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Author Topic: shore power contection  (Read 6606 times)
Sean
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'85 Neoplan Spaceliner "Odyssey"


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« Reply #60 on: April 30, 2008, 03:54:51 PM »

Actually, I don't think BX exists any longer.  You are looking for type MC (metal clad) which comes in both steel and aluminum jacket.  The aluminum is much easier to work with, the steel is more protective from crushing forces.  There is also a limited bend radius when using this.  You can finf type MC and the proper fitting at HD


Sorry -- it's a trap that even I, code-weenie that I am, fall into.  I was using the older term BX to refer generically to both MC and AC types of cable (metal-clad and armored).  The principle difference between those is the use of the cladding for safety ground on AC (and the old-style BX) vs. an included ground conductor in MC.  For this reason, MC is preferable, IMO.

And, yes, fittings for both are available wherever the cable is sold.  The package will say right on it what cable it is approved to work with.

If I may suggest, use the 24' one for now.  Get the longer one later.  Not that hard to switch them later.


I agree with this 100%.  Especially if you go ahead and use a "separable" cord arrangement such as with the Marinco inlet we discussed.  We're only talking about a foot difference, and the older code only called for 23' anyway.

-Sean
http://OurOdyssey.BlogSpot.com
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Full-timing in a 1985 Neoplan Spaceliner since 2004.
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belfert
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« Reply #61 on: April 30, 2008, 05:30:25 PM »

I don't think anyone is going around RV campgrounds with a tape measure checking the length of power cords.  Who exactly would enforce the NEC for RVs anyhow?

Most states and/or municipalities incorporate the NEC into their building code, but for residential inspections are generally only done during new construction or an addition.  Changes in the NEC generally don't have to be retrofitted into single family existing homes except when the city requires code inspections at the time of sale.
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Brian Elfert - 1995 Dina Viaggio 1000 Series 60/B500 - 75% done but usable - Minneapolis, MN
Sean
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« Reply #62 on: April 30, 2008, 07:37:29 PM »

I don't think anyone is going around RV campgrounds with a tape measure checking the length of power cords.  Who exactly would enforce the NEC for RVs anyhow?


As I have written before, generally no one.  However, if you ever sell your coach, the buyer can sue you for failing to follow codes, especially if they experience some kind of loss such as a fire.

For that matter, your insurance company can deny claims if they result from your willful failure to comply with applicable codes.

For that reason, I always recommend people follow all codes in force at the time of their conversion, even if they never expect it to impact the way they plan to use the coach.

FWIW.

-Sean
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Full-timing in a 1985 Neoplan Spaceliner since 2004.
Our blog: http://OurOdyssey.BlogSpot.com
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