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Author Topic: question regarding anti theft security of rubber hinges...  (Read 2474 times)
zubzub
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« on: April 14, 2008, 01:50:19 PM »

Seems to me that the rubber hinges on the bay doors, are a razor blade away from opening up even a locked bay. Is this so? and would a few chain links bolted below be a decent solution.
I am including the fact that i know when someone wants in they get in, but still I like to do my bit to disuade them.
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jackhartjr
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« Reply #1 on: April 14, 2008, 02:06:53 PM »

Haven't heard of it being a problem.

I am interested in everyone else's take on it!
Jack
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« Reply #2 on: April 14, 2008, 02:11:34 PM »

Like Jack, I haven't heard of it happening, but it certainly could.  Another good argument for piano hinges I suppose.

Your chain link backup seems feasible and it would provide a safety catch in case the rubber hinge failed, preventing the door from falling completely off.
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luvrbus
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« Reply #3 on: April 14, 2008, 02:20:47 PM »

If all the rubber hinges are made like my Eagle and most are they are going to need a dozen razor knifes and about 1 hour to cut it
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Gary LaBombard
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« Reply #4 on: April 14, 2008, 03:14:31 PM »

zubzub,
I did not think of the security issue as you pointed out and that is good to consider if you have valuable inverters, toys etc. inside your baggage bays and have an Eagle or any bus with rubber hinges.  I did intend to put on each end of my doors I am rebuilding a chain attached to the upper part of the door on the inside on one end and the other end to the frame above the door on the inside of the baggage compt. 

The reason for my chain attached to the door and bus frame??  Well, I told you all some time ago about the rubber just on my baggage bay door on my Eagle broke from age etc, as I was leaning inside of my baggage bay door and the door come down on the back of my legs like a guillotine.  I was caught there for a long time until I wiggled my way inside of the baggage compartment.  I then crawled over the top of the collapsed door, there was about 12 inches in opening I guess and went in the house and never come out for several days.  My legs hurt so bad.  I was going to install the chains for safety only even though my rubber hinges will all be new but I wanted to have a little safety factor there just in case.  The security thought that zubzub pointed out is also good, make the chain just long enough for the door to release  and not interfere with normal opening and closing of your bay door, but prevent the baggage door from dropping down like mine did so someone can get inside.  I weigh 220 lbs, and squeezed out my opening that is available when door drops down.   

Great idea for my conversion zubzub, thanks.
Gary
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Gary
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« Reply #5 on: April 14, 2008, 03:41:58 PM »

If I recall correctly from my 4106 experience you cannot get the door off if securly latched, even without a hinge. So I don't think it creates a higher probability of theft. Injuries are another matter. But, if you are inspecting them you should be able to easily see if one is about to fail. I had a old hinge break (I knew it would eventually because it looked bad) and found the door stayed on fine without it. I fix it right away because it is a pain not to have a hinge on it. I don't know about other makes or models.
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« Reply #6 on: April 14, 2008, 03:46:13 PM »

One more thing, I don't think the average Joe would know much about the rubber hinge anyway. If it was attacked, you would think it would be from someone who had a little knowledge of older buses, but not enough. It would be easier and still necessary to defeat the latch lock if installed.
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L. Christley - W3EYE Amateur Extra
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« Reply #7 on: April 14, 2008, 03:52:38 PM »

Thing number two. I can easily pick just about any standard lock with a modified hack saw blade in a half minute, not much more (no bump key required). I have gotten plenty of pratice here where I work. Any thief with any smarts and skill will get what he wants and do it with amazing speed.
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« Reply #8 on: April 14, 2008, 06:47:35 PM »

Just a short chain would be a better deterrent......just make sure there's a drip-fanged-junk-yard dog with a backbone like a picket fence on the end of it.



Ok......... I'll shut up now.
« Last Edit: April 14, 2008, 06:49:12 PM by chazwood » Logged

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« Reply #9 on: April 14, 2008, 07:11:08 PM »

Or............You could hook up an alarm..........When someone touches you coach the sound of a Colt 45 signals the calvary is here....... Grin

I agree with luvrbus, that rubber is hard to cut. It would take several passes and they just might give up. If it old and rotten, differant story.

Like the chain idea, might have to think that through some more.

When I win the Lotto I'm going to build cafe style doors built like Fort Knox.

Paul
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Ed Hackenbruch
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« Reply #10 on: April 14, 2008, 10:00:06 PM »

Interesting......just last week i added chaining my bay door to my to/do list. Not for theft deterent but in case of rubber hinge failure going down the hiway. Haven't decided whether to use chain or cable tho.
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« Reply #11 on: April 15, 2008, 12:15:55 AM »

I was thinking about this my self
Interesting......just last week i added chaining my bay door to my to/do list. Not for theft deterent but in case of rubber hinge failure going down the hiway. Haven't decided whether to use chain or cable tho.
Only I was thinking I have several sections of 2 inch strap that I have picked up on the side of the road etc.. I think I could put a 1/4 20 bolt thur it and a big washer aon each end and fassen it to the coach with out much problem.  This would heep them from falling if the hindge did break at any time.

I am sure bay doors would be hard to find since I can't figure what kind of bus this was in the first place.
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« Reply #12 on: April 15, 2008, 04:41:02 AM »

If I recall correctly from my 4106 experience you cannot get the door off if securly latched, even without a hinge. So I don't think it creates a higher probability of theft. Injuries are another matter. But, if you are inspecting them you should be able to easily see if one is about to fail. I had a old hinge break (I knew it would eventually because it looked bad) and found the door stayed on fine without it. I fix it right away because it is a pain not to have a hinge on it. I don't know about other makes or models.

I agree with this. I do not believe it is possible to get the door off if it is latched shut and locked.

Richard
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« Reply #13 on: April 15, 2008, 05:19:36 AM »

Depends on the kind of latch.  RTS bays use a cam lock at the bottom.  If the hinge breaks or were cut, they just lift out (or fall out).
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Gary LaBombard
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« Reply #14 on: April 15, 2008, 05:29:39 AM »

After thinking of all the above about the door being locked it would be pretty difficult to open the door even if the rubber was cut.  I believe the chain or very heavy nylon or rubber duty strap or something similar on each end of the door would best be served for safety in case of a rotted rubber hinge.  Just keep remembering, my bay door did collapse on the back of my legs and who could of bet on this happening at that moment I was leaning inside.  I could of lost a leg or both, the edge of my bay door had very sharp edges.  The odds would be 1,000,000 to 1 the door would fall unexpectedly with no bus movement at the time but it did.  I only offer this information to help, to make you aware it can and does happen.  Do not take chances with dry rotted rubber hinges.

I still believe the door can fall out even if locked if the rubber is rotted now on both sides like mine was but believe it would take some force to push it out, I don't even want to gamble on this and certainly not worth testing.

Thanks again zubzub anyhow, it still motivated me to use chains or straps for safety anyhow.
Gary

 

« Last Edit: April 15, 2008, 05:38:35 AM by Gary LaBombard » Logged

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« Reply #15 on: April 15, 2008, 06:01:41 AM »

The more difficult it is for the thief to get in, the more damage is done.

I had a friend who never locked his car. He said he'd rather not deal with the broken glass. . . . A different way of looking at it, I suppose.

I carry theft & vandalism insurance & hope I don't need it.

My own experience is that my biggest losses are from the damage done, not the stuff taken.
I guess I don't have much worth taking . . .  Huh

The best you can do is make your stuff less attractive to the thieves. . . . Cool
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« Reply #16 on: April 15, 2008, 06:26:00 AM »

The more difficult it is for the thief to get in, the more damage is done.

I had a friend who never locked his car. He said he'd rather not deal with the broken glass. . . . A different way of looking at it, I suppose.

I carry theft & vandalism insurance & hope I don't need it.

My own experience is that my biggest losses are from the damage done, not the stuff taken.
I guess I don't have much worth taking . . .  Huh

The best you can do is make your stuff less attractive to the thieves. . . . Cool

It's a sad truth.  Sometimes it seems like some of the islamic countries have that part right.  Punishment that makes them think twice.  Cut a hand off when they get caught stealing.
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« Reply #17 on: April 15, 2008, 07:56:03 AM »

Guys,

So some will go through the trouble of adding some sort of "safety" in case of a rotted hinge? Wouldn't it be easier to replace the hinge and maintain it to start with? It's not like you cannot tell when they are past due replacing. It's not that hard to do. What am I missing here?
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L. Christley - W3EYE Amateur Extra
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« Reply #18 on: April 15, 2008, 03:35:45 PM »

What concerns me more than my bay security is fuel theft. If someone steals your fuel, there is no way to identify it as yours. Moreover, it is super easy to make it disappear. I have yet to see an inexpensive simple deterrent for that problem with my GM.
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L. Christley - W3EYE Amateur Extra
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« Reply #19 on: April 15, 2008, 04:26:00 PM »

As been said: The doors won't open if the rubber is cut.

My experience has been that that door rubber ALWAYS fails during the opening process!

I have replaced all my top hinges with the stainless and the middle with the rubber.

It is an item that I always carry a spare to replace, its not that hard , but better to practice at home.....

I added cam lock keyed latches to my doors, but nothing will keep out the determined, just the opportunist.

Cliff
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« Reply #20 on: April 15, 2008, 04:38:25 PM »

Even my Dina has rubber hinges on the battery door and the driver's heater compartment door.  I suppose I better look into replacing those hinges.  I believe those doors latch on the top and bottom on both sides, but I think because of the way they hook that they could come loose if the hinge breaks.

Those doors are almost priceless as there are relatively few scrap Dinas out there and only a slim chance of a new door.
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Gary LaBombard
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« Reply #21 on: April 15, 2008, 05:27:33 PM »

Replacing the rubber hinge with replacement rubber hinge is more difficult than you think.  To do alone is possible, I have done it on all 6 doors but with much difficulty.  To have a friend assist and to have 3 of you to replace the hinges is best and easiest. 

Many replace the rubber with stainless hinges, what ever each owner chooses to do is their personal choice.  BUT, replacing the weather checked hinges should be done if you suspect they are showing bad splits from weather check etc.

I still long for the safety factor even if the hinge is not weather checked.  That is my personal desire to have a plan "B".  What ever I do does not mean anyone else has to.
Gary
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« Reply #22 on: April 15, 2008, 09:50:31 PM »

There are a few access doors on a GM that would be lost if the hinge failed. I have seen a few missing their A/C compartment doors. My bus almost lost that door when my father drove it home for me. Thankfully he ripped it off and put it in a bay because those parts are expensive to replace. Because of the ideas on this post I am going to rig up some type of strap to keep from possibly loosing one. Different reason but using the same concept.
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L. Christley - W3EYE Amateur Extra
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« Reply #23 on: April 16, 2008, 12:11:07 AM »

Gary,

Very scary story.  Thanks!

John
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