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Author Topic: paint products for paintng a bus  (Read 3386 times)
jackhartjr
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« Reply #15 on: April 16, 2008, 07:26:22 PM »

I like what Larry said, a truck painted almost 30 years ago...and still looking good!

Jack
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luvrbus
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« Reply #16 on: April 16, 2008, 07:35:51 PM »

you can buy Imron here in the US today it comes in two different types the polyurethane single stage and the base coat, clear coat the single stage does not have the polyester now and is not the same paint it was 20 years ago
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DrivingMissLazy
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« Reply #17 on: April 16, 2008, 07:51:49 PM »

Imron was outlawed about 15 years ago in California. I had DML painted prior to that time and she still looks great.

Richard
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« Reply #18 on: April 16, 2008, 07:56:34 PM »

I'm surprised they haven't outlawed paint all together in California by now.  You know, that latex wall paint might emit some water vapor into the air!
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« Reply #19 on: April 16, 2008, 07:56:51 PM »

I used PPG acylic urethane. Used two gallons of color (base), once all the trim and removeables were painted, at a cost of $299 per gallon.
This was a two part BC/CC paint.  
6 coats of clear may cause a problem.  That's about 3 extra coats of clear.   Clear isn't as expensive as the color coat, but laying on a really thick clear may lead to cracking.  That would be a major bummer.  
As has been stated, application instructions for these highly toxic paints are closely held..  Not available to the public without a lot of digging.  
Be sure that whoever shoots isocyanate paint is familiar with the toxicity of this product.
And, hope that they are mixing it correctly.  Removing botched urethane would be an absolute nightmare.    
Usually one color coat is layed down, followed by another coat in about 20 minutes--or after flash.  Then in about another 20 minutes the first clear is applied.  Followed by a second medium coat in about 20 minutes.  Then a wet 3rd coat can be applied for a really slick look.
There is no sanding between coats....as long as the window of application opportunity is followed.  After about 12 hours, the color will have to be scuffed with a 3M pad.  You don't want to let this happen.  
Always use the "system" that the manufacturer recommends. Don't mix-n-match catalyzers or flex agents.  Unless you are painting shock bumpers or rooftop AC housings, you don't need flex agents.
If you have riveted panels, forget "rubbing" out the clear.  You'll damage the finish over rivets.  
Also item of importance is the primer and prep.  Use only recommended system primers.
The clear will blend a world of faults....it is also easy to repair if lightly scratched.   Good quality paint will be attractive for a good many years of applied correctly.  
Expect a few sags in the clear.  If you get enough on, there will be sags.   Let it dry good over several months and block them out.   Don't get in a rush to make repairs until the paint and clear is completely dried.  It'll be soft for a month.  It'll feel hard, but it ain't.  However, the bus will be useable almost immediately.  The paint will dry to touch in less than an hour.
Watch the gun pressure when using HVLP guns and catalyzed finishes.  Critical that the correct pressure AT THE GUN, not the wall, is maintained.
Don't let anyone modify the mixing instructions.  Just don't play with the ratios.  Get plenty of disposable mixing cups, and throw them away as you use them.  Gun liners are nice...but optional.  
Painting a coach with catalyzed paint is a job for a crew.  Get some help, or keep your panels small so that it requires no more than one cup to complete.  Help can mix while the application is made...greatly facilitates completion timing.  Be careful in hot weather and use a reducer that tends to the slow side of your calculations.  If the finish dries too fast, it won't flow out.  It'll have that 'spray can' look.  Look like crap.  Another major bummer!  
No waxing for a couple of months.  
Good luck with your project!


JR  
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JR Lynch , Charlotte, NC
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« Reply #20 on: April 16, 2008, 08:00:12 PM »

All good advice going on here.  My 2 cents:  Any of the name brand urethane enamel with hardener is a good call.  6 coats of clear seems a  lot unless you have to cover a lot of graphics or you are planning to color sand and buff (show car stuff! and a big job on a bus!).  Sometimes, many coats of clear ( thick paint ) invites problems.  2 coats of clear over color will give the depth and shine you are after.  And allow flexing without  the cracking.  As already noted, prep is the key to painting.  Spend the $ for hand sanding each rivet.  If you don't and the paint chips off or peels then you have a costly nightmare to strip the paint.  Sand now -- enjoy forever!
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« Reply #21 on: April 16, 2008, 08:02:30 PM »

I'm surprised they haven't outlawed paint all together in California by now.  You know, that latex wall paint might emit some water vapor into the air!

I read that California was going to outlaw people.  People exhaust carbon dioxide...and methane. 
JR
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JR Lynch , Charlotte, NC
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"Every government interference in the economy consists of giving an unearned benefit, extorted by force, to some men at the expense of others.

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eaglelover15
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« Reply #22 on: April 17, 2008, 07:42:56 PM »

Ok guys thanks for the help I have decided to go with the PPG Vibrance system because of the pearl and candy red for the base haven't decided on the graphics or the color for the graphics yet.I am going to have it stripped to the bare metal and have a good primer put on, it has a few places the paint and primer is lifting and I don't want any problems.Another question for you guys what is a good digital camera to buy I am still in the 35m age and it is not good for posting pictures and about the clear coat 2 to 6 coats is the normal by most shops with no problem (they told me) but 8 will cause a problem in time
« Last Edit: April 17, 2008, 07:51:07 PM by eaglelover15 » Logged
Dreamscape
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« Reply #23 on: April 17, 2008, 07:48:17 PM »

I have a good Sony Cyber-Shot, about 125 bucks at most stores. Great photos and easy to learn and use. It has a 2 GB disk, holds lots and lots of photos. Model DSC - S650, 7.2 Mega Pixels. Get rechargeable AA batteries and charger, a must.

My other is a Cannon A 70, it is also pretty good. The support you get at Cannon is second to none. I lost my LCD screen and they replaced it for free!

Good Luck,

Paul
« Last Edit: April 17, 2008, 07:53:06 PM by Dreamscape » Logged
eaglelover15
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« Reply #24 on: April 17, 2008, 07:57:16 PM »

Paul do you know if the Olympus is good I have had my OM4 for years but it is a 35m  and I will never completely it give up
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Dreamscape
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« Reply #25 on: April 17, 2008, 08:37:54 PM »

I have no experience with Olympus. I have heard they are good cameras though. Do a search and compare on any of the camera sites.
Sorry I can't help you more.

The one thing I like about the digital cameras is they have so many options and features. My Sony can also take short movie clips, which is handy, sound also.

I had an old Mimya Sikor for years, still have it but don't use it anymore. I haven't seen for years so I probably forgot how to spell it correctly. Oh Well.

Paul
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bobofthenorth
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« Reply #26 on: April 17, 2008, 08:51:42 PM »

I don't know how we morphed from painting to cameras but I use the same rules for digital as I did for film namely that there are 2 things that influence the final picture quality:
- the lens
- the film/CCD

I shot all my 35 mm on Pentax equipment with primarily Kodachrome 25.  I switched to Canon for my digital - they have good optics and the legacy Canon lenses will work if you were a Canon guy.  As far as I am concerned you only have 2 choices in lenses - Canon or Nikon.  Once you make the lens decision then your camera is what it is and you want as high a megapixel CCD as you can afford.  The CCD corresponds to the film - higher megapixel corresponds to better quality film emulsion. 

A little photo-trivia: I just digitized my entire slide collection and my father's as well.  The Kodachrome has hardly changed - in some cases in over 50 years.  The Fuji has colour shifted to the blues and the Ektachrome has washed out but the Kodachrome is almost as sharp as the day it was shot. 
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H3Jim
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« Reply #27 on: April 17, 2008, 11:28:24 PM »

I have had quite few Olympus cameras, both 35 mm and digital.  their digitals are very good.  their ccd always seems to produce better pictures than the pixel count would lead to to believe.  But electronics have come so far, they are all excellent.

My laptop has a port in the front where I can put my camera chip, so downloading pics is easy and fast.  no extra cables, nice on a trip.  Takes all three different types.
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Hobie
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« Reply #28 on: April 18, 2008, 04:29:56 AM »

Couple of thoughts. 

AA batteries is good call as you can get them anywhere.  If the camera has a special battery ...there will be a time when it dies and you don't have time to recharge. 

Get one that fits your hand.   Some are so small it is hard to hold and can be easily dropped-- resulting in dead camera! 

Shutter delay is the time it takes the camera to take the picture after you press the button.  The better cameras have less delay. 

6 mega pix - minimum.
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Highway Yacht
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« Reply #29 on: April 18, 2008, 05:24:42 AM »

I have had 2 Olympus cameras in the past and they were both good cameras. I now use a Sony Cyber-Shot with 7.2 mega-pixels and it is by far superior to the older outdated Olympus cameras I used before. It has many picture taking options like taking still images in 1080 full HD, and it also takes great video movies too and it is very easy to use. I use a 2.0 Gig Ultra II San Disk memory stick that will hold several thousand photos as well as the video movie clips. The Sony Cyber-Shot uses a Lithium Ion battery pack which I love because you can use it for tons of photos and veiwing before recharging and the recharging is fast. The older olympus cameras I have use the rechargable AA batteries and didn't last 1/4 of the time.
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