Bus Conversions dot Com Bulletin Board
November 26, 2014, 05:55:28 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: If you had an Online Subscription: It can be read on any computer, iPad, smart phone, or compatible device.
   Home   Help Forum Rules Search Calendar Login Register BCM Home Page Contact BCM  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: # 4 industrial fuel ok as diesel??  (Read 1335 times)
Lonnie time to go
Lonnie
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 301

Saginaw, Michgan




Ignore
« on: June 05, 2008, 01:20:41 PM »

I know I will get spanked on this but i have to ask.
A local company sells #4 industrial fuel for 1.25 gal.
I looked up the meaning of #4 fuel oil  thay compared #2 fuel oil as equal to #2 diesel
so would # 4 fuel compare to #4 diesel.
Yes it will red dye in it maybe but if I find a way to pay road tax it will be about  1.50 gal. in
total price.
can this used to run a DD 8V71 engine.

I do not claim to have any brains when it comes to diesels so forgive me.
Logged

1976 4905
luvrbus
Guest

« Reply #1 on: June 05, 2008, 01:32:26 PM »

timetogo, # 4 fuel is a very heavy fuel and the only places I have seen it used is a low RPM engine with constant HP needs (BIG ENGINES)  like the Cooper-Bessemer 5500 hp 500 to 750 rpm  fwiw
« Last Edit: June 05, 2008, 02:04:37 PM by luvrbus » Logged
Len Silva
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 4086


Angle Parked in a Parallel Universe


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #2 on: June 05, 2008, 05:08:51 PM »

I really don't have a clue but perhaps with more research......if you heat it like WVO it might work???

Len
Logged


Hand Made Gifts

Ignorance is only bliss to the ignorant.
Nusa
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 540




Ignore
« Reply #3 on: June 05, 2008, 11:24:35 PM »

My understanding is that #4 is mainly used for industrial/commercial heating purposes, mainly in older buildings/schools, often on boilers that were converted from coal-burning. It's a heavy oil, but not so heavy that it has to be pre-heated  to burn.

#5 and especially #6 are thick enough that you need special equipment to pre-heat it for burning, so only large commercial installations and ship engines typically use it.

There's typically a lot of sulfer and ash in the heavier oils as well. They get what's left over after the lighter oils are distilled out of the crude.
Logged
TomC
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 6901





Ignore
« Reply #4 on: June 06, 2008, 08:59:25 AM »

A little story on industrial Diesel fuel.  Here in Los Angeles is the Hyperion sewage pumping plant that for years used Worthington dual fuel engines (16" bore x 20" stroke) running at 360rpm to both generate power and to provide the compressed air for pumping air through the sewage to hasten the break down of molecules (the engines are not used anymore because of emissions).  The engines used 10% Diesel and 90% methane created by the sewage being warmed to 140 degrees and pressurized to 5 pounds in huge register tanks.  During the 70's, one of the employees had a Mercedes 240 Diesel that got the bright idea to just "borrow" some of the #3 Diesel.  After a couple of tanks, he burned holes in the top of all of his pistons since it is a hotter burning fuel.  #4 as you described is even hotter.  You can run the fuel in your bus, but you should reduce the injector size down at least one, if not two sizes.  Personally think it is not worth the risk for a blown engine to run it.  Good Luck, TomC
Logged

Tom & Donna Christman. '77 AMGeneral 10240B; 8V-71TATAIC V730.
Lonnie time to go
Lonnie
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 301

Saginaw, Michgan




Ignore
« Reply #5 on: June 06, 2008, 01:10:46 PM »

new info on industrial fuel #4 I can pay road tax at the place of purchase
I have read it does burn hotter than #2 diesel
wondering if auto trans fluid will thin down or kerosene
If I can get it to burn at a lower temp plus filter to 5 microns should be ok.
need opinions on this please
Logged

1976 4905
luvrbus
Guest

« Reply #6 on: June 06, 2008, 05:02:55 PM »

Timetogo, you need to do a lot of research on this topic auto tranny fluid will eventually destroy your engine and is thicker than #2 fuel so no way would that thin it and kerosene is a little lighter than # 2 fuel but the industrial fuel is heavier than the # 4 diesel. my way of thinking would be you would have more kerosene than # 4 fuel  by the time you are finished with the process and kerosene was $8.00 per gal today at a station where I buy it.


Good luck on this adventure
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.18 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!