no idling rule for trucks and buses (shut down after 10 minutes max).  This is why many truckers are using the small gensets or APU's for heat and A/C when stopped.  Personally, I had a 6.5 gasoline powered commercial grade Onan.  I never understood the logic of idling a 14 liter 500hp engine to power a 5 hp air conditioning compressor.  Over the average 5 years life of the truck (by many company standards) the APU will pay for itself in about 2 years.  You'll notice that ever WalMart over the road truck has one.
If you leave your bus outside, just cover up the exhaust and leave it sit-much better than starting it and just idling it.  If you do start it, you should fast idle it at around 900rpm as soon as you can.  Idling any Diesel engine is the worst thing you can do since it is the hardest on the bearings-with the combination of low oil pressure and the natural vibration at the low rpm of idle.  When I was driving, I would start my truck, wait for oil pressure to come up (maybe a minute) then raise up to 900rpm (I have a ball point pen I use that fits perfectly between the pedal and the bottom of the dash that puts the gas pedal in the correct position for 900 rpm-then again, Caterpillars have full range governors, unlike Detroits that just have rpm limiting governors).  Good Luck, TomC
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« Reply #12 on: April 13, 2008, 05:48:57 PM »

Tom
Quote
Caterpillars have full range governors, unlike Detroits that just have rpm limiting governors).  Good Luck, TomC
What is the difference in the governors and how does it affect the driveability of the vehicle?
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chazwood
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« Reply #13 on: April 13, 2008, 06:12:42 PM »

My bus is only happy, with the wind in her teeth, passing trucks, up against the governor.

 I feel like I'm hurting her feelings when I shut her down. I'm convinced that the reason this bus didn't come with a key is because the designers never meant for her to shut down. Maybe for a little service now and then.... but that's it. Then I began to think .....wait a minute....I've been on my share of greyhound buses......I don't remember ever hearing one start up. They were always running. Fast idle.

Ahhhh. The memories.......  As a kid, there was something magic about being at a bus station at night and hearing a group Greyhounds sitting in their docking bays.... ready, at fast idle. Waiting ....patient.....crouched in the frosty air, their hot breath creating swirls of mist rising up around their running lights.  Poised, tied up, against the dirty curb like some powerful, friendly mystical giant beast, anxious to feel the touch of her masters hand on the reins and hear those magic words .... "Let's go girl"..... Waiting for her master to tell her to do what she was born to do.... what she lives to do.....what she loves to do....to strain against her traces in the biting cold wind and run all out on the dark lonely roads, carrying, protecting and keeping warm, her precious cargo, nestled deep in her belly.

Thanks

Chazwood.

« Last Edit: April 13, 2008, 06:21:03 PM by chazwood » Logged

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« Reply #14 on: April 13, 2008, 06:15:45 PM »

even high idle is not really good....no load is bad......if you can afford the bus you can afford to take it on a short 30-50 mile exersice every so often.....doesn;t need to be monthy.

taxiing around the propert does not really do anything....you need to get theings warm and moving.
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